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Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

New York Plans to Ban Sale of Big Sizes of Sugary Drinks

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http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/31/nyregion/bloomberg-plans-a-ban-on-large-sugared-drinks.html


New York City plans to enact a far-reaching ban on the sale of large sodas and other sugary drinks at restaurants, movie theaters and street carts, in the most ambitious effort yet by the Bloomberg administration to combat rising obesity.

The proposed ban would affect virtually the entire menu of popular sugary drinks found in delis, fast-food franchises and even sports arenas, from energy drinks to pre-sweetened iced teas. The sale of any cup or bottle of sweetened drink larger than 16 fluid ounces — about the size of a medium coffee, and smaller than a common soda bottle — would be prohibited under the first-in-the-nation plan, which could take effect as soon as next March.

The measure would not apply to diet sodas, fruit juices, dairy-based drinks like milkshakes, or alcoholic beverages; it would not extend to beverages sold in grocery or convenience stores.

“Obesity is a nationwide problem, and all over the United States, public health officials are wringing their hands saying, ‘Oh, this is terrible,’ ” Mr. Bloomberg said in an interview on Wednesday in the Governor’s Room at City Hall.

“New York City is not about wringing your hands; it’s about doing something,” he said. “I think that’s what the public wants the mayor to do.”

A spokesman for the New York City Beverage Association, an arm of the soda industry’s national trade group, criticized the city’s proposal on Wednesday. The industry has clashed repeatedly with the city’s health department, saying it has unfairly singled out soda; industry groups have bought subway advertisements promoting their cause.

“The New York City health department’s unhealthy obsession with attacking soft drinks is again pushing them over the top,” the industry spokesman, Stefan Friedman, said. “It’s time for serious health professionals to move on and seek solutions that are going to actually curb obesity. These zealous proposals just distract from the hard work that needs to be done on this front.”

Mr. Bloomberg’s proposal requires the approval of the Board of Health, a step that is considered likely because the members are all appointed by him, and the board’s chairman is the city’s health commissioner, who joined the mayor in supporting the measure on Wednesday.

Mr. Bloomberg has made public health one of the top priorities of his lengthy tenure, and has championed a series of aggressive regulations, including bans on smoking in restaurants and parks, a prohibition against artificial trans fat in restaurant food and a requirement for health inspection grades to be posted in restaurant windows.

The measures have led to occasional derision of the mayor as Nanny Bloomberg, by those who view the restrictions as infringements on personal freedom. But many of the measures adopted in New York have become models for other cities, including restrictions on smoking and trans fats, as well as the use of graphic advertising to combat smoking and soda consumption, and the demand that chain restaurants post calorie contents next to prices.

In recent years, soda has emerged as a battleground in efforts to counter obesity. Across the nation, some school districts have banned the sale of soda in schools, and some cities have banned the sale of soda in public buildings.

In New York City, where more than half of adults are obese or overweight, Dr. Thomas Farley, the health commissioner, blames sweetened drinks for up to half of the increase in city obesity rates over the last 30 years. About a third of New Yorkers drink one or more sugary drinks a day, according to the city. Dr. Farley said the city had seen higher obesity rates in neighborhoods where soda consumption was more common.

The ban would not apply to drinks with fewer than 25 calories per 8-ounce serving, like zero-calorie Vitamin Waters and unsweetened iced teas, as well as diet sodas.

Restaurants, delis, movie theater and ballpark concessions would be affected, because they are regulated by the health department. Carts on sidewalks and in Central Park would also be included, but not vending machines or newsstands that serve only a smattering of fresh food items.

At fast-food chains, where sodas are often dispersed at self-serve fountains, restaurants would be required to hand out cup sizes of 16 ounces or less, regardless of whether a customer opts for a diet drink. But free refills — and additional drink purchases — would be allowed.

Full article here: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/31/nyregion/bloomberg-plans-a-ban-on-large-sugared-drinks.html


"The right to be heard does not include the right to be taken seriously."

by on May. 31, 2012 at 1:59 AM
Replies (21-30):
EllysMom1005
by Member on May. 31, 2012 at 8:52 AM
1 mom liked this


Quoting stacymomof2:

Sounds like a waste of time IMO.  The only thing that will work to challenge the obesity problem is to make it easy and safe for kids (and adults!) to play outside, and to make veggies and fruits more affordable than a bag of doritos. (yes, yes, I know that veggies are more nutrition for the money but people crave that salt and fat and it's very satiating for the money.)

I did notice lately that the giant sized drinks are ridiculous.  I ordered a medium beverage at a fast food place (Mc Donalds, I think?  Not sure.) and was shocked at the giant container they gave me.  I was expecting a 16oz glass with ice, but got a giant vat that didn't even fit into my cup holder.  Crazyness.  I don't allow my kids to drink that much pop, or juice, and I never will (until they are old enough to do it out of my sight, I guess! lol).  Drinking that much sugar all the time will not only make you fat but it will give you diabetes.

I think people need to get a handle on reasonable portion sizes, but legislation isn't the answer.

Same thing happened to me at Schlotzskys yesterday. I just didn't pay attention to the cup size and when I ordered a large, I got a gigantic cup that I could barely fit my hand around. Frankly that one cup of cherry coke lasted me my entire work day and then some.

And yes it was very tasty. I'm not ashamed that I drank it.

yourspecialkid
by Platinum Member on May. 31, 2012 at 8:57 AM
2 moms liked this

 So now people will just buy 2 and they will have more garbage.  I can see the logic in that....note the sarcasm.

sneffy014
by Bronze Member on May. 31, 2012 at 8:58 AM
2 moms liked this

I think it would be more productive to target the food industry itself and demand better quality food. If better quality food were served, the portions naturally would go back to being the correct amount because it would cost more to produce.. As a nation, we are eating substandard food because we perceive value with portion size. We think we are getting more for our money even though the foods are filled with artificial ingredients. 

lga1965
by on May. 31, 2012 at 9:01 AM

 That is silly. If some idiot is really stupid enough to choose to drink one of those BIG sodas/pops, then they deserve all the health issues that they bring on themselves. Banning anything is a waste of time.

Woodbabe
by Woodie on May. 31, 2012 at 9:02 AM

I'm disgusted that they're supporting diet drinks like this....that crap is just as bad, if not worse for you! Arent' any of them smart enough to read the studies showing artificial sweeteners actually contribute to obesity instead of helping it?

EllysMom1005
by Member on May. 31, 2012 at 9:03 AM


Quoting lga1965:

 That is silly. If some idiot is really stupid enough to choose to drink one of those BIG sodas/pops, then they deserve all the health issues that they bring on themselves. Banning anything is a waste of time.

Why is it stupid to choose a big drink every once in awhile? I usually drink a ton of water each day, but sometimes I want a big route 44 dr. pepper from Sonic. I don't have any health issues associated with drinking that much pop every once in awhile. Why can't moderation be the key?

Woodbabe
by Woodie on May. 31, 2012 at 9:06 AM
1 mom liked this


Quoting EllysMom1005:


Quoting lga1965:

 That is silly. If some idiot is really stupid enough to choose to drink one of those BIG sodas/pops, then they deserve all the health issues that they bring on themselves. Banning anything is a waste of time.

Why is it stupid to choose a big drink every once in awhile? I usually drink a ton of water each day, but sometimes I want a big route 44 dr. pepper from Sonic. I don't have any health issues associated with drinking that much pop every once in awhile. Why can't moderation be the key?

I just have to ask...when did a big route 44 sized drink get to be considered 'moderation'?

 Sexy If its unladylike, fattening or fun, I'm in!
  

EllysMom1005
by Member on May. 31, 2012 at 9:09 AM


Quoting Woodbabe:


Quoting EllysMom1005:

 

Quoting lga1965:

 That is silly. If some idiot is really stupid enough to choose to drink one of those BIG sodas/pops, then they deserve all the health issues that they bring on themselves. Banning anything is a waste of time.

Why is it stupid to choose a big drink every once in awhile? I usually drink a ton of water each day, but sometimes I want a big route 44 dr. pepper from Sonic. I don't have any health issues associated with drinking that much pop every once in awhile. Why can't moderation be the key?

I just have to ask...when did a big route 44 sized drink get to be considered 'moderation'?

I was referring to moderation of timeframes. Sorry if that wasn't clear. I don't do it frequently because soda is expensive, but every couple of months I'll grab a route 44. It will also last me all day.

Woodbabe
by Woodie on May. 31, 2012 at 9:14 AM


Quoting EllysMom1005:


Quoting Woodbabe:


Quoting EllysMom1005:


Quoting lga1965:

 That is silly. If some idiot is really stupid enough to choose to drink one of those BIG sodas/pops, then they deserve all the health issues that they bring on themselves. Banning anything is a waste of time.

Why is it stupid to choose a big drink every once in awhile? I usually drink a ton of water each day, but sometimes I want a big route 44 dr. pepper from Sonic. I don't have any health issues associated with drinking that much pop every once in awhile. Why can't moderation be the key?

I just have to ask...when did a big route 44 sized drink get to be considered 'moderation'?

I was referring to moderation of timeframes. Sorry if that wasn't clear. I don't do it frequently because soda is expensive, but every couple of months I'll grab a route 44. It will also last me all day.

Oh okay, thanks! :)

 Sexy If its unladylike, fattening or fun, I'm in!
  

EllysMom1005
by Member on May. 31, 2012 at 9:28 AM
1 mom liked this


Quoting Woodbabe:


Quoting EllysMom1005:

 

Quoting Woodbabe:


Quoting EllysMom1005:

 

Quoting lga1965:

 That is silly. If some idiot is really stupid enough to choose to drink one of those BIG sodas/pops, then they deserve all the health issues that they bring on themselves. Banning anything is a waste of time.

Why is it stupid to choose a big drink every once in awhile? I usually drink a ton of water each day, but sometimes I want a big route 44 dr. pepper from Sonic. I don't have any health issues associated with drinking that much pop every once in awhile. Why can't moderation be the key?

I just have to ask...when did a big route 44 sized drink get to be considered 'moderation'?

I was referring to moderation of timeframes. Sorry if that wasn't clear. I don't do it frequently because soda is expensive, but every couple of months I'll grab a route 44. It will also last me all day.

Oh okay, thanks! :)

No problem. :) I sometimes forget the general rule of expressing yourself clearly on the internet.

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