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What's Next on the School Force Food Agenda? School District Bans Ice Cream


School District Bans PTA Ice Cream Sales

School District Bans PTA Ice Cream Sales

Oct 5, 2012

By Todd Starnes

A New Jersey school district has ordered the PTA to stop selling ice cream to students on campus because the longtime fundraising violates state and federal law.

For years the PTA in Parsippany, New Jersey sold ice cream once a week on campuses across the district. The money was used to fund cultural arts programs and field trips for the students.

But earlier this week, the district superintendent sent a letter to the group informing the parents that those tiny cups of ice cream could no longer be sold on campus.

“We don’t know the full extent of the issue, but the PTA cannot sell ice cream during our lunch time hour,” PTA president Liz Kadian told Fox News. “It’s disturbing to many parents.”

Supt. LeRoy Seitz told Fox News that the district has no choice in the matter.

“While we fully understand that our students enjoyed the PTA ice cream fundraisers in the past and that the ice cream sale fundraiser was very successful for our PTAs, we cannot approve activities, including PTA ice cream sales that are in violation of state regulations,” he said in a statement.

The law forbids any food sale fundraising efforts during the “hours when our school nutritional program is in operation.”

“It is unfortunate that we cannot permit the PTA ice cream sales during the hours that lunch is being served and again, we have asked our principales to work with his or her PTA to find other opportunities to fundraise that are in compliance with state regulations,” he said.

“I think it’s ridiculous and a majority of the parents feel the same way,” Kadian told Fox News. “It’s a once-a-week treat.”

Dozens of parents are voicing their extreme displeasure about the new ice cream ban on the Parsippany Patch website.

“I can only imagine what will be next,” one parent wrote. “Will the school board start checking lunch boxes making sure that parents did not pack too many Twinkies or yodels?”

“Whether it is federal, state or local government-mandated, another piece of childhood innocence is being taken away,” another parent wrote. “How sad that an elementary school child can’t look forward to buying something as simple as an ice cream bar once a week.”

Last week more than 1,000 students at Parsippany Hills High School staged a strike against the cafeteria to protest federal guidelines governing portion size. As a result, a number of parents are now packing lunches for their children.

Kadian said she understands the USDA’s concerns over healthy lunches – but she noted that the ice cream they sold met state guidelines. The ice cream cups contained about four bites of – and the ice pops were sugar-free.

Teachers also used the weekly ice cream sale as an incentive – offering students the chance to earn certificates for a free treat.

But Kadian said the bigger issue is fundraising. Without the ice cream sales, many student activities could be jeopardized.

She said the PTA will be meeting soon to discuss their options.

http://radio.foxnews.com/toddstarnes/top-stories/school-district-bans-ice-cream.html

....I am only responsible for what I say,NOT for what you understand.....
by on Oct. 6, 2012 at 1:22 PM
Replies (41-50):
tessaloveof3
by Member on Oct. 6, 2012 at 4:38 PM
3 moms liked this

Your post has nothing to do with banning an ice cream sale once a week.   I don't even say that ice cream, in a reasonable portion, daily is a bad thing.   It doesn't have to be one.

And please do not lecture me on nutrition. 

Offering ice cream once a week does not hurt the children.  A lack of daily recess and PE is a much bigger issue.

Quoting Sisteract:

Kids who are boycotting dietary appropriate proportions do not have a healthy relationship with food.

Parents who applaud KK donuts and candy because the kids love it, might need some education in terms of appropriate dietary choices.

These kids can still eat the crappy, processed American diet at home- the schools should not be part of it though.

Get it?

Not school sanctioned- education- that is what the school is for.

Not a dispensary for Twinkies, donuts, ice cream, condoms, cigarettes or soda.

Quoting tessaloveof3:

Forbidding foods doesn't teach children that all things are acceptable in moderation.   Banning ice cream once a week doesn't teach children a healthy relationship with foods like that.   I am not sure I can make it any clearer for you.  Banning foods does not teach children how to live a healthy life.

Quoting Raintree:

Say what?

Quoting tessaloveof3:

Children do not develop a healthy relationship with food if they are told certain foods are forbidden from being sold at school.  Everything is fine in moderation and anyone that doesn't think that knows very little about nutrition and healthy eating habits and responsibility when it comes to food choices.

Quoting Sisteract:

I agree.

The sooner people learn that food is for fuel and not a reward, event, punishment, activity and highlight of the day, the better.

KIDS should be encouraged to develop a healthy relationship with food from the get go.

MOST Americans are deficient in this area.

It affects health and hc costs-

I would think that fiscal conservies would get it- it's $$$$$.

Quoting Bookwormy:

I really hope this is a private schoo that receives no public funding for meals! That is disgusting!


Quoting Godgaveme4:

 Our ASB just sold boxes of krispy Kremes at lunch last week.  The kids loved it.  Next week the sophmores are selling candy.  All of it is for fundtraising.


And in the elementary the kids can choose ice cream as a side item.


I love my school!








Bookwormy
by Platinum Member on Oct. 6, 2012 at 4:39 PM
I think most any food is healthy in moderation & therefore treats should be moderated at home & not be served or sold at school. It is parents' responsibility to teach this relationship w/food, not the school. Anyone who doesn't think this knows very little about parenting as well as nutrition & developing healthy eating habits in children that will last a lifetime. Perhaps this is why we have an *adult* obesity epidemic in this country, myself included. I'm taking personal responsibility for this, however, & will not be obese forever.


Quoting tessaloveof3:

Children do not develop a healthy relationship with food if they are told certain foods are forbidden from being sold at school.  Everything is fine in moderation and anyone that doesn't think that knows very little about nutrition and healthy eating habits and responsibility when it comes to food choices.


Quoting Sisteract:

I agree.

The sooner people learn that food is for fuel and not a reward, event, punishment, activity and highlight of the day, the better.

KIDS should be encouraged to develop a healthy relationship with food from the get go.

MOST Americans are deficient in this area.

It affects health and hc costs-

I would think that fiscal conservies would get it- it's $$$$$.

Quoting Bookwormy:

I really hope this is a private schoo that receives no public funding for meals! That is disgusting!





Quoting Godgaveme4:

 Our ASB just sold boxes of krispy Kremes at lunch last week.  The kids loved it.  Next week the sophmores are selling candy.  All of it is for fundtraising.



And in the elementary the kids can choose ice cream as a side item.



I love my school!






Posted on CafeMom Mobile
mhaney03
by on Oct. 6, 2012 at 4:40 PM

I agree..

My kids are surrounded by junk food at their grandma's house every day but because *I* as their FIRST teacher and parent, have taught them better, they don't touch the stuff without making sure what they ate before is appropriate AND they know better than to grab it without asking permission first.  They are 9 and 6, it isn't THAT hard to teach them.  Parents who don't understand this -- I have no words.

Quoting conweis:

Is the government going to reimburse them for the money they will lose?
How can you teach proper nutrition if there are not choices? Teach moderation, portion control and how to balance a meal.


LauraKW
by "Dude!" on Oct. 6, 2012 at 4:41 PM

 That is the job of the parents, not the school.

Quoting conweis:

Is the government going to reimburse them for the money they will lose?
How can you teach proper nutrition if there are not choices? Teach moderation, portion control and how to balance a meal.

 

tessaloveof3
by Member on Oct. 6, 2012 at 4:41 PM

Please do not even pretend to tell me that I have no clue on nutrition or raising children.

Quoting Bookwormy:

I think most any food is healthy in moderation & therefore treats should be moderated at home & not be served or sold at school. It is parents' responsibility to teach this relationship w/food, not the school. Anyone who doesn't think this knows very little about parenting as well as nutrition & developing healthy eating habits in children that will last a lifetime. Perhaps this is why we have an *adult* obesity epidemic in this country, myself included. I'm taking personal responsibility for this, however, & will not be obese forever.


Quoting tessaloveof3:

Children do not develop a healthy relationship with food if they are told certain foods are forbidden from being sold at school.  Everything is fine in moderation and anyone that doesn't think that knows very little about nutrition and healthy eating habits and responsibility when it comes to food choices.


Quoting Sisteract:

I agree.

The sooner people learn that food is for fuel and not a reward, event, punishment, activity and highlight of the day, the better.

KIDS should be encouraged to develop a healthy relationship with food from the get go.

MOST Americans are deficient in this area.

It affects health and hc costs-

I would think that fiscal conservies would get it- it's $$$$$.

Quoting Bookwormy:

I really hope this is a private schoo that receives no public funding for meals! That is disgusting!





Quoting Godgaveme4:

 Our ASB just sold boxes of krispy Kremes at lunch last week.  The kids loved it.  Next week the sophmores are selling candy.  All of it is for fundtraising.



And in the elementary the kids can choose ice cream as a side item.



I love my school!







Healthystart30
by Silver Member on Oct. 6, 2012 at 4:42 PM
Hmm my daughters school has a fruit smoothie fundraiser once a week after school. It has been pretty successful as far as I can tell, so why not do that or just sell the ice-cream after school?
Raintree
by Ruby Member on Oct. 6, 2012 at 4:45 PM

You said that children do not develop a healthy relationship with food if they are told certain foods are forbidden from being sold in school.

Emphasis on 'in school'.

I wasn't aware that by homeschooling my children I am endangering their relationship to food. I also wasn't aware that private schools like yeshivas are actively destroying children's relationship to food. My own alma matar was entirely lacto/ovo vegetarian in their cafeteria and policy. I don't recall anyone having a 'bad' or unhealthy relationship with food. My husband's family was very strict with their approach to what was offered at the table. If you didn't like it- tough. My husband's family eats largely how they were raised, and not a one of them has any food related issues- health or otherwise.

To place the burden on relationship with food on the supposition that a child must never hear that junk food isn't allowed on a school campus is bizarre, at best. Yes, moderation is good. You just don't see a lot of moderation in the approach to fundraisers that use food.

Quoting tessaloveof3:

Forbidding foods doesn't teach children that all things are acceptable in moderation.   Banning ice cream once a week doesn't teach children a healthy relationship with foods like that.   I am not sure I can make it any clearer for you.  Banning foods does not teach children how to live a healthy life.

Quoting Raintree:

Say what?

Quoting tessaloveof3:

Children do not develop a healthy relationship with food if they are told certain foods are forbidden from being sold at school.  Everything is fine in moderation and anyone that doesn't think that knows very little about nutrition and healthy eating habits and responsibility when it comes to food choices.

Quoting Sisteract:

I agree.

The sooner people learn that food is for fuel and not a reward, event, punishment, activity and highlight of the day, the better.

KIDS should be encouraged to develop a healthy relationship with food from the get go.

MOST Americans are deficient in this area.

It affects health and hc costs-

I would think that fiscal conservies would get it- it's $$$$$.

Quoting Bookwormy:

I really hope this is a private schoo that receives no public funding for meals! That is disgusting!


Quoting Godgaveme4:

 Our ASB just sold boxes of krispy Kremes at lunch last week.  The kids loved it.  Next week the sophmores are selling candy.  All of it is for fundtraising.


And in the elementary the kids can choose ice cream as a side item.


I love my school!







Sisteract
by Whoopie on Oct. 6, 2012 at 4:47 PM

Bingo.

I am olde,r 50+ and I know what has to been done in order to maintain a healthy body and mind. It is a very difficult daily task. The sooner people learn and accept that your taste buds are not Disneyland, the better.

Most do not accept it until there are huge health problems or limitations.

People condition themselves and use food as a reward.

Everyone knows the buzz words, few live by them.

Quoting Bookwormy:

I think most any food is healthy in moderation & therefore treats should be moderated at home & not be served or sold at school. It is parents' responsibility to teach this relationship w/food, not the school. Anyone who doesn't think this knows very little about parenting as well as nutrition & developing healthy eating habits in children that will last a lifetime. Perhaps this is why we have an *adult* obesity epidemic in this country, myself included. I'm taking personal responsibility for this, however, & will not be obese forever.


Quoting tessaloveof3:

Children do not develop a healthy relationship with food if they are told certain foods are forbidden from being sold at school.  Everything is fine in moderation and anyone that doesn't think that knows very little about nutrition and healthy eating habits and responsibility when it comes to food choices.


Quoting Sisteract:

I agree.

The sooner people learn that food is for fuel and not a reward, event, punishment, activity and highlight of the day, the better.

KIDS should be encouraged to develop a healthy relationship with food from the get go.

MOST Americans are deficient in this area.

It affects health and hc costs-

I would think that fiscal conservies would get it- it's $$$$$.

Quoting Bookwormy:

I really hope this is a private schoo that receives no public funding for meals! That is disgusting!





Quoting Godgaveme4:

 Our ASB just sold boxes of krispy Kremes at lunch last week.  The kids loved it.  Next week the sophmores are selling candy.  All of it is for fundtraising.



And in the elementary the kids can choose ice cream as a side item.



I love my school!







Separation of church and state is for the protection of BOTH church and state.
Leading with hate and intolerance only leads to MORE hate and intolerance.
slashteddy
by Bronze Member on Oct. 6, 2012 at 4:47 PM

I'm sorry but this just made me roll my eyes. The first line of the article makes it sound like the law's been in effect for a while but they just now got around to enforcing it. Besides that, the state I live in has had similar laws for years - no sales of any kind of junk food whatsoever was permitted during school hours. No cookie dough sales, no candy bar fundraisers, nothing. No vending machines (candy or soda) on campus either.

Godgaveme4
by Platinum Member on Oct. 6, 2012 at 4:50 PM

 Sounds pretty clear to me.  And it is what our school does.  And it is a pproved by the parents who serve on the committee (Drs, nurses, SAHMs and nutritionists)

Quoting tessaloveof3:

Forbidding foods doesn't teach children that all things are acceptable in moderation.   Banning ice cream once a week doesn't teach children a healthy relationship with foods like that.   I am not sure I can make it any clearer for you.  Banning foods does not teach children how to live a healthy life.

Quoting Raintree:

Say what?

Quoting tessaloveof3:

Children do not develop a healthy relationship with food if they are told certain foods are forbidden from being sold at school.  Everything is fine in moderation and anyone that doesn't think that knows very little about nutrition and healthy eating habits and responsibility when it comes to food choices.

Quoting Sisteract:

I agree.

The sooner people learn that food is for fuel and not a reward, event, punishment, activity and highlight of the day, the better.

KIDS should be encouraged to develop a healthy relationship with food from the get go.

MOST Americans are deficient in this area.

It affects health and hc costs-

I would think that fiscal conservies would get it- it's $$$$$.

Quoting Bookwormy:

I really hope this is a private schoo that receives no public funding for meals! That is disgusting!


Quoting Godgaveme4:

 Our ASB just sold boxes of krispy Kremes at lunch last week.  The kids loved it.  Next week the sophmores are selling candy.  All of it is for fundtraising.


And in the elementary the kids can choose ice cream as a side item.


I love my school!



 


 

 

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