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Doctor tries to embarrass teenage girl into getting liposuction

Posted by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 10:20 AM
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2 moms liked this

My Doctor Tried To Guilt Me Into Getting Liposuction

Teen Liposuction: 'All About My Belly Fat (And Yours!)'

Belly


“You know, I can do a quick liquid liposuction to take care of that,” the doctor said. He was pointing at my belly fat... and I was mortified. I was in the dermatologist’s office to talk to him about removing a mole -- not to get my belly fat sucked away.

I pulled my jacket around me. “Yeah... Well... I just started going to the gym. I’ll probably lose that in a couple months.” I forced the sides of my face up into an awkward smile -- one there was no way I could feel. The doctor’s attendant half shrugged at me, making it clear she didn’t want to get involved.

Completely oblivious to the look of absolute horror on my face Dr. FeelGood continued to make me feel horrible, saying, “With your body type that kind of belly fat isn’t going anywhere. You’re a big girl,” he clarified -- as if that thought had never crossed my mind before.

I looked down at my tummy, amazed that I was still actually physically in the room. It felt like I had floated away, escaping my daytime nightmare by air. But, no. I was still there, being made to feel horrible even when my health was perfectly fine.

So, just like in every AA meeting you’ve ever seen on TV, let me say: “Hi. My name is Abiola and I have belly fat.”

This wasn’t always the case.

I never had washboard abs or anything that would put me in the Sports Illustrated "Swimsuit Issue." I did, however, have a smaller tummy that was easily sucked in, and that, my friends, was close enough for me. I could suck my stomach in for hours, no Spanx or other gadgets needed to give the grand illusion of flatness.

Unfortunately that was 20 pounds and two slices of pizza ago. Now, my tummy is, well, pudgy. But, hey, I have a pretty face, right?

And I wasn’t lying to the doctor. I did join a gym. My goal was (and is!) to get healthy rather than to get skinny. I almost forgot that when he pointed out the benefits of lipo.

So what happened next? Did the doctor finally get the clue and leave me alone? Nope. He actually leaned over and poked me in the belly. Poked. Me.

“I can get rid of that so quickly that you’ll be in a bikini by summertime,” he said.

“AHEM!’ The doctor’s assistant loudly cleared her voice. It seemed like their inside code for when he was saying or doing something inappropriate.

Her secret signal worked because he dropped his jabbing hand abruptly. The quick motion snapped me out of the shy, insecure girl I used to be, the one who would have been crying from his insults, and reminded me of the confident woman I’ve become.

I stood up and remembered that nobody, no matter what, has the right to make me feel bad about myself.

“Thank you but no thank you,” I said. “Maybe I’ll lose my belly fat in the gym and maybe I won’t. Either way it’s fine because my tummy is a part of me and I love it because I love me.”

The doctor grumbled something about his next appointment as he made his way out of the room.

His assistant smiled up at me. “You’re beautiful,” she said.

And deep down, I know that’s true.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/03/teen-self-esteeem-all-abo_n_1318394.html

by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 10:20 AM
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Replies (1-10):
futureshock
by Ruby Member on Mar. 4, 2012 at 10:21 AM

This has nothing to do with health, that is what makes it so bad in my opinion.

1proudmomma10
by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 10:31 AM
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I can never truly appreciate a "doctor" unless his/her work pertains to the health and well being of a patient.  Plastic surgeons in my opinion are only worthy of their work when they put it to use in situations of reconstruction after an accident or an unnatural deformity to the body.  It's kind of dissapointing to see how far some would go in decieving and degrading another person in order to benefit themselves financially--such as this situation in the article  

Quoting futureshock:

This has nothing to do with health, that is what makes it so bad in my opinion.


futureshock
by Ruby Member on Mar. 4, 2012 at 10:42 AM


Quoting 1proudmomma10:

I can never truly appreciate a "doctor" unless his/her work pertains to the health and well being of a patient.  Plastic surgeons in my opinion are only worthy of their work when they put it to use in situations of reconstruction after an accident or an unnatural deformity to the body.  It's kind of dissapointing to see how far some would go in decieving and degrading another person in order to benefit themselves financially--such as this situation in the article  

Quoting futureshock:

This has nothing to do with health, that is what makes it so bad in my opinion.


Well said. :)

FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Mar. 4, 2012 at 10:47 AM

I didn't see where it mentioned the age of this patient.  Not that it matters but the headline declares 'teen'.

This doctor was out of line and we all know it.  We also know that many doctors act this way.  It is, after all, more acceptable to go under the knife, so to speak, to get rid of that ugliness than it is to be healthy.  Or to go to a gym, work out at home, eat right, etc.  Forget all of that.  Just suck it out and put on that bikini.  THAT is what is important!  

Ugh!

Not to mention the $$$ signs that are seen by many who profess to be doing it for the good of others. 

futureshock
by Ruby Member on Mar. 4, 2012 at 10:54 AM


Quoting FromAtoZ:

I didn't see where it mentioned the age of this patient.  Not that it matters but the headline declares 'teen'.

This doctor was out of line and we all know it.  We also know that many doctors act this way.  It is, after all, more acceptable to go under the knife, so to speak, to get rid of that ugliness than it is to be healthy.  Or to go to a gym, work out at home, eat right, etc.  Forget all of that.  Just suck it out and put on that bikini.  THAT is what is important!  

Ugh!

Not to mention the $$$ signs that are seen by many who profess to be doing it for the good of others. 

That is why the title says teenager and not a specific age.

Lizardannie1966
by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 10:56 AM

Someone desperately needs to do more than "ahem" every time this doctor sticks his foot in his mouth.

Some doctors truly possess that famous "bed-side manner" and others simply need to get their heads out of their asses and learn tact....couth...respect....etc...etc... 

Not_A_Native
by Bronze Member on Mar. 4, 2012 at 10:57 AM
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A couple things.

Belly fat IS a health risk.  This has been proven (more than once) to affect heart health.

Two.  This was a plastic surgeon, so yeah, they will say things like that.  They want you to be aware of options.  And chances are they aren't your "regular" doctor, so they don't know if this is a longtime thing, or just a fluke.  I had a doctor talk about laser resurfacing to get rid of fine lines when I had a mole removed.  I thanked him, and said no thanks, end of story.  Didn't get all worked up about it.

Three, of COURSE any person will try to "upsell."  If you go to buy a used car, they'll try to talk you into a new one.  If you go to a brake shop, your car will need brakes (and hey maybe some tires too).  If you go to McDonalds, they'll ask if you want fries with that.

Why do people get SOOO worked up about weight, and so defensive when they have too much of it?  It's not good for you, everyone knows it, and everyone knows "what" to do (eat less, exercise more), but we don't do it.  Ok fine.  Let it go, "own" your decision ("your" as in general population) to be overweight if you so choose.

Lizardannie1966
by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 11:03 AM
1 mom liked this

This isn't about the right/wrong of the medical advice the doctor was giving.

It was about HOW it was given and yes, many doctors fail miserably when it comes to tactful approaches.

Otherwise, his nurse would not feel the need to "ahem" to pull this man back a little. 

Quoting Not_A_Native:

A couple things.

Belly fat IS a health risk.  This has been proven (more than once) to affect heart health.

Two.  This was a plastic surgeon, so yeah, they will say things like that.  They want you to be aware of options.  And chances are they aren't your "regular" doctor, so they don't know if this is a longtime thing, or just a fluke.  I had a doctor talk about laser resurfacing to get rid of fine lines when I had a mole removed.  I thanked him, and said no thanks, end of story.  Didn't get all worked up about it.

Three, of COURSE any person will try to "upsell."  If you go to buy a used car, they'll try to talk you into a new one.  If you go to a brake shop, your car will need brakes (and hey maybe some tires too).  If you go to McDonalds, they'll ask if you want fries with that.

Why do people get SOOO worked up about weight, and so defensive when they have too much of it?  It's not good for you, everyone knows it, and everyone knows "what" to do (eat less, exercise more), but we don't do it.  Ok fine.  Let it go, "own" your decision ("your" as in general population) to be overweight if you so choose.

 

Not_A_Native
by Bronze Member on Mar. 4, 2012 at 11:10 AM

Yeah, ok, he wasn't tactful.  Many doctors aren't, especially specialists (my opinion based on doctors I have seen).  I stand by my comment - people get way too defensive about their weight.

Bieg9093
by on Mar. 4, 2012 at 11:12 AM

 I wonder if the doc is an aspie?  It seems like he certainly lacks certain filters and can't read social cues.

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