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A letter to the editor in today’s Rapid City Journal:

Life in a pre-SCHIP home taught lessons

Life in a pre-SCHIP home taught lessons We need to look at life before SCHIP. I remember a lady in the 1930’s who lost her husband at a young age, leaving her with eight children, the oldest 12. She lived in a small town in a small house. She had no car and worked in grocery stores, the courthouse and in the local bank (years later) until her death.

The mother was too proud to accept commodities. She couldn’t afford health insurance for herself or children and the family had a radio and telephone and running water (you ran out to get it and ran in with it). They had an outside toilet (a 2-holer). There were no school lunch programs. Breakfast was usually dry cereal and lunch was “leftovers” from the previous evening meal. Remarkably, all eight children attended college, the three boys under the GI bill. The mother was still working beyond age 65, so drew no Social Security. How do I know all this? She was my mother. I learned from her, becoming a single parent with three small children (oldest was five). We had no health insurance for the children. SCHIP is unearned welfare — called socialism.

DEAN VANCE
Spearfish

There is an irreplaceable dignity in doing things for your self, even in poverty. Having grown up poor, I know this.

Social welfare programs like SCHIP rob people of this dignity, and when they are extended to people making more than $80,0000 a year, it moves into the realm of the grossly absurd.

by on Oct. 12, 2012 at 12:27 AM
Replies (11-20):
Ktina11
by Bronze Member on Oct. 12, 2012 at 12:45 AM
1 mom liked this
State Children's Health Insurance Program


Quoting turtle68:

 what is SCHIP?


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paganbaby
by Teflon Don on Oct. 12, 2012 at 12:45 AM

That's awful :-(

And I agree. This is one persons story. Doesn't mean it reflected the majority of the poor's reality.

Quoting 1Giovanni:

This is one family. My great great grandparents had 13 children my grandfather died left my grandmother with those kids she worked herself to death at 30 leaving 10 children split up and some that no one wanted ended up on the streets trying to survive. Yes some of those kids made it or I wouldn't be here. My grandmother followed my great grandmother to the grave at very young age also.

Just because one family was able to do it doesn't mean it works for all of them. I think it is so sad if my great grandmother just had a little help, she wouldn't have died so young and 3 of my great aunts/uncles may have lived to be adults.


Lilypie - Personal pictureLilypie Breastfeeding tickers

Ktina11
by Bronze Member on Oct. 12, 2012 at 12:46 AM
I believe Tennessee calls it TennCare


Quoting 1Giovanni:

I think it is like Oregon's healthy kids program. It is health insurance for kids. There is 3 insurances through this program..1. state paid for poor. 2. working families that can afford some cost. 3. For all families that just needs more affordable insurance for kids.

Quoting paganbaby:

Good question. A google search turned up squat :-/

Quoting turtle68:

 what is SCHIP?




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paganbaby
by Teflon Don on Oct. 12, 2012 at 12:46 AM

Okay, thanks :-)

Quoting SandyLaxner:

I think SCHIP is health insurance for poor kids.  In IL it is called"All Kids"  Covers the kids only and you have to have a certain income level to qualify.


Lilypie - Personal pictureLilypie Breastfeeding tickers

Arroree
by Ruby Member on Oct. 12, 2012 at 12:54 AM

This

Quoting AdrianneHill:

People literally starved to death. It was also legal to sell tour kids as unpaid labor so that happened allot. Same idea then as is now: if those poverty stricken losers weren't bad people, God wouldn't have let them get so poor in the first place. This has to be their own fault. Their plight is actually a character flaw that needs to be shamed and beaten out of them so they don't try to act like their betters and can pull them up by the provided bootstraps."

I love America and her empathy


ReginaStar
by Gold Member on Oct. 12, 2012 at 12:57 AM
4 moms liked this

Children starved to death literally and died of diseases frequently.

MockingJay
by Member on Oct. 12, 2012 at 1:02 AM
6 moms liked this

Poverty is just so romantic @@

It's good for children to grow up lucky if their most basic needs were met, under-educated, unhealthy, and starving....said no person who grew up that way, EVER!

yourspecialkid
by Platinum Member on Oct. 12, 2012 at 3:08 AM
1 mom liked this

 I agree that some social programs take away pride and dignity...I think this is part of what leads to generational PA use.

We must have some programs though for those that cannot take care of themselves.

NutHouseMomma
by Silver Member on Oct. 12, 2012 at 6:19 AM
2 moms liked this
PA should.be available for those in need; however, the reform we need with the system should allow those using the assistance an easier transition to self-reliance and independence from PA. Right now PA has become almost an entitlement for some - they feel they should have assistance for free just because.... This mentality perpetuates the cycle and the influx of new recipients.
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futureshock
by Ruby Member on Oct. 12, 2012 at 6:57 AM
1 mom liked this

https://www.cbo.gov/publication/18638

The Design of the State Children’s
Health Insurance Program

The State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP)
was created by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (Public
Law 105-33), under title XXI of the Social Security Act.
The program provides federal funding that states can use
to expand health insurance coverage to uninsured chil-
dren living in families with income that is low but too
high to be eligible for Medicaid. Under broad federal
guidelines, the program grants states flexibility in how
they design their programs, including eligibility, benefits,
and cost-sharing provisions. (See Box 1 for a comparison
with Medicaid.)
Eligibility Criteria for Children
SCHIP was designed for uninsured children under age 19
living in families with income that is low but above Med-
icaid’s threshold.1 According to the SCHIP statute, states
may cover children living in families with income up to
200 percent of the federal poverty level or 50 percentage
points above their Medicaid threshold.2 States are also
allowed to disregard certain types of income and expenses
in determining eligibility for the program. Eligibility cri-
teria vary among the states. As of 2006, 26 states had a
threshold of 200 percent of the poverty level, 15 states set
the limit above 200 percent of the poverty level, and 9
states set it below 200 percent of the poverty level. North
Dakota had the lowest threshold, at 140 percent of
the poverty level, while New Jersey had the highest, at
350percent of the poverty level.3 In addition, variation
among states in their Medicaid thresholds means that
programs under SCHIP with equal thresholds may cover
different segments of the population. For example, both
Colorado and Kentucky have thresholds for SCHIP of
200 percent of the poverty level, but Kentucky’s program
covers a narrower range of people because its Medicaid
program covers children in families with income up to
150 percent of the poverty level, whereas for Colorado’s
Medicaid program, the threshold is the poverty level.4
States with a separate program under SCHIP (as opposed
to implementing SCHIP through an expansion of Med-
icaid) have some flexibility to control enrollment. For
example, such states can cap or freeze enrollment. They
can also impose waiting periods, typically lasting three to
six months, during which children must be uninsured—
a provision originally intended to discourage people from
dropping private health insurance coverage for children
in order to enroll them in SCHIP.
Eligibility Criteria for Adults
A number of states have used waiver authority to expand
coverage under SCHIP to adults. Covering parents may
help to increase participation among children, because
parents who are eligible may be more likely to enroll their
children also. In particular, section 1115 of the Social
Security Act gives the Secretary of Health and Human
Services the authority to waive certain statutory and regu-
latory requirements of Medicaid and SCHIP. The Secre-
tary has used that authority to allow states to expand
1. Children of state employees cannot be covered under a separate
program under SCHIP if they are eligible for coverage under a
state health benefits plan. In addition, SCHIP is generally limited
to citizens and to legal immigrants who have resided in the United
States for five or more years.
2. States are required to maintain the Medicaid threshold that was in
place just before SCHIP was enacted. That requirement, known
as “maintenance of effort,” prevents states from lowering their
Medicaid threshold in order to receive a higher matching rate
under SCHIP for children who would have otherwise been cov-
ered by Medicaid.
3. New Jersey, for example, has effectively expanded its threshold to
350 percent of the poverty level by disregarding all income
between 200 percent and 350 percent of the poverty level.
4. Those Medicaid thresholds apply for children between the ages of
6 and 19.

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