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Coincidence? Obama loses in every state that requires photo ID.

Posted by on Nov. 8, 2012 at 12:51 PM
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2 moms liked this


"Curiously, Obama lost in every state that requires a photo ID to be produced before voting. A list of closely contested state elections with no voter ID, which narrowly went to Obama include: Minnesota (10), Iowa (6), Wisconsin (10), Nevada (6), Colorado (9), New Mexico (5) and Pennsylvania (20). This amounts to a total of 66 electoral votes. When added to Romney’s total of 205 electoral votes, that would give Romney 271 electoral votes, enough votes to win even without Ohio or Florida.

Romney also likely had the states of Florida and Ohio stolen from him, which don’t require photo IDs. Ohio requires a non-photo ID. Would a library card do? Florida “requests” a photo ID, but doesn’t require it. So what happens if they request a photo ID and the illegal alien Haitian doesn’t have one? Do they just count the vote anyway?"
by on Nov. 8, 2012 at 12:51 PM
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Replies (1-10):
OHgirlinCA
by Platinum Member on Nov. 8, 2012 at 12:54 PM
5 moms liked this

 Here come the conspiracy theories...

***sigh***

katy_kay08
by on Nov. 8, 2012 at 12:54 PM
5 moms liked this

The Truth About Voter Fraud
PUBLICATIONS

Allegations of election-related fraud make for enticing press. Many Americans remember vivid stories of voting improprieties in Chicagoland, or the suspiciously sudden appearance of LBJ's alphabetized ballot box in Texas, or Governor Earl Long's quip: "When I die, I want to be buried in Louisiana, so I can stay active in politics." Voter fraud, in particular, has the feel of a bank heist caper: roundly condemned but technically fascinating, and sufficiently lurid to grab and hold headlines. Perhaps because these stories are dramatic, voter fraud makes a popular scapegoat. In the aftermath of a close election, losing candidates are often quick to blame voter fraud for the results. Legislators cite voter fraud as justification for various new restrictions on the exercise of the franchise. And pundits trot out the same few anecdotes time and again as proof that a wave of fraud is imminent.

Allegations of widespread voter fraud, however, often prove greatly exaggerated. It is easy to grab headlines with a lurid claim ("Tens of thousands may be voting illegally!"); the follow-up - when any exists - is not usually deemed newsworthy. Yet on closer examination, many of the claims of voter fraud amount to a great deal of smoke without much fire. The allegations simply do not pan out.

Download entire publication here.  

JustCJ
by Silver Member on Nov. 8, 2012 at 12:56 PM
1 mom liked this

I know my state NY didn't ask for my ID.

Quoting katy_kay08:

The Truth About Voter Fraud
PUBLICATIONS


Allegations of election-related fraud make for enticing press. Many Americans remember vivid stories of voting improprieties in Chicagoland, or the suspiciously sudden appearance of LBJ's alphabetized ballot box in Texas, or Governor Earl Long's quip: "When I die, I want to be buried in Louisiana, so I can stay active in politics." Voter fraud, in particular, has the feel of a bank heist caper: roundly condemned but technically fascinating, and sufficiently lurid to grab and hold headlines. Perhaps because these stories are dramatic, voter fraud makes a popular scapegoat. In the aftermath of a close election, losing candidates are often quick to blame voter fraud for the results. Legislators cite voter fraud as justification for various new restrictions on the exercise of the franchise. And pundits trot out the same few anecdotes time and again as proof that a wave of fraud is imminent.

Allegations of widespread voter fraud, however, often prove greatly exaggerated. It is easy to grab headlines with a lurid claim ("Tens of thousands may be voting illegally!"); the follow-up - when any exists - is not usually deemed newsworthy. Yet on closer examination, many of the claims of voter fraud amount to a great deal of smoke without much fire. The allegations simply do not pan out.

Download entire publication here.  


caito
by Silver Member on Nov. 8, 2012 at 12:57 PM
23 moms liked this


katy_kay08
by on Nov. 8, 2012 at 1:01 PM
10 moms liked this

Those states have been voting red long before their voter id laws went into effect 

katy_kay08
by on Nov. 8, 2012 at 1:02 PM
4 moms liked this

okay, so did you commit voter fraud?  

Quoting JustCJ:

I know my state NY didn't ask for my ID.

Quoting katy_kay08:

The Truth About Voter Fraud
PUBLICATIONS


Allegations of election-related fraud make for enticing press. Many Americans remember vivid stories of voting improprieties in Chicagoland, or the suspiciously sudden appearance of LBJ's alphabetized ballot box in Texas, or Governor Earl Long's quip: "When I die, I want to be buried in Louisiana, so I can stay active in politics." Voter fraud, in particular, has the feel of a bank heist caper: roundly condemned but technically fascinating, and sufficiently lurid to grab and hold headlines. Perhaps because these stories are dramatic, voter fraud makes a popular scapegoat. In the aftermath of a close election, losing candidates are often quick to blame voter fraud for the results. Legislators cite voter fraud as justification for various new restrictions on the exercise of the franchise. And pundits trot out the same few anecdotes time and again as proof that a wave of fraud is imminent.

Allegations of widespread voter fraud, however, often prove greatly exaggerated. It is easy to grab headlines with a lurid claim ("Tens of thousands may be voting illegally!"); the follow-up - when any exists - is not usually deemed newsworthy. Yet on closer examination, many of the claims of voter fraud amount to a great deal of smoke without much fire. The allegations simply do not pan out.

Download entire publication here.  



JustCJ
by Silver Member on Nov. 8, 2012 at 1:03 PM

Nope I'm honest.

Quoting katy_kay08:

okay, so did you commit voter fraud?  

Quoting JustCJ:

I know my state NY didn't ask for my ID.

Quoting katy_kay08:

The Truth About Voter Fraud
PUBLICATIONS


Allegations of election-related fraud make for enticing press. Many Americans remember vivid stories of voting improprieties in Chicagoland, or the suspiciously sudden appearance of LBJ's alphabetized ballot box in Texas, or Governor Earl Long's quip: "When I die, I want to be buried in Louisiana, so I can stay active in politics." Voter fraud, in particular, has the feel of a bank heist caper: roundly condemned but technically fascinating, and sufficiently lurid to grab and hold headlines. Perhaps because these stories are dramatic, voter fraud makes a popular scapegoat. In the aftermath of a close election, losing candidates are often quick to blame voter fraud for the results. Legislators cite voter fraud as justification for various new restrictions on the exercise of the franchise. And pundits trot out the same few anecdotes time and again as proof that a wave of fraud is imminent.

Allegations of widespread voter fraud, however, often prove greatly exaggerated. It is easy to grab headlines with a lurid claim ("Tens of thousands may be voting illegally!"); the follow-up - when any exists - is not usually deemed newsworthy. Yet on closer examination, many of the claims of voter fraud amount to a great deal of smoke without much fire. The allegations simply do not pan out.

Download entire publication here.  




katy_kay08
by on Nov. 8, 2012 at 1:05 PM
8 moms liked this

The "illegal alien Haitian" would have to have his/her name listed on the registered voter list, which prior to being on that list would have had to register and have his/her eligibility verified, so it's quite a stretch to think ineligible voters were lining up by the hundreds of thousands to "steal" the election from Romney.  

katy_kay08
by on Nov. 8, 2012 at 1:06 PM
2 moms liked this

Do you think you are alone in your honesty?  If you read the report I linked to you would learn that actual voter fraud is very uncommon.  

Quoting JustCJ:

Nope I'm honest.

Quoting katy_kay08:

okay, so did you commit voter fraud?  

Quoting JustCJ:

I know my state NY didn't ask for my ID.

Quoting katy_kay08:

The Truth About Voter Fraud
PUBLICATIONS


Allegations of election-related fraud make for enticing press. Many Americans remember vivid stories of voting improprieties in Chicagoland, or the suspiciously sudden appearance of LBJ's alphabetized ballot box in Texas, or Governor Earl Long's quip: "When I die, I want to be buried in Louisiana, so I can stay active in politics." Voter fraud, in particular, has the feel of a bank heist caper: roundly condemned but technically fascinating, and sufficiently lurid to grab and hold headlines. Perhaps because these stories are dramatic, voter fraud makes a popular scapegoat. In the aftermath of a close election, losing candidates are often quick to blame voter fraud for the results. Legislators cite voter fraud as justification for various new restrictions on the exercise of the franchise. And pundits trot out the same few anecdotes time and again as proof that a wave of fraud is imminent.

Allegations of widespread voter fraud, however, often prove greatly exaggerated. It is easy to grab headlines with a lurid claim ("Tens of thousands may be voting illegally!"); the follow-up - when any exists - is not usually deemed newsworthy. Yet on closer examination, many of the claims of voter fraud amount to a great deal of smoke without much fire. The allegations simply do not pan out.

Download entire publication here.  





ChancesMommy07
by Silver Member on Nov. 8, 2012 at 1:06 PM
9 moms liked this

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