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Ever hear of this saying? Basically taking money that is meant for one bill to cover a bill/groceries?

Irresponsible IYO and needing to learn to budget or a sign of the current economy for some?

What would you define as "living beyond your means?"

by on Aug. 3, 2012 at 10:30 AM
Replies (111-112):
LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Aug. 7, 2012 at 12:02 AM

I did that... .and I can do that.

Wait for it... :D

Quoting grandmab125:


Quoting LindaClement:

It is wasteful.

The volume of paper thrown out by the average school (and school child) in 1904 was 'none.' Because paper used to be expensive, and no one (who wasn't going to private school) could afford that kind of waste ... certainly not the taxpayers.

So, in addition to their total lack of wasted paper, there were all the other things that weren't wasted: pencils, pens, crayons, markers, binders, report covers...

Classrooms had a ruler, if a ruler was needed for this year's study. Because while it's fun to pretend that kids can only learn if they all have identical equipment at the same time, taking turns is a much older idea.

I actually don't think a graphic calculator is a fraction of the problem --when it comes to wastefulness. It's the 'list' of stuff that is duplicated at every single desk, in every single classroom (that makes 'back to school' the second-largest shopping season of the year). If you get a calculator (or, here's a weird idea: a free app for the smartphone three quarters of them are carrying around all day) in grade 9 when you first need it, and are expected to retain it through the duration of your math studies... that would be one thing.

It is systematic, built-in waste that no one thinks about anymore. Even the teachers who are buying it out of their own pockets have no impetus to think about it critically or create a way to do without... a skill that was once considered extremely valuable and that everyone should learn.

Quoting Lizardannie1966:

When you have 6 or 7 teachers for one child, each with their own requirements of what the child may need/should have and you shop for not one but two people to have different supplies, yes it can be costly and no, it's not wasteful.

The basic and obvious contribution that schools make in our children's lives going forward is that without a high school diploma or GED, our kids may not have successful careers. We want that for our children, I would assume-for each of them to be successful.

So if a teacher asks for graphing calculator (for example) for Algebra 1 class, you get it for your child so your child can have all the benefits possible of gaining that knowledge needed and to help them get that good grade in that class and earn that credit.

Generations ago, school supplies were different if not necessary at all. Today, they are necessary or at least the majority of them are.

And sometimes, they can cost the parents. It's worth it.

Quoting LindaClement:
 my point, which remains: school supplies are an extremely wasteful and unnecessary demand from the schools that contribute nothing at all to anyone's employability or education.
Quoting marchantmom06:

And I believe it was the OP of this post that said she HAD to spend over $200 on supplies for her home schooled child. So it's not a friend or made up buddy of mine. It's a woman in this post.


Some one mentioned that you did/do "unschooling".  What on earth is that?  Why don't you start a new post and explain it to us, especially those of us who are newer to CM?


Lizardannie1966
by on Aug. 7, 2012 at 1:29 AM


Quoting grandmab125:


Quoting Lizardannie1966:


Quoting grandmab125:


Quoting Lizardannie1966:

Perhaps for her, this was probably true. If I recall reading recently in this thread or another one, she also home-schooled but did what is called "unschooling," which is a different style of home-schooling from what I do.

Everything my daughter does is the same as every student here in our state that attends a tradition b&m school with one exception-our daughter does it here in the privacy of her home which for our daughter has been the key element of her schooling success, overall calm, pleasant attitude change from earlier years and good grades. Our daughter gets a high school diploma from the state of AZ in 2016. She has to take Arizona's required (in order to get that diploma) AIMS state testing and has to earn the same amount of credits. She has to take all of the same required courses as public school students here in our state and we have to follow the same attendance guidelines.

When you unschool, my understanding is that it is a different concept altogether.

When you're following a more traditional way of education, those supplies can be necessary.

Quoting marchantmom06:

She is saying that all supplies are superfluous.

That no one needs anything other than some old paper and a pencil.


Quoting Lizardannie1966:

When you have 6 or 7 teachers for one child, each with their own requirements of what the child may need/should have and you shop for not one but two people to have different supplies, yes it can be costly and no, it's not wasteful.

The basic and obvious contribution that schools make in our children's lives going forward is that without a high school diploma or GED, our kids may not have successful careers. We want that for our children, I would assume-for each of them to be successful.

So if a teacher asks for graphing calculator (for example) for Algebra 1 class, you get it for your child so your child can have all the benefits possible of gaining that knowledge needed and to help them get that good grade in that class and earn that credit.

Generations ago, school supplies were different if not necessary at all. Today, they are necessary or at least the majority of them are.

And sometimes, they can cost the parents. It's worth it.

Quoting LindaClement:
 my point, which remains: school supplies are an extremely wasteful and unnecessary demand from the schools that contribute nothing at all to anyone's employability or education.
Quoting marchantmom06:

And I believe it was the OP of this post that said she HAD to spend over $200 on supplies for her home schooled child. So it's not a friend or made up buddy of mine. It's a woman in this post.



What in the world is "unschooling"?  I wonder if Canada (where Linda is) has provincial (state) tests the kids must pass in order to earn a high school diploma, as most states here require.

In case you never noticed, in most of her posts, she takes every opportunity to point out how stupid, evil, selfish, whatever we Americans are....no matter what the topic is.  She seems to have a real hate on going on when it comes to America.  Maybe she's jealous of her sister who lives in the US, and perhaps has a better life than she does....just a thought.

I'm not sure exactly what "unschooling" is. I think it pertains to teaching a child from using things, places and experiences versus text books and computers.

But Linda would know best on this.

I've yet to see where she does attempt to make us Americans or our country in general feel inferior or dumb compared to her own. I have encountered others on CM who have made it point to make those jabs, too and this actually has included Americans.

I think calling Americans "selfish" the other night, rankled my nerves.  Any way, from a lot of her posts that I have read, she does have an air of superiority about her.  I'll have to find one of her posts, and ask her to explain to us all what "unschooling" is.


 

I wouldn't mind hearing more about unschooling, as well.

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