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Discrimination based on appearance

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I went into a high end toy store today to get DD a last birthday gift. I was way more casual than usual....yoga pants, a tank, and a velore jacket...and sandals. I had no make-up on and my hair was clean but not styled. I only had on an antique ring for jewelry. I COULD NOT GET ANY HELP! I wandered around looking for that "right gift" and employees looked right through me! I could not believe the difference from previous visits. I decided to leave and the owner gave me the once over like I was gonna shoplift. I left and went to another store and bought an obscenelly high priced doll and accessories.

The joke is...my casual clothes probably totaled $350 from head to toe and another $500 for sunglasses and purse. But I admit, I looked pretty darn ratty for this town.

DO YOU DISCRIMINATE ON HOW SOMEONE IS DRESSED? Or how they take care of themselves?
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
by on Jun. 6, 2012 at 10:38 PM
Replies (101-104):
yourspecialkid
by Platinum Member on Jun. 8, 2012 at 9:00 AM

 

Quoting Rooobeee:

 

Quoting futureshock:


Quoting yourspecialkid:

 

Quoting futureshock:


Quoting yourspecialkid:

 This happens more than we think.  I went shopping with my sister not long after she had her first baby.  She hadn't lost the weight yet but she was "over" the maternity clothes.  kwim  We were looking around the store and my sister had a couple of items over her arm...the clerk came up to me and asked if she could help me....I said no but she could help my sister...her reply with my sister standing with earshot..."oh we don't have clothes her size."  My poor sister was devastated..it was her favorite store.  She let the owner know she wouldn't be shopping there anymore.

I don't get it.  Do they have clothing in her size or not?  If not then what was wrong with the salesperson's comment?

 The largest size they carry is a 14...my sister was holding a couple of pairs of pants that she was hoping would fit.  What was wrong with her comment was the way it was delivered...predjucial and rude.  She was basically telling my sister SHE was too fat to shop there..it seemed I was okay though.

Is it prejudicial if it is true, though?

Regardless if it was true or not, the way the statement was delivered was prejudicial. The sales lady could have stated the truth a bit better. For example, she could have asked her sister what size she wore. And if her sister was looking for a size that was larger than a 14, then the proper response would have been, "I'm sorry, but we don't carry anything larger than a 14. Maybe you could try such-and-such place." This way, neither the PP or her sister would have felt offended and the store wouldn't have lost a customer.

 Thank you.

Not only that, but what if she had been shopping for someone else?  She could have easily been buying a gift for my Mom or her MIL...she could have been shopping for her own daughter..she didn't have a daughter..but she was old enough to.

Point being...her rudeness cost the store a very good customer.

Poppymary
by on Jul. 5, 2012 at 8:26 AM

its not an excuse but its human nature. Humans are very visual and often gravitate toward physically pleasing looking people. Its not fair and perfectly good people get left out. Which kinda leads to why the internet really works for some people since you can't judge anyone's appearance when its just text on a screen

and if looks are required online its easy enough to BS about that and give people wheat they wanna see to get that respect you want. Sad, but I bet people do it to get around the judging and disresepect.

Think about why actors and spokepersons are always attractive...no one wants to look at an ugly person talking and its funner to watch a pretty person talking and your more likely to listen to what they are saying. (example)


AdrianneHill
by Platinum Member on Jul. 7, 2012 at 3:04 AM
Yes, yes it would because you don't know who she is shopping for or why she is buying it. And if she just had a kid, she could wear a smaller size when her uterus went down in a week or so. The clerk didn't know because it was much easier to be rude and dismissive.
Assumptions don't bring in good money
Quoting futureshock:


Quoting yourspecialkid:

 


Quoting futureshock:




Quoting yourspecialkid:


 This happens more than we think.  I went shopping with my sister not long after she had her first baby.  She hadn't lost the weight yet but she was "over" the maternity clothes.  kwim  We were looking around the store and my sister had a couple of items over her arm...the clerk came up to me and asked if she could help me....I said no but she could help my sister...her reply with my sister standing with earshot..."oh we don't have clothes her size."  My poor sister was devastated..it was her favorite store.  She let the owner know she wouldn't be shopping there anymore.


I don't get it.  Do they have clothing in her size or not?  If not then what was wrong with the salesperson's comment?


 The largest size they carry is a 14...my sister was holding a couple of pairs of pants that she was hoping would fit.  What was wrong with her comment was the way it was delivered...predjucial and rude.  She was basically telling my sister SHE was too fat to shop there..it seemed I was okay though.

Is it prejudicial if it is true, though?

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
jshalas89
by Member on Jul. 7, 2012 at 3:09 AM
I think it would be more humble to say "my ratty clothes were actually cheap yet I still have money to buy expensive things."

No I don't judge based on appearance.
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