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Student loans: What's the big deal?

Posted by on Jun. 13, 2012 at 2:08 PM
  • 250 Replies

I feel as though I'm constantly hearing someone whine about student loans and now we have some cities offering repayment of loans for relocation (though, is this really new? Haven't certain areas alwasy offered this?) 

Recently a friend posted a cartoon on facebook:  A boy moving back home with "5 figure student loan debt" on his back.  His parents are giving him grief, stating that they started out with nothing.  His reply "I wish I could have started out with nothing!" 


What are your thoughts on the situation?  Should students come out of any 4 year University without any type of financial obligation?  Is a 4 year degree becoming the high school diploma?  


by on Jun. 13, 2012 at 2:08 PM
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Replies (1-10):
L1558
by Bronze Member on Jun. 13, 2012 at 2:14 PM
5 moms liked this

The price of college is completely over-the-top. The requirements to specialize in a degree involve all sorts of generic classes that you "must" attend in order to graduate with your degree in that specific area. Too few colleges are streamlined, affordable, or suitable for adults who want to further education or go back for a second career / degree.

The apathetic job market, combined with the high and rising cost of tuition, makes for a lose-lose situation.

When I was a high school grad (1997) my English teacher told me that he believed a 4 year degree was what a "high school diploma used to be" in terms of worth in the job market. He's probably right. If I had to go back, I'd probably have gone to community college instead and trade school and made myself get straight As and THEN apply for Master's scholarships.

I did well in school but only got partial scholarships. Even going to a state university and working 36 hrs/ wk WHILE attending full-time only did so much. I'm still paying off school loans and it's ridiculous.

I graduated with my Bachelors and a 3.92 GPA.

im23vaughn
by Silver Member on Jun. 13, 2012 at 2:16 PM
1 mom liked this
I think a 4 year degree is still important. I think too many get a b.s degree that's either over saturated or not in high demand. I pay about $300 a month to Sallie & don't see what the big deal is.

But we need to teach out kids to get a degree for a job that's in demand. Too many bus admin, bachelors of science, & liberal arts majors. We need more technology & science majors.
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Tanya93
by on Jun. 13, 2012 at 2:18 PM

Then get a certificate from a technical school if you don't have to actually have to take classes outside what you want to study.



Quoting L1558:

The price of college is completely over-the-top. The requirements to specialize in a degree involve all sorts of generic classes that you "must" attend in order to graduate with your degree in that specific area. Too few colleges are streamlined, affordable, or suitable for adults who want to further education or go back for a second career / degree.

The apathetic job market, combined with the high and rising cost of tuition, makes for a lose-lose situation.

When I was a high school grad (1997) my English teacher told me that he believed a 4 year degree was what a "high school diploma used to be" in terms of worth in the job market. He's probably right. If I had to go back, I'd probably have gone to community college instead and trade school and made myself get straight As and THEN apply for Master's scholarships.

I did well in school but only got partial scholarships. Even going to a state university and working 36 hrs/ wk WHILE attending full-time only did so much. I'm still paying off school loans and it's ridiculous.

I graduated with my Bachelors and a 3.92 GPA.


L1558
by Bronze Member on Jun. 13, 2012 at 2:19 PM
1 mom liked this

I wanted to study statistics and global economy. I do not know of a technical school that offers this degree...do you?

Edit: this "certificate"

Quoting Tanya93:

Then get a certificate from a technical school if you don't have to actually have to take classes outside what you want to study.



Quoting L1558:

The price of college is completely over-the-top. The requirements to specialize in a degree involve all sorts of generic classes that you "must" attend in order to graduate with your degree in that specific area. Too few colleges are streamlined, affordable, or suitable for adults who want to further education or go back for a second career / degree.

The apathetic job market, combined with the high and rising cost of tuition, makes for a lose-lose situation.

When I was a high school grad (1997) my English teacher told me that he believed a 4 year degree was what a "high school diploma used to be" in terms of worth in the job market. He's probably right. If I had to go back, I'd probably have gone to community college instead and trade school and made myself get straight As and THEN apply for Master's scholarships.

I did well in school but only got partial scholarships. Even going to a state university and working 36 hrs/ wk WHILE attending full-time only did so much. I'm still paying off school loans and it's ridiculous.

I graduated with my Bachelors and a 3.92 GPA.



Elkamelka
by Silver Member on Jun. 13, 2012 at 2:20 PM

My daughter did community college for a year and is now at a private university.  Her debt (in actuality my debt, since a Parent Plus loan has less interest) will be almost that of a 30-year house payment.  The good news?  If I die, the debt is forgiven.  

And agree with L1558...tuition is completely ridiculous.  However, this school is one of two who have her major.  And after it's all said and done, she will most likely have to move out of the country to find work, which is a whole other post! 

OHgirlinCA
by Platinum Member on Jun. 13, 2012 at 2:20 PM

 I will love it if my children come out of college without any financial obligations pertaining to student loans.  I think a degree is important depending on what you want a career in. 

Tanya93
by on Jun. 13, 2012 at 2:21 PM
1 mom liked this

Then you have to take the other classes.  College is about a well rounded education.  If you just wanted to study something specific, undergrad wasn't for you.

Quoting L1558:

I wanted to study statistics and global economy. I do not know of a technical school that offers this degree...do you?

Edit: this "certificate"

Quoting Tanya93:

Then get a certificate from a technical school if you don't have to actually have to take classes outside what you want to study.



Quoting L1558:

The price of college is completely over-the-top. The requirements to specialize in a degree involve all sorts of generic classes that you "must" attend in order to graduate with your degree in that specific area. Too few colleges are streamlined, affordable, or suitable for adults who want to further education or go back for a second career / degree.

The apathetic job market, combined with the high and rising cost of tuition, makes for a lose-lose situation.

When I was a high school grad (1997) my English teacher told me that he believed a 4 year degree was what a "high school diploma used to be" in terms of worth in the job market. He's probably right. If I had to go back, I'd probably have gone to community college instead and trade school and made myself get straight As and THEN apply for Master's scholarships.

I did well in school but only got partial scholarships. Even going to a state university and working 36 hrs/ wk WHILE attending full-time only did so much. I'm still paying off school loans and it's ridiculous.

I graduated with my Bachelors and a 3.92 GPA.




stephanie73401
by on Jun. 13, 2012 at 2:23 PM
3 moms liked this

Why do people think that they must have a loan to go to college? What happened to people working to pay for things with real money instead of credit and interest? I think teaching your children that debt is acceptable is the wrong path completely.

Tanya93
by on Jun. 13, 2012 at 2:24 PM
4 moms liked this

There is nothing wrong with getting loans for college.

The problem too many of them are now using them for a lifestyle in college instead of college classes.

Quoting stephanie73401:

Why do people think that they must have a loan to go to college? What happened to people working to pay for things with real money instead of credit and interest? I think teaching your children that debt is acceptable is the wrong path completely.


L1558
by Bronze Member on Jun. 13, 2012 at 2:26 PM

Sweetheart, I took the other classes (I have already obtained a Bachelor's). I know what a well-rounded education is, but I don't see how taking Italian 101 or Physics 102 is necessary for that type of study. If you just want to study something specific but it is not offered in a technical or trade school, then sometimes you MUST go through the non-essentials and PAY FOR THEM. This is why I mentioned dissatisfaction in my original, first post.

Did you obtain a 4 year degree? If so, did you ever take a class which was not of use to you at all in your professional or even personal future? 

Quoting Tanya93:

Then you have to take the other classes.  College is about a well rounded education.  If you just wanted to study something specific, undergrad wasn't for you.

Quoting L1558:

I wanted to study statistics and global economy. I do not know of a technical school that offers this degree...do you?

Edit: this "certificate"

Quoting Tanya93:

Then get a certificate from a technical school if you don't have to actually have to take classes outside what you want to study.



Quoting L1558:

The price of college is completely over-the-top. The requirements to specialize in a degree involve all sorts of generic classes that you "must" attend in order to graduate with your degree in that specific area. Too few colleges are streamlined, affordable, or suitable for adults who want to further education or go back for a second career / degree.

The apathetic job market, combined with the high and rising cost of tuition, makes for a lose-lose situation.

When I was a high school grad (1997) my English teacher told me that he believed a 4 year degree was what a "high school diploma used to be" in terms of worth in the job market. He's probably right. If I had to go back, I'd probably have gone to community college instead and trade school and made myself get straight As and THEN apply for Master's scholarships.

I did well in school but only got partial scholarships. Even going to a state university and working 36 hrs/ wk WHILE attending full-time only did so much. I'm still paying off school loans and it's ridiculous.

I graduated with my Bachelors and a 3.92 GPA.





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