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Woman Denied Treatment By Catholic Hospital, Forced To Drive 80 Miles For Help With Miscarriage


Posted by monica bielanko on June 8th, 2011 at 7:25 am
catholic 300x208 Woman Denied Treatment By Catholic Hospital, Forced To Drive 80 Miles For Help With Miscarriage

Do you want these guys making important health care decisions for you?

Kathleen Prieskorn was three months pregnant and working as a waitress when she realized she was having her second miscarriage. She rushed to her doctor’s office where, as she tells writer Molly M. Ginty at Ms. Magazine, she learned her amniotic sac had torn.

Prieskorn lives in Manchester, New Hampshire with her husband. The nearest hospital had recently merged with a Catholic hospital so her doctor could not help her complete her miscarriage.

“… because my doctor could still detect a fetal heartbeat, he wasn’t allowed to give me a uterine evacuation that would help me complete my miscarriage.”

To get someone to perform the procedure, the poor woman had to drive eighty miles to a hospital that would perform the procedure. Prieskorn has no car and no health insurance, so an expensive ambulance trip was out of the question. Instead, as Ginty reports, Prieskorn’s doctor gave her $400 of his own cash and put her in a cab.

I am dumbfounded. How could a hospital turn away someone who might die? What about the Hippocratic Oath? Making a bleeding woman drive eighty miles for help is certainly unethical. But religion trumps ethics, I guess? How is this happening in America?  Is this the new perversion of freedom of religion?

“During that trip, which seemed endless, I was not only devastated, but terrified,” Prieskorn tells Ginty. “I knew that if there were complications I could lose my uterus—and maybe even my life.”

It could happen to you. It could happen to me, it could happen to anyone. You don’t have to be Catholic to end up at a Catholic hospital. In fact, one of the nearest hospitals to me is a Catholic hospital. God forbid I have to go there in an emergency situation that goes against their religion.

It’s happening all the time to women everywhere. According to Ginty, “Catholic institutions have became the largest not-for-profit source of healthcare in America, treating 1 in 6 hospital patients.” The Catholic hospitals have to follow Ethical and Religious Directives that are issued by the 258 member U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Oh goody. So the religious beliefs of a bunch of men (probably all old, white men who are, of course, celibate) are dictating the reproductive health care millions of women receive? And, as in Prieskorn’s case, forcing life-threatening situations that are at odds with what hospitals were created to do in the first place?  You know, like, SAVE LIVES regardless of stuff like race and religion? Apparently so. The Catholic hospitals are required to adhere to the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services and those ultra conservative rules are issued by the 258-member U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Because of the directives, doctors and nurses at Catholic-affiliated facilities are not allowed to perform procedures that the Catholic Church deems “intrinsically immoral, such as abortion and direct sterilization.” Those medical personnel also cannot give rape survivors drugs to prevent pregnancy unless there is “no evidence that conception has already occurred.” The only birth control they can dispense is advice about “natural family planning”— laborious daily charting of a woman’s basal temperature and cervical mucus in order to abstain from sex when she is ovulating—which only 0.1 percent of women use. The Catholic directives involve not just abortion and birth control but ectopic pregnancies, embryonic stem cell research, in-vitro fertilization, sterilizations and more.

Ginty details several situations during which women were denied crucial treatment.  In 2009 a 27-year-old, 11-weeks pregnant patient in Arizona “staggered into the emergency room of St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix with such severe pulmonary hypertension that her doctors determined she would die without an immediate abortion.”  Because of the severity of the situation the ethics committee voted to break hospital policy and advise the woman of her option of a lifesaving abortion. She decided to do it, but the bishop overseeing the Phoenix diocese heard about the situation and said St. Joseph’s could no longer be a Catholic institution unless it agreed to follow Catholic “moral teachings.” He excommunicated a nun and said they could no longer hold Catholic Mass in the hospital’s chapel.

Another Arizona woman went to the ER of a Catholic hospital while miscarrying one of her twin babies.  But she was sent to another hospital after doctors refused to help her, saying the fetus was alive, although not viable The incidents are piling up.  Doctors at a Catholic institution in New York allegedy refused to terminate an ectopic pregnancy even though the embryo could not possibly survive where it attached outside the woman’s uterus.

How is this happening? How are women being denied essential medical care? Ginty answers some of those questions in her most excellent article and it should come as no surprise to any woman that George W. Bush had a hand in things, mucking up the works.

The debacle starts with anti-choice legislation. The U.S. Congress started to pass “conscience clauses” pushed by the Roman Catholic Church and anti-abortion forces in the immediate wake of the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion in 1973. Today, these laws apply not only to physicians and nurses who oppose abortion, but to entire institutions whose “consciences” allow them to withhold medically indicated care.

In 2008 the George W. Bush administration issued regulations giving healthcare workers the right to refuse
to take part in any procedure that “violates” their religious beliefs. The Obama administration moved to reverse this policy in February but 47 states and the District of Columbia now allow individuals or entities to refuse women reproductive health services, information or referrals.

What do you think? Should Catholic hospitals retain the right to refuse healthcare? Or should they be required to help anyone needing care? Should religions even be able to open hospitals?  What would Jesus do?  I think that answer is obvious, what about you?

by on Jun. 8, 2011 at 6:51 PM
Replies (81-90):
Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Nov. 15, 2012 at 5:01 PM


Quoting carriecal:

I know in the movies you see blood and before you know it it is all over. In reality, both the mother and fetus can die if the miscarriage is not handled cautiously. If the fetus cannot come out on it's own it has to be aborted by the doctor.

WHOA!

Blast rom the past!!

Ashley_Carlson
by on Nov. 15, 2012 at 5:02 PM
1 mom liked this

My first miscarriage nearly killed me. I had to have a blood transfusion and an emergency D&C or I would have bled to death. Miscarriages become life threatening far more often then peple think.

Quoting TruthSeeker.:

 I'm confused. She was having a miscarriage, but there was still a heartbeat and she wanted an abortion or D&C and the hospital wouldn't do it?

 I also wonder how "life threatening" a miscarriage is? Honest question. I've never had one, but always assumed most people have them at home with no complications?


Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Nov. 15, 2012 at 5:05 PM


Quoting 12hellokitty:

Is there a link to the story?  I'm asking because not long ago there was a story of a woman who was raped and refused treatment at a Catholic hospital that couldn't be conferment other then in blog posts. 

if this wasn't a year and a half old I might be able to add a link. I don't know I why I didn't add it originally

FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Nov. 15, 2012 at 5:41 PM


Quoting Susan0805:

I had bleeding with my first pregnancy, it was to early to see a heartbeat, it was not a religious hospital. Most hospitals will let nature runs its course and not intervene unless its life threatening. If they were replacing blood volume loss they may have not seen it as life threatening. Before my hysterectomy i bled for 4 weeks and they didnt intervene immediately.

Quoting FromAtoZ:


Quoting Susan0805:

She couldnt be, by federal law. I work for a religious healthcare network.

Quoting TruthSeeker.:

    If she was having excessive or life threatening bleeding I don't think she would have been turned away.


Quoting Della529:


 It depends on the MC type.  Infection or excessive bleeding are both life threatening.


Quoting TruthSeeker.:


 I'm confused. She was having a miscarriage, but there was still a heartbeat and she wanted an abortion or D&C and the hospital wouldn't do it?


 I also wonder how "life threatening" a miscarriage is? Honest question. I've never had one, but always assumed most people have them at home with no complications?


 


 


I was turned away.  I was bleeding so badly that, while sitting in the chair, the blood ran down the sides of the chair.

This was years ago, I was 23.  I am now 48.  

They performed the ultrasound and because there was a faint heartbeat, they refused to do any thing and sent me home to wait.  

I was in the hospital for 3 days and needed a blood transfusion.  


When I was told by the surgeon that had I waited any longer, I could very well have died, to me, that is indeed life threatening.

I have had 4 miscarriages.  I am well aware that, most times, nature does indeed take its course.  But, as I also found out the hard way, some times medical attention is indeed necessary, heart beat or not, in order to save the life of the woman.

"A bird doesn't sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a song." ~ Maya Angelou

PestPatti
by on Nov. 15, 2012 at 7:04 PM


  Our local Catholic hospital just started allowing certain procedures to be done.   

12hellokitty
by Platinum Member on Nov. 16, 2012 at 1:53 PM


Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:


Quoting 12hellokitty:

Is there a link to the story?  I'm asking because not long ago there was a story of a woman who was raped and refused treatment at a Catholic hospital that couldn't be conferment other then in blog posts. 

if this wasn't a year and a half old I might be able to add a link. I don't know I why I didn't add it originally


No problem.  Personally I don't buy the story.  I also looked for any creditable information and could find nothing other then this same piece on blogs. 

GoddessNDaRuff
by Silver Member on Nov. 16, 2012 at 2:19 PM


It could happen to you. It could happen to me, it could happen to anyone. You don’t have to be Catholic to end up at a Catholic hospital. In fact, one of the nearest hospitals to me is a Catholic hospital. God forbid I have to go there in an emergency situation that goes against their religion.


You know I was thinking about this this morning. At what point do the religious objections of the partient trump the institution? It's terrorfying to think that a pregnant woman in an emergency situation could end up at a Catholic hospital because it's closer and they would disrespect her wishes as a non Catholic. It's terrorifying that anyone could end up in that situation.

GoddessNDaRuff
by Silver Member on Nov. 16, 2012 at 2:23 PM


but 47 states and the District of Columbia now allow individuals or entities to refuse women reproductive health services, information or referrals.

That's bullshit!

GoddessNDaRuff
by Silver Member on Nov. 16, 2012 at 2:35 PM

Ha! I didn't either until I got your comment! I'm guessing it resurfaced in light of the woman in Ireland.

Quoting Arroree:


Quoting TruthSeeker.:

 I'm confused. She was having a miscarriage, but there was still a heartbeat and she wanted an abortion or D&C and the hospital wouldn't do it?

 I also wonder how "life threatening" a miscarriage is? Honest question. I've never had one, but always assumed most people have them at home with no complications?

I almost died during my first miscarriage, i was down to 24% blood count and would have died had I not been rushed into surgery to have it medically finished. This is actually quite common, which is why most hospitals will immediately take women miscarrying in for a U/S to see how it's progressing and most are sent straight to surgery to have them finished. Very few women actually do an entire miscarriage at home safely and even those women have to seek medical attention afterwards to keep from dying of complications like infection etc.


ETA: Woops, didn't realize how old this post was, LOL.


FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Nov. 16, 2012 at 2:39 PM

For the love of all that is green.

I just now caught on to how old this post is.

Oh my.

Being sick is my excuse and I'm sticking to it! lmao

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