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 ...education is tax-funded from kindergarten through college. Students undergo a series of aptitude and personality tests between 4th and 8th grades which find the areas in which they are most interested, adept and physically and mentally suited. Their courses from grade 9 onward are tailored for a personalized education plan, which places them on either a vocational or college career track. People are now in education programs in which they are both interested and prepared. Drop-out rates plunge, graduates are prepared and enthusiastic, and major student loan debt is a thing of the past.

Sound good? It *is* possible, and it would boost our economy, lower the number dependant upon social welfare programs, and potentially reduce the crime rate.

The cost, of course, would be huge, and would require completely reworking how tax dollars are appropriated. We'd have to cut quite a bit of foreign aid and defense spending, but in the long term, such a program would be sustainable, and the benefit would be worth trading in for the hundreds of billions we spend on other countries and our apparently paranoid fear of them.

What do you think?

And for the record, the word "socialist" doesn't evoke feelings of panic and fear in me. lol


"Roger that. Over."

R   A   D    I    O    H    E    I    D

by on Sep. 24, 2012 at 10:14 AM
Replies (21-30):
EireLass
by Ruby Member on Sep. 24, 2012 at 11:01 AM

I think if parents are in-tune with the child, they're following their education, they know their childs skills. The parent can then help the child focus in that direction. I think in general people say 'college after high school', but really, it should be 'learned skills after high school'. A plumber doesn't need college, but he still needs his years of trade school. And the problem with 'not being ready' after school....there is so much more that the text book doesn't teach. Aren't the parents teaching that to their kids? Aren't the parents telling their kids they need to take networking classes? (Not internet network). Kids need to be taught people skills. They need to learn what it means to weave through life. They need to be taught, that although they enter college with one focus....don't be afraid to switch gears and go in another direction. And don't think that 2 years or 4 years, is the end of your education. Plan on learning forever. I think the fault lies with parents, not the schools.

Quoting radioheid:

 This wouldn't be a "locked-in" program. There are people suited to be scholars, and people suited to be craftsmen. The classes people take in high school should reflect that, rather than forcing everyone to take progressively difficult maths and sciences that benefit no one in the long run. We're telling everyone they *have to* go to college, and the problem is that not everyone should, nor does everyone benefit from it. How many college students rack up 20, 30, 40 grand or more student loan debt? How many of those who rack up loan debt never graduate college, or graduate and cannot find a job? How many employers complain that their new hires are unprepared? The current system is broken.

Quoting CDMelty:

I don't think I like the idea of being tied in to what you want to be when you grow up from age 14 on. How many people change their majors in college, and this is tailoring education to a career from 9th grade on?

Mrs.Kubalabuku
by Bronze Member on Sep. 24, 2012 at 11:03 AM

Doesn't Japan already do something like this?  And don't they have mass suicides after those aptitude tests?

Of course, they are a rather productive country...

*Forgive me, I haven't had my coffee.  I plan to come back after I wake up more and research, but that Japan thing was first thought to come in coherently.*

GLWerth
by Gina on Sep. 24, 2012 at 11:20 AM

This could be a great way to move forward.

Unfortunately, it might be hard to do, given that many parents would object, strenuously, if little Jimmy or Sally were tracked in a direction that didn't go along with their vision.

For example, some kids will not thrive in college. They are simply not of an academic bent, but many of those same kids have the potential for incredible technical skill.

Along with this, it is a shame that some occupations that are not really viable for long term employment due to lack of benefits, low pay, etc.

Grainia
by Member on Sep. 24, 2012 at 11:36 AM


Quoting Billiebeth:

I simply don't want the government determining what my children are taught.

I wish my school had done something like this so I wouldn't have wasted my life on shit that made my parents happy.

radioheid
by Libertarian on Sep. 24, 2012 at 11:38 AM
1 mom liked this

 Not sure about all that. Japan has one of the highest life expectancies on earth, so I don't think their suicide rate is *that* high.

Quoting Mrs.Kubalabuku:

Doesn't Japan already do something like this?  And don't they have mass suicides after those aptitude tests?

Of course, they are a rather productive country...

*Forgive me, I haven't had my coffee.  I plan to come back after I wake up more and research, but that Japan thing was first thought to come in coherently.*

 


"Roger that. Over."

R   A   D    I    O    H    E    I    D

Lizardannie1966
by on Sep. 24, 2012 at 11:39 AM

The problem I have with this I've highlighted in red.

In 9th grade, my oldest daughter wanted to be a marine biologist. Problem is, we live in Arizona and in order for her to pursue her career, she would have had to leave the state she was born and raised in. At that young age, the idea of leaving home didn't appeal to her.

In senior year, she wanted to be a Rockette and dance to her heart's content.

At 25, she's a college grad, and has been pursuing her career field as a vet technician for about 6 or more years.

Our son, age 19, wanted to be a pro skater in the early years of high school. When he graduated from high school, he wanted to do video game design..............or forensics.

He is 6 weeks away from graduating as an HVAC/Refrigeration specialist and currently works full-time at the same animal hospital that his older sister does.

The third and final child is in grade 9 and since last summer, has still been trying to decide what she wishes to be when she grows up. It started with police officer, then doctor and now it's a teacher again.

So my point is this, that "personalized education plan" can change is the child grows and their desires also change. IOW, they're often indecisive and unsure at such young ages.

However, I LOVE the idea of drop-out rates declining and of students getting more one-on-one, individualized education (or more so).

Quoting radioheid:

 Students undergo a series of aptitude and personality tests between 4th and 8th grades which find the areas in which they are most interested, adept and physically and mentally suited. Their courses from grade 9 onward are tailored for a personalized education plan, which places them on either a vocational or college career track. People are now in education programs in which they are both interested and prepared.

radioheid
by Libertarian on Sep. 24, 2012 at 11:43 AM

 For the naysayers: The US Armed Forces already do this, to an extent. You take a big test known as the ASVAB, the scores come in, and you choose your career field, based on your interests and your test scores. Your education and vocational training are paid for 100%, and you're even given a bonus if you enter an extremely difficult or high-demand field.

If you're completely dissatisfied, you can apply for cross-training after a certain number of months.

; )


"Roger that. Over."

R   A   D    I    O    H    E    I    D

lga1965
by on Sep. 24, 2012 at 11:46 AM
That pretty much describes my school. We had college prep pr vocational programs and testing and counseling in order to plan. About 98% graduated. But that.was in the 1950's ......however it seems to be true in the present day. Parents made sure of it.
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D.O.E.
by on Sep. 24, 2012 at 12:03 PM
1 mom liked this

i nominate you as minister of education.

can i get a "hear, hear" ? 

lol

LuvmyAiden
by on Sep. 24, 2012 at 12:49 PM

Though it is a great concept I am not for govt. funded school. It gives them the ability to indoctrinate our kids with their agenda. I think we would be better off with more private schools and maybe govt. stipends for funding. I don't have any perfect ideas but govt. run education is NOT working and really isn't beneficial.

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