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Numerous Planned Parenthoods close in wake of new Texas law

Posted by on Aug. 19, 2011 at 4:55 AM
  • 55 Replies

TEXAS, August 18, 2011 (LifeSiteNews.com) - Still reeling from funding cuts in Texas, Planned Parenthood is closing clinics and merging affiliates throughout the state, Texas Right to Life reports.
The national abortion giant received a major blow this summer when Texas Governor and presidential contender Rick Perry signed into law a bill that stripped the organization of its funding, and prohibited the state government from contracting with any organization that provides abortions. 

A July report in the Gainesville Daily Register confirmed the closure of a Planned Parenthood clinic in Gainesville as a direct result of these legislative developments.

“Like many healthcare providers facing funding cuts after this Texas Legislative session, Planned Parenthood is adjusting its business model to ensure that our mission of providing healthcare education and advocacy across Texas remains strong,” Ken Lambrecht, CEO of Planned Parenthood of North Texas, told the news service.  “We are in the process of reconstructing to ensure that we can continue to best serve communities throughout North Texas.”

Texas Right to Life Legislative Director John Seago told LifeSiteNews.com that his organization called over 70 Planned Parenthood clinics in Texas and confirmed six additional closures in Arlington, Mesquite, Plano, Sherman, Terrell, and Waxahachie. All seven locations are scheduled to be closed by the end of September.

Additionally, Planned Parenthood’s website indicates that a center in Groesbeck is “temporarily closed.”

“Even though these clinics are family planning clinics, so there’s not actually any abortions being provided at the clinics that are closing their doors, there’s no mistake that these are abortion-minded clinics that are sending women to abortion clinics,” Seago commented.

He also said that a planned merger between Planned Parenthood’s Waco affiliates in Central Texas and their Austin affiliates is believed to be related to budget cuts, based on press reports of layoffs related to the merger.

The organization has also announced a merger of Louisiana affiliates with affiliates in Houston and Southeast Texas.

Elizabeth Graham, Director of Texas Right to Life, called the developments “historic for the pro-life movement and the protection of women’s health.”

Pro-life advocates in the state are also celebrating an end to tax-funded abortions as a result of the new law, which denies state funds to county hospital districts that use local tax money to fund abortion services.

The Austin American-Statesman reports that the Central Health Board in Travis County, formerly the only county in the state financing abortions with tax revenue, voted unanimously last week to end publicly funded abortion services. 

As LifeSiteNews reported in April, funds stripped from family planning organizations have been re-allocated to pregnancy centers, among other programs. 

According to a recent Texas Tribune report, the Texas legislature allocated an additional $300,000 to the state’s Alternative to Abortion Services program, for a total of $8.3 million in state funding.

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by on Aug. 19, 2011 at 4:55 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Thomigirl
by Platinum Member on Aug. 19, 2011 at 7:15 AM

Yeah, you lost me with this bullshit. Not wasting my time.

Quoting candlegal:

TEXAS, August 18, 2011 (LifeSiteNews.com) - Still reeling from funding cuts in Texas, Planned Parenthood is closing clinics and merging affiliates throughout the state, Texas Right to Life reports.
The national abortion giant received

TwinmomAlicia
by Member on Aug. 19, 2011 at 7:26 AM
That's tough. I personally do not believe in abortion, but Planned Parenthood also provides cervical cancer screening, HIV and other STD testing, and low-cost birth control for those without health insurance. Where are people going to go for those services now?
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resamerie
by Platinum Member on Aug. 19, 2011 at 8:30 AM

 Same here. I hope all these people behind this will be just as happy paying more for PA when all these unwanted children start popping out due to those that can't afford full price for birth control.

Quoting TwinmomAlicia:

That's tough. I personally do not believe in abortion, but Planned Parenthood also provides cervical cancer screening, HIV and other STD testing, and low-cost birth control for those without health insurance. Where are people going to go for those services now?

 

PamR
by Ruby Member on Aug. 19, 2011 at 8:49 AM

Awesome.  Now Right to Life can take pride in knowing that many pregnant women will not get prenatal care, will not be able to get well baby care after they give birth, some women will get pregnant because they can't afford to get birth control, some women will not get potentially life-saving gynecological exams and mammograms - because they are so pro-life, don't you know.

LoriKeet
by on Aug. 19, 2011 at 9:04 AM

And I am SOOO tired of heaaring how people can't afford a few dollars a month for birth control, but can bring a child into the world that requires food, clothing and shelter for at least 18 years!!  Where is the logic in that?!  Oh, I can't afford birth control, so I'll just get preganant, because I have needs, and can't make my boyfriend wear a FREE condom, and then I'll have an abortion, because that's so much better for my body.  Ugh!

http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/alpha-consumer/2010/08/27/the-real-cost-of-birth-control-

"A couple using no birth control has an 85 percent chance of becoming pregnant in one year. The Agriculture Department estimates that on average, middle-income couples spend around $12,500 per year per child.

On an annual basis, that means the Pill costs between $160 to $600.

The American Pregnancy Association reports that one cervical cap, which lasts up to two years, costs between $15 and $50.

Some health clinics distribute condoms for free. Otherwise, on average, they cost between 20 cents and $2.50 each.

Diaphragms require a doctor’s exam, which can cost anywhere from $20 to $200. Planned Parenthood estimates that the cost for the diaphragm itself, which lasts up to two years, falls between $15 to $75.

Planned Parenthood estimates that out of every 100 couples who rely on fertility awareness, between 12 and 25 will become pregnant. The Cost: Free.

IUDs: This T-shaped device, which in some cases also contains hormones, is placed in the uterus by a health care provider. It lasts up to 12 years and is 99 percent effective. The Cost: While the upfront cost is a whopping $500 to $1,000, the fact that it lasts so long means that the average annual cost can be under $100cheaper than condoms.

Depo Shot: Each shot costs between $35 and $75, and sometimes comes with an additional doctor’s visit fee of $20 to $40. That means each year, users can expect to pay between $220 and $460.

Vasectomies costs between $350 to $1,000. Sterilization for women costs between $1,500 and $6,000. But since it’s permanent, the cost per year over the long-term is lower. For example, if a 35-year-old women gets sterilized, it prevents her from getting pregnant for the rest of her fertile years. Spreading the cost of a $4,000 procedure over 20 years brings the annual expense down to $200. Similarly, if her partner gets a $600 vasectomy, the annual cost averages out to just $30 over 20 years.

NuvaRing: costs between $15 and $50 per month, the same as other hormonal methods. Since it requires a prescription, users might also have to pay for an office visit, which can cost between $35 to $200. Excluding that visit, the ring costs between $160 to $600 per year.

A pack of three sponges cost about $15. For a couple that uses two sponges per week, the annual cost averages out to about $500 a year."


Quoting resamerie:

 Same here. I hope all these people behind this will be just as happy paying more for PA when all these unwanted children start popping out due to those that can't afford full price for birth control.

Quoting TwinmomAlicia:

That's tough. I personally do not believe in abortion, but Planned Parenthood also provides cervical cancer screening, HIV and other STD testing, and low-cost birth control for those without health insurance. Where are people going to go for those services now?

 


denise3680
by Platinum Member on Aug. 19, 2011 at 9:10 AM

I always thought that PP was way more than just abortions, am I wrong about that??  Is this really going to stop people from getting abortions?  I mean how is this helping those who rely on these types of facilities for medical necessities other than abortions?  I think people should pay for their own abortions but I do not think it wise to take things away from people who are in need.

TwinmomAlicia
by Member on Aug. 19, 2011 at 9:15 AM
Notwithstanding that you ignored my point about cancer and STD screenings, most of those birth control options require health insurance so that doctors can prescribe them. Planned Parenthood provides a way for uninsured people to get birth control, so they don't end up pregnant and needing Medicaid. True, condoms are cheap and sometimes free, but what about people who are allergic to latex?


Quoting LoriKeet:

And I am SOOO tired of heaaring how people can't afford a few dollars a month for birth control, but can bring a child into the world that requires food, clothing and shelter for at least 18 years!!  Where is the logic in that?!  Oh, I can't afford birth control, so I'll just get preganant, because I have needs, and can't make my boyfriend wear a FREE condom, and then I'll have an abortion, because that's so much better for my body.  Ugh!

http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/alpha-consumer/2010/08/27/the-real-cost-of-birth-control-

"A couple using no birth control has an 85 percent chance of becoming
pregnant in one year. The Agriculture Department estimates that on
average, middle-income couples spend around $12,500 per year per child.

On an annual basis, that means the Pill costs between $160 to $600.

The American Pregnancy Association reports that one cervical cap, which lasts up to two years, costs between $15 and $50.

Some health clinics distribute condoms for free. Otherwise, on average, they cost between 20 cents and $2.50 each.

Diaphragms require a doctor’s exam, which can cost anywhere from $20 to
$200. Planned Parenthood estimates that the cost for the diaphragm
itself, which lasts up to two years, falls between $15 to $75.

Planned Parenthood estimates that out of every 100 couples who rely on
fertility awareness, between 12 and 25 will become pregnant. The Cost: Free.

IUDs: This T-shaped device, which in some cases also contains hormones, is placed in the uterus by a health care provider. It lasts up to 12 years and is 99 percent effective. The Cost:
While the upfront cost is a whopping $500 to $1,000, the fact that it
lasts so long means that the average annual cost can be under $100cheaper than condoms.

Depo Shot: Each shot costs between $35 and $75, and sometimes comes with an
additional doctor’s visit fee of $20 to $40. That means each year, users
can expect to pay between $220 and $460.

Vasectomies costs between $350 to $1,000. Sterilization for women costs
between $1,500 and $6,000. But since it’s permanent, the cost per year
over the long-term is lower. For example, if a 35-year-old women gets
sterilized, it prevents her from getting pregnant for the rest of her
fertile years. Spreading the cost of a $4,000 procedure over 20 years
brings the annual expense down to $200. Similarly, if her partner gets a
$600 vasectomy, the annual cost averages out to just $30 over 20 years.

NuvaRing: costs between $15 and $50 per month, the same as other hormonal methods.
Since it requires a prescription, users might also have to pay for an
office visit, which can cost between $35 to $200. Excluding that visit,
the ring costs between $160 to $600 per year.

A pack of three sponges cost about $15. For a couple that uses two
sponges per week, the annual cost averages out to about $500 a year."


Quoting resamerie:

 Same here. I hope all these people behind this will be just as happy paying more for PA when all these unwanted children start popping out due to those that can't afford full price for birth control.


Quoting TwinmomAlicia:

That's tough. I personally do not believe in abortion, but Planned Parenthood also provides cervical cancer screening, HIV and other STD testing, and low-cost birth control for those without health insurance. Where are people going to go for those services now?

 



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Stephanie329
by Ruby Member on Aug. 19, 2011 at 9:18 AM
I stopped reading here:

“Even though these clinics are family planning clinics, so there’s not actually any abortions being provided at the clinics that are closing their doors, there’s no mistake that these are abortion-minded clinics that are sending women to abortion clinics,” Seago commented.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Stephanie329
by Ruby Member on Aug. 19, 2011 at 9:20 AM
People do pay for their own abortions.

Quoting denise3680:

I always thought that PP was way more than just abortions, am I wrong about that??  Is this really going to stop people from getting abortions?  I mean how is this helping those who rely on these types of facilities for medical necessities other than abortions?  I think people should pay for their own abortions but I do not think it wise to take things away from people who are in need.

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
resamerie
by Platinum Member on Aug. 19, 2011 at 12:14 PM

 For some people that barely HAVE $15 by the end of the month after paying bills or no job at all, they can get birth control for a YEAR for the price of those 3 sponges at PP not to mention all the check-ups that go with it. PP is the way I found out I had pre-cancer cells on my cervix years ago when I couldn't AFFORD to go anywhere else. I think the whole shabang cost me about $15. Pap, breast exam, etc. and a years worth of bc pills. There was no other place like that around me. If not for them I'd probably have full blown cervical cancer and 5 kids by now seeing how that was over 25 years ago. I don't believe in abortion for myself. Don't want one then don't have one. But not every PP does abortions and the ones that do it makes up a very minute part of the services they do. I guess you're one of those that doesn't know what it's like to ever be poor and seeing a gynecologist is a luxury. Pfft. 

Quoting LoriKeet:

And I am SOOO tired of heaaring how people can't afford a few dollars a month for birth control, but can bring a child into the world that requires food, clothing and shelter for at least 18 years!!  Where is the logic in that?!  Oh, I can't afford birth control, so I'll just get preganant, because I have needs, and can't make my boyfriend wear a FREE condom, and then I'll have an abortion, because that's so much better for my body.  Ugh!

http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/alpha-consumer/2010/08/27/the-real-cost-of-birth-control-

"A couple using no birth control has an 85 percent chance of becoming pregnant in one year. The Agriculture Department estimates that on average, middle-income couples spend around $12,500 per year per child.

On an annual basis, that means the Pill costs between $160 to $600.

The American Pregnancy Association reports that one cervical cap, which lasts up to two years, costs between $15 and $50.

Some health clinics distribute condoms for free. Otherwise, on average, they cost between 20 cents and $2.50 each.

Diaphragms require a doctor’s exam, which can cost anywhere from $20 to $200. Planned Parenthood estimates that the cost for the diaphragm itself, which lasts up to two years, falls between $15 to $75.

Planned Parenthood estimates that out of every 100 couples who rely on fertility awareness, between 12 and 25 will become pregnant. The Cost: Free.

IUDs: This T-shaped device, which in some cases also contains hormones, is placed in the uterus by a health care provider. It lasts up to 12 years and is 99 percent effective. The Cost: While the upfront cost is a whopping $500 to $1,000, the fact that it lasts so long means that the average annual cost can be under $100cheaper than condoms.

Depo Shot: Each shot costs between $35 and $75, and sometimes comes with an additional doctor’s visit fee of $20 to $40. That means each year, users can expect to pay between $220 and $460.

Vasectomies costs between $350 to $1,000. Sterilization for women costs between $1,500 and $6,000. But since it’s permanent, the cost per year over the long-term is lower. For example, if a 35-year-old women gets sterilized, it prevents her from getting pregnant for the rest of her fertile years. Spreading the cost of a $4,000 procedure over 20 years brings the annual expense down to $200. Similarly, if her partner gets a $600 vasectomy, the annual cost averages out to just $30 over 20 years.

NuvaRing: costs between $15 and $50 per month, the same as other hormonal methods. Since it requires a prescription, users might also have to pay for an office visit, which can cost between $35 to $200. Excluding that visit, the ring costs between $160 to $600 per year.

A pack of three sponges cost about $15. For a couple that uses two sponges per week, the annual cost averages out to about $500 a year."

 

Quoting resamerie:

 Same here. I hope all these people behind this will be just as happy paying more for PA when all these unwanted children start popping out due to those that can't afford full price for birth control.

Quoting TwinmomAlicia:

That's tough. I personally do not believe in abortion, but Planned Parenthood also provides cervical cancer screening, HIV and other STD testing, and low-cost birth control for those without health insurance. Where are people going to go for those services now?

 


 

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