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Bake sales, the calorie-laden standby cash-strapped classrooms, PTAs and booster clubs rely on, will be outlawed from public schools as of Aug. 1 as part of new no-nonsense nutrition standards, forcing fundraisers back to the blackboard to cook up alternative ways to raise money for kids.

At a minimum, the nosh clampdown targets so-called “competitive” foods — those sold or served during the school day in hallways, cafeterias, stores and vending machines outside the regular lunch program, including bake sales, holiday parties and treats dished out to reward academic achievement. But state officials are pushing schools to expand the ban 24/7 to include evening, weekend and community events such as banquets, door-to-door candy sales and football games.

The Departments of Public Health and Education contend clearing tables of even whole milk and white bread is necessary to combat an obesity epidemic affecting a third of the state’s 1.5 million students. But parents argue crudites won’t cut it when the bills come due on athletic equipment and band trips.

“If you want to make a quick $250, you hold a bake sale,” said Sandy Malec, vice president of the Horace Mann Elementary School PTO in Newtonville.

Maura Dawley of Scituate said the candy bars her 15-year-old son brought to school to help pay for a youth group trip to Guatemala “sold like wildfire.” She worries the ban “would seriously affect the bottom line of the PTOs.

“The goal is to raise money,” Dawley said. “You’re going to be able to sell pizza. You’re not going to get that selling apples and bananas. It’s silly.”

Food fundraisers have helped send the renowned Danvers High School Falcon Band to the Rose Bowl Parade in California and the 70th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor in Honolulu. Danvers Parents for Music Education sell fudge because “it still works,” said the group’s president, Matthew Desmond. “Even my wife will buy it.”

Middleboro School Committeeman Brian Giovanoni, whose board will discuss the mandatory meal makeover Thursday night, said, “My concern is we’re regulating what people can eat, and I have a problem with that. I respect the state for what they’re trying to do, but I think they’ve gone off the deep end. I don’t want someone telling me how to do my job as a parent. ... Is the commonwealth of Massachusetts saying our parents are bad parents?”

No, insists Dr. Lauren Smith, DPH’s medical director.

“We’re not trying to get into anyone’s lunch box,” Smith told the Herald. “We know that schools need those clubs and resources. We want them to be sure and have them, but to do them a different way. We have some incredibly innovative, talented folks in schools who are already doing some impressive things, who serve as incontrovertible evidence that, yes, you can do this, and be successful at it.”

State Sen. Susan Fargo (D-Lincoln), chairwoman of the Joint Committee on Public Health, said the problem of overweight children has reached “crisis” proportions.

“If we didn’t have so many kids that were obese, we could have let things go,” Fargo said.

“But,” she added, “this is a major public health problem and these kids deserve a chance at a good, long healthy life.”

http://www.bostonherald.com/news/regional/view/20220507parents_rules_half-baked_states_junk_food_ban_could_take_bite_out_of_school_fundraisers/srvc=home&position=0

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I've been to several school carnivals that have cake walks and bake sales.  There is nothing wrong with sweet goodies in moderation.  Let kids be kids! 

by on May. 7, 2012 at 3:32 PM
Replies (51-60):
gdiamante
by Silver Member on May. 8, 2012 at 12:51 PM

Our school partnered with a local SmartCard program, and gets part of the proceeds. We also had a 5K race two weeks ago to raise money.

Quoting Ziva65:

Quoting GotSomeKids:

I don't think it's a big deal, even for
individual schools, as long as it's not their only form of fundraising. 
I also think nutrition should be taught through the school PE
programs.  I successfully got our school to stop fundraising with cookie
dough.  We instead do a read-a-thon to help raise money for the school
and celebrate literacy.




Right, we have a lot of dine and donates at local restaurants. My son had a high school fundraiser with preordered jamba juice, and did really well. They've also had car wash fundraisers. they can still have great fundraisers even without cupcakes.


rocketracer
by Silver Member on May. 8, 2012 at 12:58 PM


Quoting Ziva65:

Quoting GotSomeKids:

I don't think it's a big deal, even for
individual schools, as long as it's not their only form of fundraising. 
I also think nutrition should be taught through the school PE
programs.  I successfully got our school to stop fundraising with cookie
dough.  We instead do a read-a-thon to help raise money for the school
and celebrate literacy.




Right, we have a lot of dine and donates at local restaurants. My son had a high school fundraiser with preordered jamba juice, and did really well. They've also had car wash fundraisers. they can still have great fundraisers even without cupcakes.

Jamba Juice? The Jamba Juice that is sold in Jamba Juice stores? 

I always thought the sweet part of the drink was from the natural fruit sweetness and maybe a little bit of sugar, but get this: there are 59 grams of sugar in a 16-ounce version of Banana Berry! Not only that, you'll find 67 grams of carbs and 280 calories in that small drink. Get a power-sized serving (30 ounces) and you're looking at 600 calories, 142 grams of carbs, and 125 grams of sugar. But hey, only 1.5 grams of fat in that size.

The Orange Dream Machine is another Jamba favorite of mine, but it's just as loaded with sugars and carbs. The orange juice, orange sherbet and soymilk combo goes smoothly down the throat and into a waiting belly, but it comes with a small price: 100 grams of sugar per 24 ounce serving. With 520 calories and 106 grams of carbs, you can count that as a pretty hefty breakfast.

The Peanut Butter Mo'od is a Jamba Juice specialty that will boost your protein intake for the day which is great if you're building muscles. Although not as high in sugar per ounce as some of the other drinks, you are sure to feel full after drinking this smoothie: a 24 oz "original" serving size boasts 840 calories and 25 grams of protein, 139 carb grams, and 25 grams of fat. Push it to a "power" 30 ounce and you can count on 1170 calories!

rocketracer
by Silver Member on May. 8, 2012 at 1:02 PM

Schools and sports teams used to get a percentage of grocery sales from what I spent at the grocery.  However, I just received an email that the program is changing.  Teams will only get a percentage of the grocery sales based on whether you purchase certain foods.  I haven't seen the list of acceptable foods.  I don't know if this affects the percentage given to schools.      

Quoting gdiamante:

Our school partnered with a local SmartCard program, and gets part of the proceeds. We also had a 5K race two weeks ago to raise money.

Quoting Ziva65:

Quoting GotSomeKids:

I don't think it's a big deal, even for
individual schools, as long as it's not their only form of fundraising. 
I also think nutrition should be taught through the school PE
programs.  I successfully got our school to stop fundraising with cookie
dough.  We instead do a read-a-thon to help raise money for the school
and celebrate literacy.




Right, we have a lot of dine and donates at local restaurants. My son had a high school fundraiser with preordered jamba juice, and did really well. They've also had car wash fundraisers. they can still have great fundraisers even without cupcakes.

 


Traci_Momof2
by Silver Member on May. 8, 2012 at 1:21 PM
1 mom liked this

If they want to curb the obesity epidemic, I personally think they are barking up the wrong tree.  It's not the food that is the issue so much as the lack of movement.  We (parents and schools alike) need to get our kids out and moving.  We can't let / force them to sit for so many hours a day.  If they were moving then they would have no problem burning off the extra calories from that candy bar or that brownie.  We can put as much healthy food into them as we want to, if they aren't getting up each day and moving around, they are not going to be healthy.

It does absolutely no good to solve the food issue if we don't first solve the "lazy ass" issue.

Ziva65
by Gold Member on May. 8, 2012 at 1:40 PM
Quoting rocketracer:


It's a favorite of kids, and an alternative to a cupcake. My sons class made over $500 just on Jamba juice... You don't have to select the high cal high sugar ones. Just like one can select a salad at McDonalds...
Traci_Momof2
by Silver Member on May. 8, 2012 at 1:42 PM
2 moms liked this


Quoting TruthSeeker.:

 

Quoting eema.gray:

How about this:  One day a month, maybe the first Monday of the month but it could be any other day, the parents of children celebrating birthdays that month provide a birthday lunch for the class, including a cake or cupcakes.

PTO/A's are welcome to hold bake sales, off school property, on weekends or after school, but nothing during school hours, on school property.

Make over the school lunch menu.

Every child, except for medical needs, must participate in 30 minutes of physical activity (not games that involve a great deal of standing around like kickball) every single school day.

Emphasize the physical activity part.  That alone will do a lot more good then whole sale bans on bake sales!

 I'm on board with every thing here accept the 30 min of exercise/activities. It's not the schools job to make your children exercise. It's yours. Schools have a hard enough time squeezing in everything they Have to that finding and extra half hour devoted solely to exercise might not be an option for all schools.  At my daughters school they have a half hour of recess everyday and I would hate to see them take that away so they can do joined calisthenics. 

How about combining the learning and the exercise together?  Take the class outside.  Have each student measure a 2 foot length of something (sidewalk, track, whatever).  You have 25 students who measured 2 feet each - how long is that?  Now have students run the 50 feet and other students time them.  Then switch.  How fast did you run based on distance and time?

There, got them some exercise and completed the math lesson.  Also helped them get some sun exposure to build that Vit D.  Win, win, win all around.

rocketracer
by Silver Member on May. 8, 2012 at 1:42 PM


Quoting Ziva65:

Quoting rocketracer:


It's a favorite of kids, and an alternative to a cupcake. My sons class made over $500 just on Jamba juice... You don't have to select the high cal high sugar ones. Just like one can select a salad at McDonalds...

Yep, it's all about making good choices and moderation.  Do we need gov't to tell us what our decisions should be? 

Ziva65
by Gold Member on May. 8, 2012 at 1:46 PM
1 mom liked this
Quoting rocketracer:




I agree... I'm all for less government. the funny thing is, how far will this go? think about it, no white bread in lunches, a Twinkie hall monitor, I know it sounds ridiculous...but the bigger picture of this mandate is pretty laughable too.

I'm a wheat grass, and organic food nut.. But I don't care if someone else puts white bread in their kids sandwich, or sells cupcakes.
Ziva65
by Gold Member on May. 8, 2012 at 1:48 PM
Quoting Traci_Momof2:




I'm fine with it too. doesn't every school do the Presidential physical fitness thing? seems like my elementary age ones do that all year long, they only get out of it with an MD note.
Tanya93
by on May. 8, 2012 at 1:48 PM

They already had a school girl being told her lunch wasn't good enough, so they gave her chicken nuggets

Quoting Ziva65:

Quoting rocketracer:




I agree... I'm all for less government. the funny thing is, how far will this go? think about it, no white bread in lunches, a Twinkie hall monitor, I know it sounds ridiculous...but the bigger picture of this mandate is pretty laughable too.

I'm a wheat grass, and organic food nut.. But I don't care if someone else puts white bread in their kids sandwich, or sells cupcakes.


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