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Ok, so not an attack but I did just have the crap scared out of me.
Our neighbors had their pit on a tie out and my son was riding his big wheel past and the dog broke its collar and went straight after him. My son was screaming and pedaling for his life and there I am running down the road screaming "stop!! Don't move!!"
My daughter decides to run up and try to "help". So then I'm left with trying to keep two kids from getting bitten at the same time. Everyone is screaming and I'm trying to get ahold of the dog that is still barking, snarling, an lunging for my kids just as the neighbor finally comes out to rangle the dog.

Needless to say I'm still shaken up and nearly crapped my pants.

So, in your opinion what would have been the best way to handle this situation? What if they had gotten bitten? Should I report the dog as viscous? Should I just sit back, check my drawers, and hope it doesn't get loose again?


Different, but not less~Temple Grandin

by on May. 10, 2012 at 8:11 PM
Replies (21-30):
mcr17
by on May. 10, 2012 at 9:54 PM

sure they do.

Quoting katy_kay08:

Pit Bulls account for close to 60% of all fatal dog attacks each year and account for approx 81% of off property attacks.  


Quoting mcr17:

there arent as many pit bull attacks as you think, they are just the ones that are sensationalized the most.

Quoting katy_kay08:

It isn't the OPs job to shield the breed from the bad reputation they have.  The people not helping the breed are the ones that allow their dogs to become viscious.  

Ignoring the reality of how often these situations happen and how often it is a pit bull doesn't do anyone any favors.  

  

Quoting mcr17:

i think you should not perpetuate the sterotype that pitbulls are viscious. you are in no way helping the breed.





DivingDiva
by Gold Member on May. 10, 2012 at 9:55 PM

 

Quoting mcr17:

there arent as many pit bull attacks as you think, they are just the ones that are sensationalized the most.

 

shes not helping the reputation of the breed by immediately writing that it was a pit bull, she could have just as easily wrote "dog attack"

Quoting katy_kay08:

It isn't the OPs job to shield the breed from the bad reputation they have.  The people not helping the breed are the ones that allow their dogs to become viscious.  

Ignoring the reality of how often these situations happen and how often it is a pit bull doesn't do anyone any favors.  

  

Quoting mcr17:

i think you should not perpetuate the sterotype that pitbulls are viscious. you are in no way helping the breed.


 

People generally specify "pit bull" attack when a pit bull or pit bull mix is involved.  When another breed is involved in an attack, not so much.  There was recently a baby torn apart and killed by a family dog that was a golden retriever/lab mix.  I didn't see any reporting of the incident as "Golden Retriever Attack".  I wasn't hugely active on cm that week, so maybe I am mistaken? 

Themis_Defleo
by Bronze Member on May. 10, 2012 at 9:55 PM

I think the bully breeds are changing.  You have good breeders that select for even-tempered personalities and raise nanny dogs, and you have fighter breeders who select the dogs with aggressive temperaments and breed them together to get dogs that have a stronger bite instinct and fight instinct.

From the outside, the well-bred pits and the fight-bred pits look the same.  

I love the bully breeds, but training is only a part of the equation.  A pit that has been line-bred for aggression is a concern.

Quoting mcr17:

ugh.... pitbulls are not bred to be aggressive.ever hear of the term nanny dog? they are no more aggressive as a breed than a freaking golden retriever, its all about how you raise them.

Quoting NyonUzi:

yeah if they're raised with love and cuddles they will grow with family :) BUT human did breed them to be aggressive so its not much of the dogs fault he turned out like that :'( But I would call animal control too!!! who ever decide to own pits should know they need to spend time and teach them love!!! its like how the military have little training time after they come home from war zone they need to brought back to wrking with civilian and all ya know? so they should know better to watch them while the pits are out front to make sure the people around them is ok and the pits are confy there D: so i'll say call the animal place!!!

Quoting TruthSeeker.:

 

Quoting NWP:

I think you should report them. No one should treat a dog like that..and I certainly wouldn't let my kids play out front when it was on the chain.

 They've just started putting it out front on the chain over the last few weeks. It's been cooped up all winter inside.  I've petted it before when they first got it and it was around 6 months. I never thought it would become this snarling snapping scary dog. I had no reason before today to be afraid of it. I never allowed the children to go in the yard and pet it or go near it, but figured if it was chained then they were safe. Boy was I wrong!




mcr17
by on May. 10, 2012 at 9:55 PM

so theres only 1 breed of dog the size of a pitbull?


Quoting TruthSeeker.:

Quoting mcr17:

i think you should not perpetuate the sterotype that pitbulls are viscious. you are in no way helping the breed.



Why do you feel it perpetuates a stereotype? It wasn't a tea cup yorkie. I reported the type of dog so people would understand size in relation to how my son was riding. They were nearly nose to nose at one point with my son screaming hysterically.
I could care less about "helping a breed". If it's being viscious, it's being viscious. Period.


TruthSeeker.
by Milami on May. 10, 2012 at 9:56 PM
Quoting mcr17:



Pit was what it was. Most people know the size of pits.
TruthSeeker.
by Milami on May. 10, 2012 at 10:00 PM
Quoting DivingDiva:



The same neighbor also has a weimeryner(sp) and if it would have been him or the husky down the road I would have said the breed. Saying the breed, to me, gives reference to size. I don't say the medium size black dog down the road. I identify all dogs by breed if I know what breed it is. I thought this was normal. Is it not?
katy_kay08
by on May. 10, 2012 at 10:03 PM

2011 U.S. Dog Bite Fatality Statistics - DogsBite.org

Fatal Dog Attack Statistics
DogsBite.org recorded 31 fatal dog attacks in 2011.1 Citations of each victim's story are located on the Fatality Citations page. The last year the CDC released data about dog bite-related fatalities was 1998. Likely due to pressures from animal advocacy groups, the CDC stopped studying these deaths by dog breed. Since 1998, pit bulls alone have killed 181 U. S. citizens. The only other known entity, in addition to DogsBite.org, that tracks this vital data publicly isAnimal People.2
  • 31 U.S. fatal dog attacks occurred in 2011. Despite being regulated in Military Housing areas and over 650 U.S. cities, pit bulls led these attacks accounting for 71% (22). Pit bulls make up less than 5% of the total U.S. dog population.3
  • Notably in 2011, adult victims of fatal pit bull attacks more than doubled the number of child victims. Of the 22 total pit bull victims, 68% (15) fell between the ages of 32 to 76, and 32% (7) were ages 5 years and younger.
  • The year 2011 also marks an increase in pet pit bulls killing their owners. Of the 8 total instances this year in which a family dog inflicted fatal injury to its primary caretaker, the dog's owner, 88% (7) involved pet pit bulls.
  • Together, pit bulls (22) and rottweilers (4), the number two lethal dog breed, accounted for 84% of all fatal attacks in 2011. In the 7-year period from 2005 to 2011, this same combination accounted for 74% (157) of the total recorded deaths (213).
  • The breakdown between pit bulls and rottweilers is substantial over this 7-year period. From 2005 to 2011, pit bulls killed 128 Americans, about one citizen every 20 days, versus rottweilers, which killed 29; about one citizen every 88 days.
  • Annual data from 2011 shows that 58% (18) of the attacks occurred to adults (21 years and older) and 42% (13) occurred to children (11 years and younger). Of the children, 62% (8) occurred to ages 1 and younger.
  • 2011 data also shows that 39% (12) of the fatal incidents involved more than one dog; 26% (8) involved breeding on the dog owner's property either actively or in the recent past, and 6% (2) involved tethered dogs, down from 9% in 2010 and 19% in 2009.
  • Dog ownership information for 2011 shows that family dogs comprised 65% (20) of the attacks that resulted in death; 74% (23) of all incidents occurred on the dog owner's property and 29% (9) resulted in criminal charges, up from 15% in 2010.
  • The states of California and Texas led fatalities in 2011, each with 4 deaths; pit bulls and their mixes contributed to 88% (7) of the 8 deaths. North Carolina, New Mexico, South Carolina and Virginia each incurred 2 deaths.
  • See: Full news release.

-------


Pit Bulls Lead 'Bite' Counts Across U.S. Cities and Counties

Dog Biting Incidents: 2008 to 2012


DogsBite.org - Animal control departments in at least 24 U.S. states report that pit bulls are biting more than all other dog breeds. These states include: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Massachusetts, Maryland, Michigan, Nebraska, Nevada, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Utah and Wisconsin. The oft-quoted myth by pro-pit bull groups that pit bulls "do not bite more than other breeds" is categorically false. In addition to leading bite counts, the pit bull bite is also the most damaging, inflicting permanent and disfiguring injury.
katy_kay08
by on May. 10, 2012 at 10:05 PM

*shrug*  dismissing the concerns of people that fear your dog doesn't do anything to change perceptions.  

Quoting mcr17:

sure they do.

Quoting katy_kay08:

Pit Bulls account for close to 60% of all fatal dog attacks each year and account for approx 81% of off property attacks.  


Quoting mcr17:

there arent as many pit bull attacks as you think, they are just the ones that are sensationalized the most.

Quoting katy_kay08:

It isn't the OPs job to shield the breed from the bad reputation they have.  The people not helping the breed are the ones that allow their dogs to become viscious.  

Ignoring the reality of how often these situations happen and how often it is a pit bull doesn't do anyone any favors.  

  

Quoting mcr17:

i think you should not perpetuate the sterotype that pitbulls are viscious. you are in no way helping the breed.






DivingDiva
by Gold Member on May. 10, 2012 at 10:06 PM


Quoting TruthSeeker.:

Quoting DivingDiva:



The same neighbor also has a weimeryner(sp) and if it would have been him or the husky down the road I would have said the breed. Saying the breed, to me, gives reference to size. I don't say the medium size black dog down the road. I identify all dogs by breed if I know what breed it is. I thought this was normal. Is it not?


It's more usual for folks in general to specify "pit bull", maybe because it tends to be attention-grabbing.  You would honestly have titled this post "weimeraner attack" if that's the one that had scared your kids?

TruthSeeker.
by Milami on May. 10, 2012 at 10:10 PM
Quoting DivingDiva:



Statistically speaking, the weimeryner probably wouldn't have attacked but if it would have after looking up the correct spelling I would have still used the breed because it gives the visual. Weimeryners are huge!!
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