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Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Race as an indicator of student success?

Posted by on Oct. 11, 2012 at 7:23 AM
  • 35 Replies
Our FL Dept. of Education has approved a plan that involves using a student's race as a benchmark for expectations of success.
I personally feel that they should in NO way let the color of skin determine whether a student will be successful. I am smh at this one.


http://www.firstcoastnews.com/topstories/article/277607/483/Race-as-an-indicator-of-student-success


JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- Everyone wants their child to succeed, and while that may look different for each kid, it shouldn't be based on how they look.

But according to the Department of Education in Florida, the color of a student's skin may determine their ability to succeed.

Their new strategic vision for 2018 factors in a student's race to their performanceexpectations.

Marquita Wilson wants the best for her daughter.

Wilson's daughter is a senior at William Raines High School and she expects her to do well after graduation.

"The world is competitive and well rounded. You have to be able to present both," Wilson said.

But the new strategic vision generated by the Department of Education does not have the same expectations for all students.

The Board of Education just approved a plan for the next six years that factors in a students race as an indicator of success.

"The students should be measured for where they are, because the color of your skin doesn't determine that," she said.

The statistics laid out by the department of education tell a different story.

They broke the goal's down in math and reading, here are the reading numbers:

By 2018, 90 percent of Asian students are expected to be reading at grade level.

But only 80 percent of white students, 81 percent of Hispanic students, and 74 percent of black students are expected to do the same.

Seventy-four percent is not an acceptable number for Marquita Wilson.

"It's definitely a negative connotation, especially for those who can achieve higher, and now you're saying all you have to achieve is this," she said.

Before the Board of Education approved the strategic plan, some members raised the same questions.

"If Asians can have a goal of 90 percent in reading, why can't whites, and other subcategories. So I would just ask my fellow board members if we are happywith the signal this sends," said Board Member John Padget.

"It would be making a heck of a statement, wouldn't it John, to say this is what we expect Hispanics and African Americans will be able to accomplish compared to other groups and just leave it at that. You throw up a big question there," said Board Member Roberto Martinez.

Other subcategories were included in the plan, with disabled students, economically challenged students, and English-learners all under 80 percent reading by 2018.

Board Members in support of the strategic vision argued that the numbers they're aiming for in all categories would be an improvement on current levels.

Though statistically each racial group is not expected to improve at the same rate.

"I think we need to be realistic in our ability to impact those at the same degree," said Board Member Kathleen Shanahan.

The Board voted to approve the plan, which will now be the gold standard for every school in Florida.

Marquita Wilson thinks it's a shame the state doesn't hold all their children to the same standard.

"They all go to school together, they live in society together, work on the same jobs, so the standards should meet across the board for all of the kids," said Wilson.
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by on Oct. 11, 2012 at 7:23 AM
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Replies (1-10):
katzmeow726
by Platinum Member on Oct. 11, 2012 at 10:08 AM
2 moms liked this

I said something about this in another post.  We are setting the bar too low for our kids.  All this will do is give kids an excuse not to achieve higher goals.

Radarma
by "OneDar" on Oct. 11, 2012 at 10:22 AM

 Yeah, I also posted about this but no one was interested.

lga1965
by on Oct. 11, 2012 at 10:31 AM

 I don't think race as a determinate for success is true.

SuperChicken
by on Oct. 11, 2012 at 10:43 AM

Ummm, they are not saying that Asian students should strive for 90%, whites for 80%, Hispanics for 81%, and blacks only for 74%.   They are saying that they expect those those percentages of each racial category to meet "grade level." 

If people are going to complain, fine.  But at least complain about the actual issue.  And there is much to complain about there, imo.    It's rather ironic that people complaining about reading levels lack reading comprehension.

iamcafemom83
by Bronze Member on Oct. 11, 2012 at 10:53 AM
1 mom liked this
Ouch.

Well, why must there be such a staggering difference when they are all taught in the same classrooms?


Quoting SuperChicken:

Ummm, they are not saying that Asian students should strive for 90%, whites for 80%, Hispanics for 81%, and blacks only for 74%.   They are saying that they expect those those percentages of each racial category to meet "grade level." 


If people are going to complain, fine.  But at least complain about the actual issue.  And there is much to complain about there, imo.    It's rather ironic that people complaining about reading levels lack reading comprehension.

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iamcafemom83
by Bronze Member on Oct. 11, 2012 at 10:54 AM
Sorry for the repost. :(

It's a shocking thing to read.


Quoting Radarma:

 Yeah, I also posted about this but no one was interested.

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furbabymum
by Gold Member on Oct. 11, 2012 at 11:08 AM
3 moms liked this

 Probably cultural differences I'd think. There is only so much a teacher can do. A lot depends on the student and the parents. 

Quoting iamcafemom83:

Ouch.

Well, why must there be such a staggering difference when they are all taught in the same classrooms?


Quoting SuperChicken:

Ummm, they are not saying that Asian students should strive for 90%, whites for 80%, Hispanics for 81%, and blacks only for 74%.   They are saying that they expect those those percentages of each racial category to meet "grade level." 


If people are going to complain, fine.  But at least complain about the actual issue.  And there is much to complain about there, imo.    It's rather ironic that people complaining about reading levels lack reading comprehension.

 

iamcafemom83
by Bronze Member on Oct. 11, 2012 at 11:12 AM
I agree with it depending on the parents as well. Teaching doesn't stop in the classroom.
Cultural differences are one thing, but going by sheer race? I just think its nuts.


Quoting furbabymum:

 Probably cultural differences I'd think. There is only so much a teacher can do. A lot depends on the student and the parents. 


Quoting iamcafemom83:

Ouch.

Well, why must there be such a staggering difference when they are all taught in the same classrooms?



Quoting SuperChicken:


Ummm, they are not saying that Asian students should strive for 90%, whites for 80%, Hispanics for 81%, and blacks only for 74%.   They are saying that they expect those those percentages of each racial category to meet "grade level." 



If people are going to complain, fine.  But at least complain about the actual issue.  And there is much to complain about there, imo.    It's rather ironic that people complaining about reading levels lack reading comprehension.


 

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mikiemom
by Ruby Member on Oct. 11, 2012 at 11:13 AM
1 mom liked this

I don't think skin color has ever been proven to have an impact on intelligence, this is nonsense at it's finest and a way to keep people of color from achieving success.

furbabymum
by Gold Member on Oct. 11, 2012 at 11:19 AM

 Well yes. I agree with you. My DS is mixed but I'm sure he'll identify himself as Hispanic as that is how he looks. My DH and his family are all highly intelligent and have college degrees and successful jobs. They've all been in the USA for a few generations though. It's not quite as easy for those who are just immigrating or who have not had the kind of family support to succeed in school. If you compared Americans to the Japanese, well, there's a huge difference in how education is perceived. So, part of it is just a cultural thing I think.

Quoting iamcafemom83:

I agree with it depending on the parents as well. Teaching doesn't stop in the classroom.
Cultural differences are one thing, but going by sheer race? I just think its nuts.


Quoting furbabymum:

 Probably cultural differences I'd think. There is only so much a teacher can do. A lot depends on the student and the parents. 


Quoting iamcafemom83:

Ouch.

Well, why must there be such a staggering difference when they are all taught in the same classrooms?



Quoting SuperChicken:


Ummm, they are not saying that Asian students should strive for 90%, whites for 80%, Hispanics for 81%, and blacks only for 74%.   They are saying that they expect those those percentages of each racial category to meet "grade level." 



If people are going to complain, fine.  But at least complain about the actual issue.  And there is much to complain about there, imo.    It's rather ironic that people complaining about reading levels lack reading comprehension.


 

 

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