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Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Election map vs Civil War map

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by on Nov. 7, 2012 at 10:48 PM
Replies (31-40):
ms-superwoman
by Silver Member on Nov. 8, 2012 at 12:45 PM

Just an FYI for some who don't understand. Landmass is not equal to amount of people. Sure the majority of a state could vote red (Looking at a map seeing the majority of the state in red) but that does not mean more people voted red.

JustCJ
by Silver Member on Nov. 8, 2012 at 12:48 PM

yes that's why I said put up a county map. Most of the counties are red, except for the ones with big cities in them.

Quoting Sisteract:

Land mass doesn't count, actual people do-

Quoting JustCJ:

All the votes in the blue states...the majority of the blue counties..had big cities in them. Most counties in ALL of the states were red. Unfortunately, the "cities" with the larger populations decided and of course were blue...how much of that is minority? Racist? Sure as hell could be.



Aislinn
by Silver Member on Nov. 8, 2012 at 12:50 PM
1 mom liked this

 Well, thank God for the Republicans during the Civil War. The Dems were busy trying to stop it and starting groups like the Klu Klux Klan, so....

eema.gray
by on Nov. 8, 2012 at 12:56 PM

That is facinating.

sherry132
by Silver Member on Nov. 8, 2012 at 1:00 PM

Why is Oklahoma marked as a slave state? Oklahoma didn't achieve statehood until 1907. The only people in that god forsaken land was the military and the Indians, and they were not slaves, they were treated way worse. There isn't one plantation in Oklahoma. 

And the entire comparison is stupid. 

ETA:

African-Americans

The history of African-Americans in Oklahoma is a story unlike any to be found in the United states. African-Americans initially came to this region on the "Trail of Tears," as Indian slaves. Later, they came as cowboys, settlers, gunfighters, and farmers. By statehood in 1907, they outnumbered both Indians and first and second generation Europeans. They created more all-black towns in Oklahoma than in the rest of the country put together, produced some of the country's greatest jazz musicians, and led some of the nation's greatest civil rights battles.

One of the great omissions in history books was the role African-American soldiers played in the Civil War. Blacks first fought alongside whites during the Battle of Honey Springs, an engagement fought on July 17, 1863 on a small battlefield outside present-day Muskogee.

Black troops held the Union's center line in that battle, breaking the Confederate's center and giving the Union a critical win that secured both the Arkansas River and the Texas Road (the region's major transportation routes). This ensured the Union a solid foothold in Indian Territory -- one it never relinquished.

A year after the Civil War ended in 1865, Congress passed a bill providingBuffalo Soldiers provisions for black troops, what became the 9th and 10th cavalry. The 10th went on to be headquartered at Fort Gibson; the 9th was stationed at Fort Sill. Black soldiers built Oklahoma forts, fought bandits, cattle thieves, and Mexican revolutionaries (including Pancho Villa), and policed borders during the land runs. They also played a critical role in the Indian Wars of the late 1800s, earning the respect of Native Americans who gave them the name "Buffalo Soldiers."

After the Civil War, Freedmen and new African-American settlers in Oklahoma could vote, study, and move about with relative freedom. Pamphlets distributed throughout the South urged African-Americans to join land runs in Indian Territory, to create black businesses, black cities, and perhaps even the first black state. Pamphlets promising a black paradise in Oklahoma lured tens of thousands of former slaves from the South. Eventually 27 black towns grew to encompass 10 percent of Indian Territory's population.

Today many of Oklahoma's original black towns and districts are gone, but those that remain still host rodeos, Juneteenth celebrations, and community reunions.

http://www.otrd.state.ok.us/StudentGuide/history.html

smushy79
by Member on Nov. 8, 2012 at 1:08 PM

 It's cuz crazy posted it.

Quoting jcrew6:

You are comparing electoral map to civil war map?

Lets look at popular vote map. Tells a different story. Just goes to show someone( like the OP) can manipulate data to serve a narrow minded agenda.

 

Raesreppilf
by Member on Nov. 8, 2012 at 1:09 PM
1 mom liked this

I guess the maps show a nice comparison to how the parties flip flopped over the years.  The Republicans were mainly up north and the Democrats were mainly in the south with a splinter group comprised of immigrants on the east coast.  Back then the Republicans were anti slavery and anti lynching while the Democrats started the KKK and Jim Crow.

Quoting Aislinn:

 Well, thank God for the Republicans during the Civil War. The Dems were busy trying to stop it and starting groups like the Klu Klux Klan, so....


12hellokitty
by Platinum Member on Nov. 8, 2012 at 1:28 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting Aislinn:

 Well, thank God for the Republicans during the Civil War. The Dems were busy trying to stop it and starting groups like the Klu Klux Klan, so....


Perhaps the maps should be a wake up call for the once free states that are now in chains, dependent on the democratic party to provide them with food stamps and birth control... 

Aislinn
by Silver Member on Nov. 8, 2012 at 1:41 PM


Quoting Raesreppilf:

I guess the maps show a nice comparison to how the parties flip flopped over the years.  The Republicans were mainly up north and the Democrats were mainly in the south with a splinter group comprised of immigrants on the east coast.  Back then the Republicans were anti slavery and anti lynching while the Democrats started the KKK and Jim Crow.

Quoting Aislinn:

 Well, thank God for the Republicans during the Civil War. The Dems were busy trying to stop it and starting groups like the Klu Klux Klan, so....


 As I was asking in another post.. Where did the party of Abe Lincoln go? I am afraid it is lost, forever. Democrats are just as controlling as they were back in the day, they are just a tad smarter about it. Reps? Well, I have no idea what happened to them. 

meriana
by Platinum Member on Nov. 8, 2012 at 1:47 PM


Quoting krysstizzle:

Oh, come on now, that's a bit of a cop-out. That's half the truth. The other half is that individuals determine and shape the priorities. I.e. culture influences the individual, but the individual also influences the culture. 

Quoting meriana:

During the time of the Civil War, the south, which was largely agricultural, had a very different view, different priorities, etc. (which were influenced by their way of life),  than the industrialized (and becoming more industrialized) north. The maps, no matter which one is looked at, do show the differences between the industrialized or more industrialized, larger city areas and the more agricultural areas, rural ones. Ones way of life, their means of making a living, etc. will always influence their views, priorities and daily decisions as well as political ones.


Not really. The word has different meanings to different people, ie: a scientist talking about a bacterial culture as opposed to someone speaking of things learned from childhood such as language; traditions and beliefs that set them apart from other groups.  Culture is not static because individuals are not static. Take what one learns in history class about the ancient Greek culture. It is certainly different  today because the individuals, their society and way of life changed over time. Back around the 70's, there were whole groups referred to as hippies. They had their own way of life which was regarded as the "hippie culture". When individuals obtained jobs, homes, families, etc. they were no longer part of that culture and their view, priorities and decisions were of course, influenced by the way they made their living and providing for their families far more than by the cultural lifestyle they'd left.

Of course traditions, beliefs, etc. learned from childhood have an influence, sometimes a great deal of influence but overall, one's means of making a living and providing for their family as well as where one lives (industrialized city or rural faming area) is going to have a far greater impact on how they view current events; their priorities and decisions because those things relate directly to their survival and the survival of their families.

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