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Apparently, the Irish have chips on their shoulders, too

Posted by on Aug. 11, 2012 at 7:16 AM
  • 30 Replies

I was looking for news of how Pistorius did in his relay race at CBS.com (link) when I came upon this tasty nugget:  

"The Olympics are about phenomenal competition but they are also about inspiration. We will cheer for another Team USA blowout in basketball but there's nothing that can compare to when someone truly and remarkably makes a country go crazy with pride, such as when Ireland's Katie Taylor lifted up a country that had been through so much the past several years. For anyone with a chip on their shoulder or a physical hindrance to overcome, what Pisotrius* did -- against the best in the world -- should embolden them to do whatever they what because just about anything is possible nowadays." 

The part that got my attention was the phrase I've highlighted in red.  My kneejerk reaction was, "Watchoo talkin' 'bout, Willis?"  I eyed the statement suspiciously then I asked myself, "Could he be referring to that Katie person?  So I googled Katie to see what she did and I found the mother lode of Olympic reporting gold; an Irish reporter not all that happy with British, Australian and American reporting and stereotyping of the Irish!

Taylor success triggers bout of below-the-belt stereotyping

DONALD CLARKE

WE LEARNED a lot about what the world thought of us this week.


It all began rather gorgeously. Katie Taylor, greatest living Irishwoman, and Natasha Jonas, Liverpudlian cousin of Coleen Rooney, may have hammered nine colours of manure out of one another, but Monday’s bout was remarkable for the obvious warmth that existed between the two camps.

At the close, Taylor demonstrated her immaculate manners by hugging her opponent and shaking hands with Jonas’s corner people. The enthusiastic response from the BBC’s commentators suggested the British like us almost as much as we like ourselves.

The tone soured a little on Tuesday morning. Much has been made of an article in the Age, a Melbourne-based newspaper, that included the phrase: “For centuries, Guinness and whiskey have sent the Irish off their heads.” The piece also, rather confusingly, confirmed that – a compliment, one assumes – Taylor was not “surrounded by people who’d prefer a punch to a potato”. Following representations from the Irish Ambassador, the Age offered a convincingly effusive apology.

That article was, however, somewhat less offensive than a piece that appeared the same day in USA Today. Written by one Jon Saraceno, the report on Taylor’s first victory was a small masterpiece of vulgar stereotyping and galloping inaccuracy. “Back home on the emerald-green isle, pints of Guinness flowed freely, perhaps enough to replenish the Irish Sea. The ‘punters’ inside betting parlors wagered pounds as if they were bits of candy,” Saraceno raved from his seat in Paddy McHooligan’s Shamrock Tavern.

After misidentifying the Irish currency, the journalist went on to speak of “Bray county” and describe the Irish nation as “prideful” and “scuffling”. (I speculate here myself, but I am fairly sure he also mistook The Fields of Athenry for the national anthem.) USA Today initially acknowledged only the factual errors. But, in response to questions from this newspaper, eventually apologised for any offence given.

It’s a tricky one, this. It is probably safe to assume that both the Age and USA Today felt we would be flattered by their light-hearted caricatures. After all, many Australians (not all, not most, just many; I am trying hard to mind my own language) still seem happy to be depicted as carefree, well-lubricated larrikins.

Americans of Irish descent are responsible for a great deal of the standard tropes of Paddywhackery. Domestic critics have always had a slightly uneasy relationship with John Ford’s The Quiet Man. One can, without too much intellectual wriggling, argue that Ford’s version of Ireland is no more romanticised than his depiction of the American west. By giving Ford a free pass – and by singing along to boozier Pogues numbers – we do, however, invite the likes of Saraceno to deduce that we enjoy being caricatured as crafty, gambling dipsomaniacs.

One imagines the poor Australian writer and the unfortunate American scribbler looking sadly back at us with sorrowful eyes. “But we’re on your side!”

A day later, Telegraphgate broke. In its daily digest of Olympic highlights, the unofficial organ of the Conservative party asked: “Can anyone defeat Britain’s Katie Taylor?” Twitter quaked with volcanic fury. By lunchtime, the newspaper had issued its own apology and clarified that: “She is Irish, of course.”

Is it safe to assume that Daily Telegraph journalists know the Republic is a separate country and that the busy compiler was simply confused about Taylor’s nationality? Probably. But the next – and surely most outrageous – controversy did cause one to question such comforting suppositions.

Read the rest here:  http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/opinion/2012/0811/1224321996408.html

It's good to the last drop.

That Irish guy sure has a great, big,fat chip on his shoulder.  He wrote that he wanted to take care with his wording and then he blamed American Irish for the stereotypes.  That sounds like he stereotyped Americans of Irish ancestry.  

Any Irish in here want to comment?  I'll bet at least one wants to agree the Americans have contributed to the stereotype but why would American Irish perpetuate a stereotype?

*All misspellings in the articles are as I found them 


by on Aug. 11, 2012 at 7:16 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Debmomto2girls
by Platinum Member on Aug. 11, 2012 at 7:52 AM
2 moms liked this
I'm not Irish but my dh is. And it's true. I'm Italian and the same holds true. Italian Americans have pushed the stereotype that all Italians are mob related, gold chain wearing, pasta eating quidos. I lived in Italy at a very young age and many Italians from Italy don't get it
JonJon
by Ruby Member on Aug. 11, 2012 at 9:26 AM


Quoting Debmomto2girls:

I'm not Irish but my dh is. And it's true. I'm Italian and the same holds true. Italian Americans have pushed the stereotype that all Italians are mob related, gold chain wearing, pasta eating quidos. I lived in Italy at a very young age and many Italians from Italy don't get it

I'm smiling at the word guidos because out of curiosity I watched a marathon of Jersey Shore and it seemed to me the guys and gals really embraced the idea of being guidos when they wanted to be seen as cool and then rejecting the idea of being guidos and guidettes when they were worried they were overdoing it on the alcohol and getting rowdy.


MeAndTommyLee
by Gold Member on Aug. 11, 2012 at 10:36 AM

Thank you!  But you did forget the pinky ring!

Quoting Debmomto2girls:

I'm not Irish but my dh is. And it's true. I'm Italian and the same holds true. Italian Americans have pushed the stereotype that all Italians are mob related, gold chain wearing, pasta eating quidos. I lived in Italy at a very young age and many Italians from Italy don't get it


Debmomto2girls
by Platinum Member on Aug. 11, 2012 at 10:40 AM
Quoting JonJon:


Lol! And what is even funnier is that some of them aren't even all Italian! Shows like that really play into the stereotypes!

Debmomto2girls
by Platinum Member on Aug. 11, 2012 at 10:41 AM
1 mom liked this
Quoting MeAndTommyLee:


Lol.... How could I forget! Also, the velour track suits!

KelliansMom
by Bronze Member on Aug. 11, 2012 at 10:45 AM

Third gerneration Irish here , and I must say the Irish family i know are not what the irish americans seem to be, and as my great grandma used to put it it seems the less irish blood one has the more irish they seem or want to be. 

frogbender
by Captain Underpants on Aug. 11, 2012 at 10:45 AM
1 mom liked this

...and fish?

LucyMom08
by Gold Member on Aug. 11, 2012 at 10:55 AM
I'm Irish by heritage only so I can't really comment...

I just love the way the Irish writer uses his words...
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pagancuriosity
by Bronze Member on Aug. 11, 2012 at 11:09 AM

I'm also of Irish ancestory...and Proud Of It! I don't think Irish Americans are the only ones perpetuating the Irish stereotyping. I think a lot of people have ideas of how they think we are, and they try to make us fit into their perceptions. Even my husband does it sometimes. If I get mad and yell at him, it has to be because of my "irish temper," not because he's being a jackass.  I don't run around drinking, swearing, and brawling. Nor does any other Irish American that I personally know. The only thing I have that shows my Irish pride is a shamrock tattooed over my heart. Well, that and an Irish flag vanity plate on my car.

TugBoatMama
by on Aug. 11, 2012 at 11:13 AM
1 mom liked this

 I am of some Irish descent and we have a few of those old Irish stereotypes in my family history. A lot of drinking, cursing and fighting, etc. I have my grandfather's "Irish temper", or so I have been told. I keep it well hidden though. I can hold my liquor just fine but I am not a huge drinker. I have a beer here and there.

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