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[Copyright Question] That's my husband and daughter!

Posted by on Sep. 14, 2011 at 12:15 PM
  • 5 Replies

So I got the strangest email today from a friend of mine I haven't talked to in awhile, and he alerted me to this.

Ok, so, someone wrote an article for this company, and this company took a pic off of our Flickr account and used it in an article about men with low testosterone. Hilarious? Sure. Shitty picture? Yes. (They couldn't even edit his laser eyes! Must be from his "low testosterone.")

But is this legal? Don't they at least need to notify the photographer regarding the use of pics when humans are in them... like, my husband and daughter!? We have the rights on DD's Flickr account set to creative commons, but I thought that involved notification when human subjects are in pics.

BTW, DH wanted me to assure you ladies that his testosterone levels are "just peachy."

(Haha. Some comments are hilarious!)

Got kids? You're more likely to have low testosterone

Got kids? You're more likely to have low testosterone

In the animal kingdom, it’s no secret that the most masculine male usually gets the girl; big bodies, large antlers, and deep voice calls tend to drive the ladies wild. But once the guy gets the girl and the girl gets pregnant, high levels of testosterone aren’t necessarily a good thing. According to new research in PNAS, males with high testosterone are more likely to become fathers, but once they have children, their testosterone levels fall dramatically.

In animals like birds where paternal care is common, males tend to downregulate their testosterone production once babies are born. Humans, however, are one of the few mammalian species in which males help raise the offspring. Since this is a rare trait among mammals, we don’t know much about our reproductive strategies when it comes to testosterone.

This longitudinal study used data from a long-term dataset of males living in Cebu City in the Philippines. The researchers measured morning and evening salivary testosterone levels in 642 21-year old males. Then, when the guys were 26, these measurements were taken again; by that time, many were married and had children.

Not surprisingly, men with higher testosterone levels at 21 years of age were more likely to be married and have children five years later. 

It's very common for men to undergo age-related decreases in testosterone, and most of the men in the study did have slightly lower testosterone levels by the time they were 26. However, men who had children by the time the second measurement was taken had much greater decreases than those that were still single and those that had gotten married but not had children.

Dads with newborns were most strongly affected; new fathers whose kids were less than a month old had the largest drops in testosterone production, when compared to their baseline. These hormone changes weren’t accounted for by their sleep quality, stress levels, or time budgeting.

Fathers that were more involved in child care and spent more time with their children had lower testosterone levels than those that didn’t spend much time caring for their kids and those that were completely uninvolved with their children. Furthermore, the baseline testosterone measurement taken at 21 years of age was completely unrelated to how invested the fathers were in their children’s care five years later. Taken together, this strongly suggests that caring for his kids can actually suppress a father’s testosterone production.

While testosterone may help attract females, it can be detrimental to a relationship’s stability. In previous research, men with high testosterone levels were more likely to have marital problems, and less likely to feel empathy when an infant cries. It’s likely that the down-regulation of testosterone production seen here is an evolutionary adaptation to increase reproductive success. A lot of testosterone may help get the girl, but a little less of it may help raise the family.

PNAS, 2011. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1105403108  (About DOIs).

slightlyperfect

by on Sep. 14, 2011 at 12:15 PM
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Replies (1-5):
mamaof2angles
by on Sep. 14, 2011 at 12:18 PM
I would think so not 100% certain, I know for Spina Bifida conferance AND school I SIGN a RELEASE for them to use my childerns pictures I would really look into that check Flickas(sp) TOS and read the fine print. (By the way CUTIE!)
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2hotTaco
by on Sep. 14, 2011 at 12:25 PM

What considerations have been given to copyright?

 

We offer the ability for you to associate a Creative Commons licence with one or all of your photos. You can find out more on this page.

If you see your work in someone else's photostream, please submit a Notice of Infringement to the Yahoo! Copyright Team. Information on how to do this correctly is here, and there's a link in the footer.

 

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I've found my photos on someone else's website, what do I do?

There are a few ways that your photo might be displayed outside of Flickr, but still hosted here. Some of the ways include:

 

  • Blogs
  • Tag search applications
  • Web-based games (often fun memory based programs)
  • Screen savers (displaying most recent uploads, or photos from Explore, etc.)
  • Desktop photo display widgets (like Apple's Dashboard or Yahoo! Widgets)

Through the Flickr API, it is possible to construct such websites and applications that query Flickr's publicly available photos via tags or user ID and build dynamic content that displays photos in interesting ways. If they are properly using the Flickr API and abiding by the requirements, the photo as seen on the page will link back to the photo page as it is found in your photostream and adhere to the API’s Terms of Use. The actual image itself is not hosted on that site, but the display will probably look different than what you are used to.

Some people are not comfortable with this, and we understand that. To that end, we allow our members to opt-out of API applications that search for text, tags, or your username and email address; your images may still show up in other types of API requests, however, so long as they are public and safe on Flickr. Your photos will still be searchable on Flickr.com and you will still be able to use third party sites for your own stream if you give them permission via the authorization process. Separate from the API search opt-out, we offer the opportunity for members to hide the 'Blog This' button above your images. This will prevent people from using Flickr's integrated blogging feature found above a photo, though it is not a guarantee that your photo will not be blogged manually.

Note: There are a few instances where your image may be hosted on Flickr, but someone has just linked to the static image element and not through to your photostream itself. This is against the Flickr Community Guidelines. If you have questions about that, feel free to drop us a note via Get Help.

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SlightlyPerfect
by Silver Member on Sep. 14, 2011 at 12:29 PM

Thanks. It's a static image hosted on the site's servers, not Flickr, so that helps.

Quoting 2hotTaco:,

Through the Flickr API, it is possible to construct such websites and applications that query Flickr's publicly available photos via tags or user ID and build dynamic content that displays photos in interesting ways. If they are properly using the Flickr API and abiding by the requirements, the photo as seen on the page will link back to the photo page as it is found in your photostream and adhere to the API’s Terms of Use. The actual image itself is not hosted on that site, but the display will probably look different than what you are used to.


slightlyperfect

seans_mammabear
by Member on Sep. 14, 2011 at 12:30 PM

if he didn't sign a model release you might want to get an entertainment attorney and find out what you can do....

highlandmum
by Bronze Member on Sep. 14, 2011 at 12:33 PM

 With my understanding if you use a Creative Commons licenses you are out of luck.  The purpose of this licenses is to allow the distribution of copyrighted works.

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