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"Consider This" Part II: Home Economics, A Requirement For High School Graduation

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 This post is spun off/a continuation of my other post ("Consider This") about redesigning the food stamp program. In "Consider This", folks voiced the concern that many food stamp recipients don't know how to cook fresh foods, and many don't know how to properly store them. It is also a concern that Americans in general don't know how to budget.

So, as part II to "Consider This;", I'll ask you to, well..."Consider This:"

Why don't we make successful completion of a year-long home economics class a requirement for high school graduation? Of all the things we teach in schools, we aren't teaching kids how to balance a budget, shop wisely, cook and store food? I consider this far more important than algebra, yet algebra is a requirement for graduation in Ohio, and home economics is not.

Truly, common sense isn't so common anymore. And with so many parents working evenings, or working two jobs, how many American teenagers aren't being taught how to cook and manage finances?

What do you think? Home ec a requirement in high school: yay or nay?

 


"Roger that. Over."

R   A   D    I    O    H    E    I    D

by on Oct. 9, 2012 at 1:15 PM
Replies (21-30):
FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Oct. 9, 2012 at 9:30 PM


Quoting toomanypoodles:

 I'd rather see that than a class for putting a condom on a cucumber. 

Yes, young women AND men should be taught these skills! 

As homeschoolers, after the three Rs, we have really hit on homemaking skills. 

You are kidding, right?  Where do they teach students to put a condom on a cucumber?

"A bird doesn't sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a song." ~ Maya Angelou

GotSomeKids
by Silver Member on Oct. 9, 2012 at 9:33 PM

They use bananas in some districts.  Thank goodness they didn't have a fruit/veggie like visual aid when my son went through his "health" briefing last year.

Quoting FromAtoZ:


Quoting toomanypoodles:

 I'd rather see that than a class for putting a condom on a cucumber. 

Yes, young women AND men should be taught these skills! 

As homeschoolers, after the three Rs, we have really hit on homemaking skills. 

You are kidding, right?  Where do they teach students to put a condom on a cucumber?


lga1965
by Ruby Member on Oct. 9, 2012 at 9:33 PM

 

Quoting Donna6503:

I wish every time; I go to a store, and the products I buy, ring up to say $11.37 and I hand the person a twenty dollar bill, a dime, and two pennies. I just wish I wasn't given a look of major confusion by the person.

I wish the school would teach a basic understanding of the practical matters of money, commerce, and business, before, they would get too fancy with a year of home economics and all its subjective material into that topic.

 LOL. Nowdays kids are addicted to calculators and can't do math in their heads.

In 7th grade in our general math class, we covered all the practical financial matters from check book balancing to home loans to doing taxes,etc. Then we had home ec--cooking for a half year ( cooking from scratch,no mixes) and sewing. I could make dresses, blouses,shorts,,etc, by the end of the year. Home Ec was REQUIRED.

moneysaver6
by Gold Member on Oct. 9, 2012 at 9:41 PM

Absolutely!  I think this is a great idea that is long overdue for a return.

Donna6503
by Gold Member on Oct. 9, 2012 at 9:46 PM
LOL, you know I remember those days too; there are times when I think that instead of making "Home Ec" a "girls subject" and start allowing girls not to take the class.

Instead, to force the boys into taking those classes instead of making those classes an elective.

I just feel, that in today's world; Home Economics, wouldn't be taught correctly.


Quoting lga1965:

 


Quoting Donna6503:

I wish every time; I go to a store, and the products I buy, ring up to say $11.37 and I hand the person a twenty dollar bill, a dime, and two pennies. I just wish I wasn't given a look of major confusion by the person.

I wish the school would teach a basic understanding of the practical matters of money, commerce, and business, before, they would get too fancy with a year of home economics and all its subjective material into that topic.

 LOL. Nowdays kids are addicted to calculators and can't do math in their heads.


In 7th grade in our general math class, we covered all the practical financial matters from check book balancing to home loans to doing taxes,etc. Then we had home ec--cooking for a half year ( cooking from scratch,no mixes) and sewing. I could make dresses, blouses,shorts,,etc, by the end of the year. Home Ec was REQUIRED.


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jurnee14
by Member on Oct. 9, 2012 at 9:49 PM
1 mom liked this

This is a great idea. I love the fact that my sons school is a microsociety, so everyone there has a job they apply to, write resumees, go on interviews and get paid in school money. With the money the have to pay desk rent, taxes, and they have a bank and the students have a checking acct. The problem is thats the only school in the district with the program, and its only till 5th grade. I wish they taught more of these life skills on hs. I was really surprised when I hear my coworkers say they do laundry for their hs kids and also handle all thier hs age kids money. Mine had checking accts at 16, and they had to pay for some of their own things and budget for it. We also had assigned cooking days when they were 12 or so. I have had people look at me like I was crazy when I told them my kids do these things. or accuse me of being lazy with a comment like, I would rather my kids have a fun childhood than do my job. 

Lizardannie1966
by on Oct. 9, 2012 at 9:53 PM


Quoting Moniker:


Quoting Lizardannie1966:

It used to be an offered class and something taken as an elective.

It hasn't been in many years and generally due to cost for a given district. At least here in Arizona.

I've always felt it should have stayed as a class and more than an elective. An actual required class. Add to this, a required class on how to balance a budget, pay bills, good credit standings, how to NOT live outside of your means, etc.

If nothing more, a home ec class can teach kids how to do things on their own like cooking, cleaning, sewing a button, etc. Many parents do not teach these things at home.

I worked for 3 years in the registrar office of a large community college. I had college students come to me who couldn't address an envelope or fill out a check. I handled transcript requests and these were necessary steps in the process. Obviously we also registered students for classes. It is no exaggeration to say 90% ( I'm guessing low) of students who came in, put a course offering book on the counter and told me what they needed. They expected me and other staff, to make their schedule for them. For example, make all the times fit together and get the courses they needed. They would tie up the line and carry on if they had to stay too late, come on Fridays, didn't have a long enough gap or had too long of a gap, etc. It never occurred to them to do it themselves they expected us to do it for them. They expected to be catered to. They were too lazy to take the time to do it themselves or they didn't have the patience for it or some of them struggled to do it themselves. I often wondered how they got through their course work.


I'm guessing and I stress that, that perhaps a lot of districts and schools out there believe that this sort of thing either is or should be taught at home.

Problem is (and your experiences confirm this), they're not. A lot of kids are not learning these things from their parents and since so many schools are no longer offering any basic life skills types of courses--actually requiring them to take these classes--your profession will continue seeing this problem.

It's necessary to teach students what I call these basic life skills. Not all kids have the advantage of parents teaching this at home to begin with.

Carmel63
by Bronze Member on Oct. 9, 2012 at 10:30 PM
Ya, that would go over like a lead ballon in my district. This is an example why requirements like this need to be local. Some in my town think that fluff classes like phys Ed and health should be eliminated so their kids can take more academics that will get them into Yale. Adding as a requirement home ec at the high school level would give them an aneurysm.

They eliminated home ec and shop from the middle schools years ago to make way for health , foreign language, and engineering.

Yes, I understand that in some pockets these skills are not being taught in the home. This does not mean that teaching these skills in school should be mandated for all.
Dabberdoo
by on Oct. 9, 2012 at 10:37 PM
1 mom liked this

Home Ec and Shop were both requirements in my high school for both genders.  

And I don't understand where this assumption that all SNAP recipients are over weight bumbling idiots who don't know how to cook, budget, store food, etc.  Good grief!

LntLckrsCmQut
by on Oct. 9, 2012 at 10:39 PM

I agree. I am a firm believer in kids being domesticated. Around here, kids learn to do their own laundery at age 10. They cook meals once or twice a week, starting around the same age. The minute they are steady on their feet, and can comprehend the wax on/wax off method, they are handed a dust rag and sent on their way. lol

Quoting Arroree:

Personally i think we need to go a lot farther than that. We need to start having kids be taught basic survival and life skills starting in at least 3rd grade.

I recently had a convo with my step-mil and she told me how she needed to get her backyard leaves raked, mowed then rake up the grass and she really wished she had help. I looked over her shoulder at her 7 kids all aged 7-12 and i think i sputtered a bit. Then she went on to tell me how she had considered teaching the older boys how to rake *ages 10, 11, 11 and 12* but didn't think they were ready for it yet since they're all special needs and have an average mental age of about 9-11. I think i really started sputtering then as i pointed out that my special needs 5yr old could already rake the yard with only a little help. So she went on about how it would just be so much work to teach them, blah blah blah.

It was just a bunch of crap excuses. I've spent tons of time with these kids and they are all perfectly capable of raking the yard.  This is an entire household of special needs kids who will already have a tough time in life and they're being stunted by a mother who won't even consider teaching them basic life skills. Her 12yr old isn't even able to make his own sandwich for lunch because she's never given him the chance.

It's not just her and her household either. My younger sister recently asked how do you get your kids to do chores since her 7 and 8yr olds don't do anything and don't know how to do any of the chores. I had to actually teach her how to teach her children to do age appropriate chores.

And that's the kicker here, nobody seems to understand what's age appropriate anymore. Things have gotten to the point that so many people don't seem to think any kid under teen age should be able or expected to know how to do ANY chore.

Heck even my sons kindy teacher was shocked when i mentioned that he had made his own lunch. He's 5 not a baby, not a toddler, he's more than capable of tearing up some lettuce and throwing in some mushrooms and cherry tomatoes for his salad. The only parts of his lunch making i have to do is cut up the fruit for him. He LOVES making his lunches, it gives him a sense of accomplishment and a good boost to his self esteem, fills in that need to be self sufficient and independent. Personally i think all kids need this, being able to pick up their room, fix their lunch, etc, is good for them.



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