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Has anyone ever been a payee for social security?

Posted by on Aug. 23, 2012 at 9:27 AM
  • 17 Replies

My hubbys disability came through and I am very grateful though until I see the money I am still in a tough spot .  There is a catch though.  They have decided he needs a payee, and he isnt too happy.  He trusts me but as part of the payee system as we understand it we will need to account for where all the money goes and about that he is NOT happy.

He has some ideas about what he wants to do with it if they give us a large back award as is common.  He wants to pay for his funeral, and buy a bike I know for sure.

I read the booklet they gave me and I think that as long as we pay bills that he can spent excess as he chooses and as long as I write him a check and show he had control of the moneys in question it will be fine. 

Thoughts?


How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


by on Aug. 23, 2012 at 9:27 AM
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Replies (1-10):
yourspecialkid
by Platinum Member on Aug. 23, 2012 at 9:35 AM
1 mom liked this

 I am happy for you...and sad that your dh needs this to begin with.  I have conversed with you a little and while we don't agree on a number of things...I think your user name fits you perfectly...I have enormous respect for survivors.

I have never been a payee and recall us having a couple as part of living trusts when I was working with trusts.  I remember they had to submit a report once a year (yr..qtr?).  I am sorry I can't be more helpful...I mostly wanted to say^^ above.  Keep on hanging in there!

Lizardannie1966
by on Aug. 23, 2012 at 9:36 AM

I honestly had no idea about this payee thing. I've never gone further with SS than "No, you can't collect SSD because you don't have a ten-year stretch of employment," or "No, your spouse makes too much so you cannot collect SSI."

I'll be sure to check back with this thread. As for your husband finally being approved that is a very good thing and I am happy for you both. :)

katy_kay08
by on Aug. 23, 2012 at 9:42 AM

I've not been a Representative Payee but I know two individuals who have needed them. 

It doesn't sound like he can spend the excess as he chooses as there are certain conditions on those purchases and says that money left over at the end of the month must be put into savings.   Did you read this?  

http://www.ssa.gov/pubs/10076.html#a0=3

Sometimes benefits take a while to be approved. When this happens, back benefits may be paid all at once, in a large payment. First, you must spend the money on the beneficiary’s current needs such as rent and a security deposit, food or furnishings. After these expenses are paid, you may spend the money to improve the beneficiary’s daily living conditions or for better medical care. It is important that you spend the money wisely. You should keep in mind that the money must be used in the beneficiary’s best interests. If there is money still left over, it must be saved, preferably in U.S. Savings Bonds or an interest-paying bank account, insured under either federal or state law.

Improve Daily Living Conditions

After you have provided for the beneficiary’s basic needs, you may spend the money to improve the beneficiary’s daily living conditions or for better medical care. You may decide to use the beneficiary’s funds for major health-related expenses, if they are not covered by the beneficiary’s health insurance. Examples of these expenses are reconstructive dental care, a motorized wheelchair, rehabilitation expenses or insurance premiums.

You could use the money to arrange for the beneficiary to go to school or get special training.

You also could spend some of the money on the beneficiary’s recreational activities, such as movies, concerts or magazine subscriptions.

Special Purchases

You may want to make some of the following special purchases for the beneficiary.

  • A home—You can use funds as a down payment, and you can use some of the money to make payments on a house owned by the beneficiary.
  • Home improvements—You can pay for renovations that make the beneficiary’s home safer and more accessible; for example, installing a wheelchair ramp or widening doorways to accommodate a wheelchair.
  • Furniture—You can buy furniture for the beneficiary’s personal use, as well as items that may be shared with other members of the household, such as a television.


  • A car—You can use funds as a down payment, and you can use some of the money to make monthly car payments as long as the car is used for and owned by the beneficiary.

If you are not sure whether it is okay to use the money for a specific item, (for example, paying a bill the beneficiary owed before you became payee), contact your local Social Security office before you spend the money.

survivorinohio
by René on Aug. 23, 2012 at 9:44 AM

What fun would we have if we all agreed?  Thank you.

Quoting yourspecialkid:

 I am happy for you...and sad that your dh needs this to begin with.  I have conversed with you a little and while we don't agree on a number of things...I think your user name fits you perfectly...I have enormous respect for survivors.

I have never been a payee and recall us having a couple as part of living trusts when I was working with trusts.  I remember they had to submit a report once a year (yr..qtr?).  I am sorry I can't be more helpful...I mostly wanted to say^^ above.  Keep on hanging in there!


How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


survivorinohio
by René on Aug. 23, 2012 at 9:49 AM

Yes I read it.  It also states that recreational costs are fine, in the table the pamphlet provides the column for clothing, medical/dental/ personal items, recreation, and misc are all together.  Thats pretty broad.  I think the things he wants to do fit in there somewhere lol.  Thanks Katy.

Quoting katy_kay08:

I've not been a Representative Payee but I know two individuals who have needed them. 

It doesn't sound like he can spend the excess as he chooses as there are certain conditions on those purchases and says that money left over at the end of the month must be put into savings.   Did you read this?  

http://www.ssa.gov/pubs/10076.html#a0=3

Sometimes benefits take a while to be approved. When this happens, back benefits may be paid all at once, in a large payment. First, you must spend the money on the beneficiary’s current needs such as rent and a security deposit, food or furnishings. After these expenses are paid, you may spend the money to improve the beneficiary’s daily living conditions or for better medical care. It is important that you spend the money wisely. You should keep in mind that the money must be used in the beneficiary’s best interests. If there is money still left over, it must be saved, preferably in U.S. Savings Bonds or an interest-paying bank account, insured under either federal or state law.

Improve Daily Living Conditions

After you have provided for the beneficiary’s basic needs, you may spend the money to improve the beneficiary’s daily living conditions or for better medical care. You may decide to use the beneficiary’s funds for major health-related expenses, if they are not covered by the beneficiary’s health insurance. Examples of these expenses are reconstructive dental care, a motorized wheelchair, rehabilitation expenses or insurance premiums.

You could use the money to arrange for the beneficiary to go to school or get special training.

You also could spend some of the money on the beneficiary’s recreational activities, such as movies, concerts or magazine subscriptions.

Special Purchases

You may want to make some of the following special purchases for the beneficiary.

  • A home—You can use funds as a down payment, and you can use some of the money to make payments on a house owned by the beneficiary.
  • Home improvements—You can pay for renovations that make the beneficiary’s home safer and more accessible; for example, installing a wheelchair ramp or widening doorways to accommodate a wheelchair.
  • Furniture—You can buy furniture for the beneficiary’s personal use, as well as items that may be shared with other members of the household, such as a television.


  • A car—You can use funds as a down payment, and you can use some of the money to make monthly car payments as long as the car is used for and owned by the beneficiary.

If you are not sure whether it is okay to use the money for a specific item, (for example, paying a bill the beneficiary owed before you became payee), contact your local Social Security office before you spend the money.


How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


yourspecialkid
by Platinum Member on Aug. 23, 2012 at 9:50 AM

 

Quoting survivorinohio:

What fun would we have if we all agreed?  Thank you.

Quoting yourspecialkid:

 I am happy for you...and sad that your dh needs this to begin with.  I have conversed with you a little and while we don't agree on a number of things...I think your user name fits you perfectly...I have enormous respect for survivors.

I have never been a payee and recall us having a couple as part of living trusts when I was working with trusts.  I remember they had to submit a report once a year (yr..qtr?).  I am sorry I can't be more helpful...I mostly wanted to say^^ above.  Keep on hanging in there!


 LOL!  Absolutely none!

 

katy_kay08
by on Aug. 23, 2012 at 9:53 AM

I would contact your local office as I'm not sure a motorcycle counts as "recreational costs".  They go to the point of addressing a car so I do think it's something you need to get further approval before you buy it.  

Quoting survivorinohio:

Yes I read it.  It also states that recreational costs are fine, in the table the pamphlet provides the column for clothing, medical/dental/ personal items, recreation, and misc are all together.  Thats pretty broad.  I think the things he wants to do fit in there somewhere lol.  Thanks Katy.

Quoting katy_kay08:

I've not been a Representative Payee but I know two individuals who have needed them. 

It doesn't sound like he can spend the excess as he chooses as there are certain conditions on those purchases and says that money left over at the end of the month must be put into savings.   Did you read this?  

http://www.ssa.gov/pubs/10076.html#a0=3

Sometimes benefits take a while to be approved. When this happens, back benefits may be paid all at once, in a large payment. First, you must spend the money on the beneficiary’s current needs such as rent and a security deposit, food or furnishings. After these expenses are paid, you may spend the money to improve the beneficiary’s daily living conditions or for better medical care. It is important that you spend the money wisely. You should keep in mind that the money must be used in the beneficiary’s best interests. If there is money still left over, it must be saved, preferably in U.S. Savings Bonds or an interest-paying bank account, insured under either federal or state law.

Improve Daily Living Conditions

After you have provided for the beneficiary’s basic needs, you may spend the money to improve the beneficiary’s daily living conditions or for better medical care. You may decide to use the beneficiary’s funds for major health-related expenses, if they are not covered by the beneficiary’s health insurance. Examples of these expenses are reconstructive dental care, a motorized wheelchair, rehabilitation expenses or insurance premiums.

You could use the money to arrange for the beneficiary to go to school or get special training.

You also could spend some of the money on the beneficiary’s recreational activities, such as movies, concerts or magazine subscriptions.

Special Purchases

You may want to make some of the following special purchases for the beneficiary.

  • A home—You can use funds as a down payment, and you can use some of the money to make payments on a house owned by the beneficiary.
  • Home improvements—You can pay for renovations that make the beneficiary’s home safer and more accessible; for example, installing a wheelchair ramp or widening doorways to accommodate a wheelchair.
  • Furniture—You can buy furniture for the beneficiary’s personal use, as well as items that may be shared with other members of the household, such as a television.


  • A car—You can use funds as a down payment, and you can use some of the money to make monthly car payments as long as the car is used for and owned by the beneficiary.

If you are not sure whether it is okay to use the money for a specific item, (for example, paying a bill the beneficiary owed before you became payee), contact your local Social Security office before you spend the money.



EireLass
by Ruby Member on Aug. 23, 2012 at 9:54 AM

I am on SSDI. Nobody every mentions a "payee" as part of it. I did recieve my back pay, but nobody controlled what I had to do with it.

survivorinohio
by René on Aug. 23, 2012 at 9:59 AM

Ya know the more I read it it seems that the money can even be blown on concerts, the pamphlet specifically mentions concerts,  but you cant acquire items like the bike that could be considered resources.  He will get a newer van, his van is a rusty old 88) to be sure but maybe no bike:(  We could pay off the house though...  We have a lot of talking to do lol.

Quoting katy_kay08:

I've not been a Representative Payee but I know two individuals who have needed them. 

It doesn't sound like he can spend the excess as he chooses as there are certain conditions on those purchases and says that money left over at the end of the month must be put into savings.   Did you read this?  

http://www.ssa.gov/pubs/10076.html#a0=3

Sometimes benefits take a while to be approved. When this happens, back benefits may be paid all at once, in a large payment. First, you must spend the money on the beneficiary’s current needs such as rent and a security deposit, food or furnishings. After these expenses are paid, you may spend the money to improve the beneficiary’s daily living conditions or for better medical care. It is important that you spend the money wisely. You should keep in mind that the money must be used in the beneficiary’s best interests. If there is money still left over, it must be saved, preferably in U.S. Savings Bonds or an interest-paying bank account, insured under either federal or state law.

Improve Daily Living Conditions

After you have provided for the beneficiary’s basic needs, you may spend the money to improve the beneficiary’s daily living conditions or for better medical care. You may decide to use the beneficiary’s funds for major health-related expenses, if they are not covered by the beneficiary’s health insurance. Examples of these expenses are reconstructive dental care, a motorized wheelchair, rehabilitation expenses or insurance premiums.

You could use the money to arrange for the beneficiary to go to school or get special training.

You also could spend some of the money on the beneficiary’s recreational activities, such as movies, concerts or magazine subscriptions.

Special Purchases

You may want to make some of the following special purchases for the beneficiary.

  • A home—You can use funds as a down payment, and you can use some of the money to make payments on a house owned by the beneficiary.
  • Home improvements—You can pay for renovations that make the beneficiary’s home safer and more accessible; for example, installing a wheelchair ramp or widening doorways to accommodate a wheelchair.
  • Furniture—You can buy furniture for the beneficiary’s personal use, as well as items that may be shared with other members of the household, such as a television.


  • A car—You can use funds as a down payment, and you can use some of the money to make monthly car payments as long as the car is used for and owned by the beneficiary.

If you are not sure whether it is okay to use the money for a specific item, (for example, paying a bill the beneficiary owed before you became payee), contact your local Social Security office before you spend the money.


How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


survivorinohio
by René on Aug. 23, 2012 at 10:01 AM

A bike would count for recreation but if it were too valuable then it would be an issue.  Like if we restored his triumph it would be way too valuable for us to own:(

Quoting katy_kay08:

I would contact your local office as I'm not sure a motorcycle counts as "recreational costs".  They go to the point of addressing a car so I do think it's something you need to get further approval before you buy it.  

Quoting survivorinohio:

Yes I read it.  It also states that recreational costs are fine, in the table the pamphlet provides the column for clothing, medical/dental/ personal items, recreation, and misc are all together.  Thats pretty broad.  I think the things he wants to do fit in there somewhere lol.  Thanks Katy.

Quoting katy_kay08:

I've not been a Representative Payee but I know two individuals who have needed them. 

It doesn't sound like he can spend the excess as he chooses as there are certain conditions on those purchases and says that money left over at the end of the month must be put into savings.   Did you read this?  

http://www.ssa.gov/pubs/10076.html#a0=3

Sometimes benefits take a while to be approved. When this happens, back benefits may be paid all at once, in a large payment. First, you must spend the money on the beneficiary’s current needs such as rent and a security deposit, food or furnishings. After these expenses are paid, you may spend the money to improve the beneficiary’s daily living conditions or for better medical care. It is important that you spend the money wisely. You should keep in mind that the money must be used in the beneficiary’s best interests. If there is money still left over, it must be saved, preferably in U.S. Savings Bonds or an interest-paying bank account, insured under either federal or state law.

Improve Daily Living Conditions

After you have provided for the beneficiary’s basic needs, you may spend the money to improve the beneficiary’s daily living conditions or for better medical care. You may decide to use the beneficiary’s funds for major health-related expenses, if they are not covered by the beneficiary’s health insurance. Examples of these expenses are reconstructive dental care, a motorized wheelchair, rehabilitation expenses or insurance premiums.

You could use the money to arrange for the beneficiary to go to school or get special training.

You also could spend some of the money on the beneficiary’s recreational activities, such as movies, concerts or magazine subscriptions.

Special Purchases

You may want to make some of the following special purchases for the beneficiary.

  • A home—You can use funds as a down payment, and you can use some of the money to make payments on a house owned by the beneficiary.
  • Home improvements—You can pay for renovations that make the beneficiary’s home safer and more accessible; for example, installing a wheelchair ramp or widening doorways to accommodate a wheelchair.
  • Furniture—You can buy furniture for the beneficiary’s personal use, as well as items that may be shared with other members of the household, such as a television.


  • A car—You can use funds as a down payment, and you can use some of the money to make monthly car payments as long as the car is used for and owned by the beneficiary.

If you are not sure whether it is okay to use the money for a specific item, (for example, paying a bill the beneficiary owed before you became payee), contact your local Social Security office before you spend the money.




How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


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