• In the Spotlight:
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

"Extreme" restaurants and social policy

Posted by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 11:48 AM
  • 10 Replies

One of the lead stories this morning on Yahoo! is about a womancollapsing while eating a "bypass burger" at the "heart attack grill."

Quote:

The Heart Attack Grill offers free meals to any customer who weighs over 350 pounds and features a butterfat milkshake, nonfiltered cigarettes, "flatliner" fries and four burgers, each rated on an ascending scale of "a single bypass" to the "quadruple bypass."
http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow/another-heart-attack-grill-customer-collapses-while-eating-191647836.html

With obesity at an epidemic level (I am myself, obese, and proud of losing 22 lbs in the past 6 weeks!) and heart disease, diabetes and other ailments costing society so much money, is there a rightful place in society for establishments that cater specifically to glutttony?

Should the government have a right to limit the number of calories on a plate?

What, if any, liabilty should places like this bear?

I do not blame my condition on anything but my own overconsumption of food and lack of activity.  I don't "need" the government to save me from places like the "heart attack grill," but I do question why such places exist.  Thoughts?


by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 11:48 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
Tanya93
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 11:52 AM


Quoting Themis_Defleo:

One of the lead stories this morning on Yahoo! is about a womancollapsing while eating a "bypass burger" at the "heart attack grill."



Quote:

The Heart Attack Grill offers free meals to any customer who weighs over 350 pounds and features a butterfat milkshake, nonfiltered cigarettes, "flatliner" fries and four burgers, each rated on an ascending scale of "a single bypass" to the "quadruple bypass."
http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow/another-heart-attack-grill-customer-collapses-while-eating-191647836.html

With obesity at an epidemic level (I am myself, obese, and proud of losing 22 lbs in the past 6 weeks!) and heart disease, diabetes and other ailments costing society so much money, is there a rightful place in society for establishments that cater specifically to glutttony?

Yes.  No one is forced at these restaurants


Should the government have a right to limit the number of calories on a plate?


In a private business?  No.   I can see it somewhat with the school meal programs, but in a personally owned business?

What, if any, liabilty should places like this bear?


None.   Did they lie?   Did they force it?

I do not blame my condition on anything but my own overconsumption of food and lack of activity.  I don't "need" the government to save me from places like the "heart attack grill," but I do question why such places exist.  Thoughts?


People should be free serve whatever foods they want in their business.

rfurlongg
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 11:53 AM
2 moms liked this
Congrats on loosing 22lbs!!
The restaurant should not hold liability. No one held a gun to her head. Although I question why create such a dangerous gimmicky restaurant. While legally they should not hold liability, morally I feel they have blood on their hands.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Themis_Defleo
by Bronze Member on Apr. 25, 2012 at 11:59 AM

Thank you!  It feels so good!  My knees feel better and I feel better about myself, too.

I agree with your response.

I personally do not understand the draw of this kind of restaurant - nor the creation of 5-lb. cheese sandwiches that are "free" if you consume them in one hour, but I think that people who are inclined to engage in eating "heart attack on a plate" meals should bear the responsibility for the results.

I suppose that there really is no difference between "heart attack grill" and "golden corral." when it comes right down to it.  Neither pretends that gorging oneself is a healthy practice. 

I wonder if the restaurants has a salad bar ;)


Quoting rfurlongg:

Congrats on loosing 22lbs!!
The restaurant should not hold liability. No one held a gun to her head. Although I question why create such a dangerous gimmicky restaurant. While legally they should not hold liability, morally I feel they have blood on their hands.


Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 11:59 AM


Quoting rfurlongg:

Congrats on loosing 22lbs!!
The restaurant should not hold liability. No one held a gun to her head. Although I question why create such a dangerous gimmicky restaurant. While legally they should not hold liability, morally I feel they have blood on their hands.

I agree

fatcat0908
by Bronze Member on Apr. 25, 2012 at 12:02 PM
Exactly, if they stopped this, what's next? Preventing places like wing joints from serving atomic wings? Those too pose a health threat if you have underlying conditions.


Quoting Tanya93:



Quoting Themis_Defleo:

One of the lead stories this morning on Yahoo! is about a womancollapsing while eating a "bypass burger" at the "heart attack grill."



Quote:

The Heart Attack Grill offers free meals to any customer who weighs over 350 pounds and features a butterfat milkshake, nonfiltered cigarettes, "flatliner" fries and four burgers, each rated on an ascending scale of "a single bypass" to the "quadruple bypass."
http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow/another-heart-attack-grill-customer-collapses-while-eating-191647836.html

With obesity at an epidemic level (I am myself, obese, and proud of losing 22 lbs in the past 6 weeks!) and heart disease, diabetes and other ailments costing society so much money, is there a rightful place in society for establishments that cater specifically to glutttony?

Yes.  No one is forced at these restaurants


Should the government have a right to limit the number of calories on a plate?


In a private business?  No.   I can see it somewhat with the school meal programs, but in a personally owned business?

What, if any, liabilty should places like this bear?


None.   Did they lie?   Did they force it?

I do not blame my condition on anything but my own overconsumption of food and lack of activity.  I don't "need" the government to save me from places like the "heart attack grill," but I do question why such places exist.  Thoughts?


People should be free serve whatever foods they want in their business.


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Peanutx3
by Ruby Member on Apr. 25, 2012 at 12:02 PM

This is where that pesky thing of personal responsibility comes into play.

SuperChicken
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 12:04 PM

Congrats on the weight loss!

I don't think the establishment holds any responsbilitiy.  Nobody is forced to eat there.

I don't think it's a smart business practice though.   There's a lot of people over 350, that's a lot of free dinners.

Themis_Defleo
by Bronze Member on Apr. 25, 2012 at 12:12 PM

To all who have posted - I agree, we are personally responsible for our health.


Change it up, though - Hypothetically, if we go to a single payor health care system, other people's health issues become much more of a problem for all of us.  Does that change the equation?  Why or why not? (I suppose a s/o of the thread about denying treatment to diabetics who are non-compliant).

Peanutx3
by Ruby Member on Apr. 25, 2012 at 12:16 PM

I still think we as individuals need to be responsible for our own actions.  I don't like the idea of limiting others because a few are not responsible with their choices.

Quoting Themis_Defleo:

To all who have posted - I agree, we are personally responsible for our health.


Change it up, though - Hypothetically, if we go to a single payor health care system, other people's health issues become much more of a problem for all of us.  Does that change the equation?  Why or why not? (I suppose a s/o of the thread about denying treatment to diabetics who are non-compliant).


Debmomto2girls
by on Apr. 25, 2012 at 12:16 PM

 What about fast food joints? Americans overconsume food and like fattening food. If they didn't, they palces would not be in business.

And yes, I think people who are morbidly obese and have conditions due to their weight shouldhave to pay a higher premium than those who aren't. They shouldnever be denied service.  Or give people who are a healthy weight a break on what they pay.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)