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Someone gave me something

Posted by on Oct. 12, 2012 at 6:16 PM
  • 45 Replies

that I think may be a pagan symbol. I am Christian and I dont know how i feel about using it.  I believe it is called The Green Man.

Would you display a decorative object that promotes another belief system?

*EDIT*

Here is a picture of it I posted in the replies, as I said there if I use it it would be out in the garden by my little pond.


How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


by on Oct. 12, 2012 at 6:16 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Pema_Jampa
by SxyTaco on Oct. 12, 2012 at 6:18 PM
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I have many and I do have them around the house.

KelliansMom
by Bronze Member on Oct. 12, 2012 at 6:18 PM
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I have a few Celtic/Pagen symbolic stuff I have out as decor. I'm not pagan but I have deeply root Celtic roots so I don't see a problem with it. I have also seen some catholic crosses that I would love to have but I'm not catholic
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Sisteract
by Whoopie on Oct. 12, 2012 at 6:19 PM

Something like an Indian Dream catcher, yes.

An object explicitly tied to organized religion, probably not.

Donna6503
by Gold Member on Oct. 12, 2012 at 6:22 PM
3 moms liked this
Well it is better than herpes.

Just teasing; still, unless the symbol is truly evil, I feel there is no harm. There are many Muslims, Jews, and others religions that place Christmas display up ... There shouldn't be a problem.
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jillbailey26
by on Oct. 12, 2012 at 6:34 PM
1 mom liked this

I know Wiki isn't the *best* place to look, but it does have a variety of info on the Green Man.


"Let us therefore make every effort to do what leads to peace and to mutual edification"  Romans 14:19

furbabymum
by Gold Member on Oct. 12, 2012 at 6:36 PM
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 Yeah. We have a muslim prayer wheel that my DH got while he was deployed hanging in the house. It's beautiful!

eema.gray
by on Oct. 12, 2012 at 6:42 PM
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The history of symbology is fraught with various cultures and faiths repurposing symbols.  Witness the "swastika" which in the country of Georgia is simply a stylized cross and which in Buddism is a common motif in ancient temples.  Witness the countless arguments here about the meaning and symbols of Halloween, Christmas, and Easter.  I think, if it's an attractive piece, I would find a way to repurpose it's meaning to represent Christian beliefs and values.  You don't have to say anything to anybody about it but if someone asks, you can tell them what it means FOR YOU.  :-)

momma4AJ
by New Member on Oct. 12, 2012 at 6:45 PM

Superficially the Green Man would appear to be pagan, perhaps a fertility figure or a nature spirit, similar to the woodwose (the wild man of the woods), and yet he frequently appears, carved in wood or stone, in churches, chapels, abbeys and cathedrals, where examples can be found dating through to the 20th century. The earliest example of a green man disgorging vegetation from his mouth is from St. Abre, in St. Hilaire-le-grand, c 400 AD. [7]

To the modern observer the earlier (Romanesque and medieval) carvings often have an unnervingly eerie or numinous quality.[according to whom?] This is sometimes said[by whom?] to indicate the vitality of the Green Man, who was able to survive as a symbol of pre-Christian traditions despite, and at the same time complementary to, the influence of Christianity: rather than alienate their new converts, early Christian missionaries would often adopt and adapt local gods, sometimes turning them into saints.[8]

survivorinohio
by René on Oct. 12, 2012 at 6:48 PM

I have never thought about dream catchers as religious but you are right, they are.


Quoting Sisteract:

Something like an Indian Dream catcher, yes.

An object explicitly tied to organized religion, probably not.


How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


survivorinohio
by René on Oct. 12, 2012 at 6:52 PM

This one does not have anything coming from his mouth.  Here I will take a picture, I will be back.

Quoting momma4AJ:

Superficially the Green Man would appear to be pagan, perhaps a fertility figure or a nature spirit, similar to the woodwose (the wild man of the woods), and yet he frequently appears, carved in wood or stone, in churches, chapels, abbeys and cathedrals, where examples can be found dating through to the 20th century. The earliest example of a green man disgorging vegetation from his mouth is from St. Abre, in St. Hilaire-le-grand, c 400 AD. [7]

To the modern observer the earlier (Romanesque and medieval) carvings often have an unnervingly eerie or numinous quality.[according to whom?] This is sometimes said[by whom?] to indicate the vitality of the Green Man, who was able to survive as a symbol of pre-Christian traditions despite, and at the same time complementary to, the influence of Christianity: rather than alienate their new converts, early Christian missionaries would often adopt and adapt local gods, sometimes turning them into saints.[8]


How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


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