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Twisted Sister tells Ryan/Romney to stop using their songs at rallies....

Posted by on Aug. 23, 2012 at 2:11 PM
  • 83 Replies
1 mom liked this
Dee Snider blasts Romney camp's use of Twisted Sister hit

Billboard

Are there any recording stars not named "Kid" or "Jr." who are willing to let the Mitt Romney campaign use (or like) their music? A week after Silversun Pickups issued a cease and desist order to the GOP candidate for playing one of their songs at events, Twisted Sister's Dee Snider has now spoken out with a similar objection.

After getting word that Romney's running mate, Rep. Paul Ryan, used the band's biggest hit at a recent rally in Pennsylvania, Snider issued a statement to website Talking Points Memo.

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"I emphatically denounce Paul Ryan's use of my band Twisted Sister's song, 'We're Not Gonna Take It,' in any capacity," Snider said through his manager. "There is almost nothing he stands for that I agree with except the use of the [workout program] P90X."

"We're Not Gonna Take It" spent 15 weeks on the Hot 100 in the summer of 1984, topping out at No. 2, making it the band's biggest hit.

Other artists that have blasted the campaign include Somali-Canadian artist K'naan and Silversun Pickups, who objected to the campaign's use of their song "Panic Switch." Guitarist Tom Morello penned an Op-Ed last week after hearing Ryan was a fan of his band, Rage Against the Machine.

More: Devo to release song about Mitt Romney's dog

"He is the embodiment of the machine that our music has been raging against for two decades," Morello wrote for Rolling Stone. "Ryan claims that he likes Rage's sound, but not the lyrics. Well, I don't care for Paul Ryan's sound or his lyrics."

Romney does have friends in country veteran Lee Greenwood, who has sung his anthem "God Bless the U.S.A." at events; Kid Rock, an early supporter whose song "Born Free" is used at rallies; Hank Williams Jr., a particularly vocal opponent of Barack Obama; and KISS bassist Gene Simmons.

This current musical controversy is the latest case of politicians butting heads with unhappy artists over their campaign soundtracks -- during the 2008 presidential campaign alone, the Foo Fighters, Jackson Browne and John Mellencamp asked Republican candidate John McCain to quit using their songs.


by on Aug. 23, 2012 at 2:11 PM
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Replies (1-10):
radioheid
by Libertarian on Aug. 23, 2012 at 2:12 PM
3 moms liked this

 They might want to get used to it. No one who is or ever has been cool is going to allow Romney/Ryan to use their songs. LOL

By the way, I love your signature.


"Roger that. Over."

R   A   D    I    O    H    E    I    D

Donna6503
by Platinum Member on Aug. 23, 2012 at 2:14 PM
6 moms liked this
Maybe the Osmond will allow the uses of "Puppy Love" based on how Romney and Ryan looks at each other.

Seems to me the only music group out there that supports em
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Billiebeth
by on Aug. 23, 2012 at 2:15 PM
1 mom liked this

Maybe they should remove their songs from the database and forgo the royalties.

GoddessNDaRuff
by Silver Member on Aug. 23, 2012 at 2:23 PM
2 moms liked this

Why would they do that? They don't want their music connected to politics they disagree with and reserve the right to say so.

Quoting Billiebeth:

Maybe they should remove their songs from the database and forgo the royalties.


Billiebeth
by on Aug. 23, 2012 at 2:24 PM

They can say all the want.  These people have paid for the use of their music.

Quoting GoddessNDaRuff:

Why would they do that? They don't want their music connected to politics they disagree with and reserve the right to say so.

Quoting Billiebeth:

Maybe they should remove their songs from the database and forgo the royalties.



GoddessNDaRuff
by Silver Member on Aug. 23, 2012 at 2:29 PM
3 moms liked this

Did they pay for private use or for public use? There is a difference. Blasting their music at a politically rally would be in violation of private use. And even if they keep using their music at least their fans know they are against them using their music. They can possibly sue for how their music is being used actually. It's smarter for them to just stop playing their music at their rallies and stick to playing it in their cars and offices.

Quoting Billiebeth:

They can say all the want.  These people have paid for the use of their music.

Quoting GoddessNDaRuff:

Why would they do that? They don't want their music connected to politics they disagree with and reserve the right to say so.

Quoting Billiebeth:

Maybe they should remove their songs from the database and forgo the royalties.




cjsbmom
by Lois Lane on Aug. 23, 2012 at 2:29 PM
5 moms liked this

That's not how it works. It's different if you're using the music to promote a product. In this case, they are using it to promote themselves. The band has every right to tell them they can't use the music under those circumstances.

Quoting Billiebeth:

They can say all the want.  These people have paid for the use of their music.

Quoting GoddessNDaRuff:

Why would they do that? They don't want their music connected to politics they disagree with and reserve the right to say so.

Quoting Billiebeth:

Maybe they should remove their songs from the database and forgo the royalties.





Billiebeth
by on Aug. 23, 2012 at 2:30 PM

Political campaigns pay for a blanket license.   If they were only playing it at events, yes they do have the right to use it.

Quoting cjsbmom:

That's not how it works. It's different if you're using the music to promote a product. In this case, they are using it to promote themselves. The band has every right to tell them they can't use the music under those circumstances.

Quoting Billiebeth:

They can say all the want.  These people have paid for the use of their music.

Quoting GoddessNDaRuff:

Why would they do that? They don't want their music connected to politics they disagree with and reserve the right to say so.

Quoting Billiebeth:

Maybe they should remove their songs from the database and forgo the royalties.





Billiebeth
by on Aug. 23, 2012 at 2:31 PM

All the major campaigns have paid for a blanket license.   That means they can use whatever song is in the database at their rallies and speeches.

Quoting GoddessNDaRuff:

Did they pay for private use or for public use? There is a difference. Blasting their music at a politically rally would be in violation of private use. And even if they keep using their music at least their fans know they are against them using their music. They can possibly sue for how their music is being used actually. It's smarter for them to just stop playing their music at their rallies and stick to playing it in their cars and offices.

Quoting Billiebeth:

They can say all the want.  These people have paid for the use of their music.

Quoting GoddessNDaRuff:

Why would they do that? They don't want their music connected to politics they disagree with and reserve the right to say so.

Quoting Billiebeth:

Maybe they should remove their songs from the database and forgo the royalties.





GoddessNDaRuff
by Silver Member on Aug. 23, 2012 at 2:33 PM
3 moms liked this

What database?

And still since they've spoken out against the use of their music by these people their fans still know they are against them politically and they look stupid for continuing to use their music.

Quoting Billiebeth:

All the major campaigns have paid for a blanket license.   That means they can use whatever song is in the database at their rallies and speeches.

Quoting GoddessNDaRuff:

Did they pay for private use or for public use? There is a difference. Blasting their music at a politically rally would be in violation of private use. And even if they keep using their music at least their fans know they are against them using their music. They can possibly sue for how their music is being used actually. It's smarter for them to just stop playing their music at their rallies and stick to playing it in their cars and offices.

Quoting Billiebeth:

They can say all the want.  These people have paid for the use of their music.

Quoting GoddessNDaRuff:

Why would they do that? They don't want their music connected to politics they disagree with and reserve the right to say so.

Quoting Billiebeth:

Maybe they should remove their songs from the database and forgo the royalties.






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