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A letter to the editor in today’s Rapid City Journal:

Life in a pre-SCHIP home taught lessons

Life in a pre-SCHIP home taught lessons We need to look at life before SCHIP. I remember a lady in the 1930’s who lost her husband at a young age, leaving her with eight children, the oldest 12. She lived in a small town in a small house. She had no car and worked in grocery stores, the courthouse and in the local bank (years later) until her death.

The mother was too proud to accept commodities. She couldn’t afford health insurance for herself or children and the family had a radio and telephone and running water (you ran out to get it and ran in with it). They had an outside toilet (a 2-holer). There were no school lunch programs. Breakfast was usually dry cereal and lunch was “leftovers” from the previous evening meal. Remarkably, all eight children attended college, the three boys under the GI bill. The mother was still working beyond age 65, so drew no Social Security. How do I know all this? She was my mother. I learned from her, becoming a single parent with three small children (oldest was five). We had no health insurance for the children. SCHIP is unearned welfare — called socialism.

DEAN VANCE
Spearfish

There is an irreplaceable dignity in doing things for your self, even in poverty. Having grown up poor, I know this.

Social welfare programs like SCHIP rob people of this dignity, and when they are extended to people making more than $80,0000 a year, it moves into the realm of the grossly absurd.

by on Oct. 12, 2012 at 12:27 AM
Replies (41-50):
mommajen32
by Platinum Member on Oct. 12, 2012 at 11:04 AM
2 moms liked this

People starved...

mommajen32
by Platinum Member on Oct. 12, 2012 at 11:05 AM
2 moms liked this

People had to give up their children and put them in orphanages....

AdrianneHill
by Platinum Member on Oct. 12, 2012 at 11:15 AM
1 mom liked this
In the cities you could put a kid to work for wages at five years old. In the rural areas, kids were probably put to work by then at their own farms at least. Before the child labor laws, it was a given that everyone who could work in a family, did work, and it saved on babysitting.
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paganbaby
by Teflon Don on Oct. 12, 2012 at 11:17 AM

That's very true.

Last time I was in the welfare office, I asked the lady there if they offered any job assistance. She directed me to a county website. All the jobs payed very well but they required crazy degrees and experience. Helicopter pilot, sewage management supervisor, building inspector. What person on Welfare is going to qualify for those??

Quoting NutHouseMomma:

PA should.be available for those in need; however, the reform we need with the system should allow those using the assistance an easier transition to self-reliance and independence from PA. Right now PA has become almost an entitlement for some - they feel they should have assistance for free just because.... This mentality perpetuates the cycle and the influx of new recipients.


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paganbaby
by Teflon Don on Oct. 12, 2012 at 11:18 AM

That's terrible :-(

Quoting batmansgirl:

Sounds like my Grandmother. Sad thing is when my Dad was a little boy he got Rheumatic fever from untreated strep throat. He has major heart and health problems because my Grandmother was unable to get antibiotics for him. More people/children died due to lack of access to medical help.


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Joqui
by Joqui on Oct. 12, 2012 at 11:23 AM

These resources are available now for a reason.

There is no way I am going to have my children without healthcare.  It isn't that I feel a sense of entitlement, but I believe children need to be covered, regardless of their background or economical status.

Raintree
by Ruby Member on Oct. 12, 2012 at 11:30 AM
2 moms liked this


Quoting survivorinohio:


Quoting MeAndTommyLee:

Families, neighbors and  the church -- yes, church a religious institution cared, supported, fed and housed people that were in need as a result of a husband/wife passing away or simply have financial woes.  Families did not shun one another because they were brought up with values, and love around the `family dinner table'.  You worked to survive, not live to work the way people do today.   The schools did not yet indoctine children to value their worth by how much money they earned etc.

Dont romanticize so much.  people died too.  Whole big loving families.

Thank you. I had a little laugh about 'Families did not shun one another because they were brought up with values, etc" because um.. what kind of alternate reality is this? You hit the nail on the head- she's romanticized an era that could be quite rough on people. My grandma lost two little boys in the years just after the depression- because doctors didn't know that a blood transfusion would help them survive in the days after their birth. She had to watch the elder of the two (my mother was the oldest- they were her younger brothers) linger and die over the span of a year. And no one could help.

Yeah, let's go back to those times. Oy vey.

paganbaby
by Teflon Don on Oct. 12, 2012 at 11:32 AM
1 mom liked this

I read it. His baby sister died in infancy and his twin brothers died of a preventable disease 6 months apart when they were 6 (?) His alcoholic father ran off and abandoned then. They had very poor shoes, ragged clothes, and mainly subsisted off of tea and bread. They finally had to move in with distant family who forced a sexual relationship on the mom.

Yeah they survived, well half of them at least, but at what cost?

Quoting Chellie13:

People had families.  People lived together, the nuclear family was still intact.  For those that had no families , the Church would be a source of help (for many).   Society is set up so everyone must work to support themselves, leaving no time for even coffee witih friends or relatives, let alone the ability to help one another in a very real , tangible way.  Think about Little House on the Prarie days.  Or did anyone ever read Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt? That took place in Ireland, but same concept of family being raised in dire poverty, and what they did to survive.    Makes me count my blessings for all I have. 


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paganbaby
by Teflon Don on Oct. 12, 2012 at 11:35 AM

Well said.

Quoting Woodbabe:

First of all, a family without running water and using an outhouse would probably have CPS banging on the door these days...not to mention the 8 kids and one adult in a two room shack.

During this time frame there wasn't any compulsory education so those kids were working (and being killed) in factories and fields by age six to bring in money for the family. Also, doctors would barter for their care...I don't see them accepting chickens or livestock in exchange for medicine anymore.

All of the laws we've passed 'to protect us' also serve to prevent us from living and raising our kids in this manner.


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paganbaby
by Teflon Don on Oct. 12, 2012 at 11:37 AM

Poor kids!

I wonder if their dad ever bought them that ice cream?

Quoting UpSheRises:

I'm sure people who were poor in 19th century America don't remember it so romantically. These kids sure don't...


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