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Hostess treats are sold out already and I will never have another snowball?

I haz a sad:(

How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


by on Nov. 17, 2012 at 1:07 PM
Replies (21-30):
Sisteract
by Whoopie on Nov. 17, 2012 at 1:59 PM

TY-

I can not believe that people eat this- it's not even food.

Quoting krysstizzle:

To make everyone feel better about twinkies and other "goodies" falling by the wayside, just think of this ;)

The Twinkie: Ingredients Revealed


Five ingredients come from rocks.

This got my attention. However, it only got worse when I discovered that the ingredients come from phosphate mines in Idaho, gypsum mines in Oklahoma, and oil fields in China. Okay, so now I was wondering if I was watching a real news story—come to find out, I was.

The Twinkie, which was created during the Depression, contains thirty-nine ingredients. One of those ingredients is a preservative, sorbic acid. Sorbic acid is an ingredient I see on many packages, and I have never thought twice about it. But author Steve Ettlinger did. He found that sorbic acid is actually derived from natural gas.

If that isn’t shocking enough, he goes on to talk about other ingredients like cellulose gum, Polysorbate 60, and calcium sulfate. Apparently, these ingredients are also used in sheet rock, shampoo, and rocket fuel. No wonder Twinkies make kids run around like crazy and have even been used as a defense for murder!

Mr Ettlinger also found that the vitamins, artificial colors, and flavorings in Twinkies come from petroleum.

I started to wonder how this tasty treat made from gas and rocks can be so light and airy. In comes Mr. Ettlinger again. Apparently, it’s limestone that makes Twinkies light. And that tasty cream center—it’s got to be milk, right? No. It’s made of shortening; there is absolutely no cream in the cream.

I have to say I was curious to know what Hostess, the makers of the Twinkie, thought about Mr. Ettlinger’s claims. Well, here’s the quote that ran in my newscast:

Deconstructing the Twinkie is like trying to deconstruct the universe. We think the millions of people … would agree that Twinkies just taste great.—David Leavitt, Vice President Snack Marketing at Hostess.

The news story was inspired by Steve Ettlinger’s new book, Twinkie Deconstructed. Ettlinger uses the Twinkie to demonstrate where our processed food ingredients come from. Since the Twinkie is the product leader—yes, it’s a product and apparently, barely a food—it served as the perfect tool to show consumers what goes into our food.

Another newsworthy note—since so many of the ingredients come from overseas, there are hardly any regulations placed on them. We are all familiar with the recent paint issues from China. As for the Twinkie, many of the vitamins listed on its label come from China and are not regulated. There were a few other ingredients Ettlinger sourced, but he was unable to communicate with the agricultural or chemical manufacturer of those ingredients. They simply do not need to make themselves available.

To read more about the Twinkie and Steve Ettlinger, you can buy his book or see his Web site.

One last word for all of us who fried a Twinkie at some point in our lives … I guess we didn’t make it any less healthy.



Via http://www.divinecaroline.com/22106/35281-twinkie-ingredients-revealed#ixzz2CVY6HZXZ


survivorinohio
by René on Nov. 17, 2012 at 2:04 PM

Now Hush , dont you know ignorance is bliss?  ;-)

Quoting krysstizzle:

To make everyone feel better about twinkies and other "goodies" falling by the wayside, just think of this ;)

The Twinkie: Ingredients Revealed


Five ingredients come from rocks.

This got my attention. However, it only got worse when I discovered that the ingredients come from phosphate mines in Idaho, gypsum mines in Oklahoma, and oil fields in China. Okay, so now I was wondering if I was watching a real news story—come to find out, I was.

The Twinkie, which was created during the Depression, contains thirty-nine ingredients. One of those ingredients is a preservative, sorbic acid. Sorbic acid is an ingredient I see on many packages, and I have never thought twice about it. But author Steve Ettlinger did. He found that sorbic acid is actually derived from natural gas.

If that isn’t shocking enough, he goes on to talk about other ingredients like cellulose gum, Polysorbate 60, and calcium sulfate. Apparently, these ingredients are also used in sheet rock, shampoo, and rocket fuel. No wonder Twinkies make kids run around like crazy and have even been used as a defense for murder!

Mr Ettlinger also found that the vitamins, artificial colors, and flavorings in Twinkies come from petroleum.

I started to wonder how this tasty treat made from gas and rocks can be so light and airy. In comes Mr. Ettlinger again. Apparently, it’s limestone that makes Twinkies light. And that tasty cream center—it’s got to be milk, right? No. It’s made of shortening; there is absolutely no cream in the cream.

I have to say I was curious to know what Hostess, the makers of the Twinkie, thought about Mr. Ettlinger’s claims. Well, here’s the quote that ran in my newscast:

Deconstructing the Twinkie is like trying to deconstruct the universe. We think the millions of people … would agree that Twinkies just taste great.—David Leavitt, Vice President Snack Marketing at Hostess.

The news story was inspired by Steve Ettlinger’s new book, Twinkie Deconstructed. Ettlinger uses the Twinkie to demonstrate where our processed food ingredients come from. Since the Twinkie is the product leader—yes, it’s a product and apparently, barely a food—it served as the perfect tool to show consumers what goes into our food.

Another newsworthy note—since so many of the ingredients come from overseas, there are hardly any regulations placed on them. We are all familiar with the recent paint issues from China. As for the Twinkie, many of the vitamins listed on its label come from China and are not regulated. There were a few other ingredients Ettlinger sourced, but he was unable to communicate with the agricultural or chemical manufacturer of those ingredients. They simply do not need to make themselves available.

To read more about the Twinkie and Steve Ettlinger, you can buy his book or see his Web site.

One last word for all of us who fried a Twinkie at some point in our lives … I guess we didn’t make it any less healthy.



Via http://www.divinecaroline.com/22106/35281-twinkie-ingredients-revealed#ixzz2CVY6HZXZ


How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


krysstizzle
by on Nov. 17, 2012 at 2:04 PM

I thought about starting a post, but those kinds usually never get  any replies. People tend to ignore the fact that Mountain Dew has the same ingredients as flame retardant, and the fact that twinkies and most processed foods have petroleum by-products and carcinogens in them.

*shrug* I eat crap sometimes, too, but less and less. Every time I buy something processed, I have a raging internal dialogue and feel incredibly guilty. 

Quoting Sisteract:

TY-

I can not believe that people eat this- it's not even food.

Quoting krysstizzle:

To make everyone feel better about twinkies and other "goodies" falling by the wayside, just think of this ;)

The Twinkie: Ingredients Revealed


Five ingredients come from rocks.

This got my attention. However, it only got worse when I discovered that the ingredients come from phosphate mines in Idaho, gypsum mines in Oklahoma, and oil fields in China. Okay, so now I was wondering if I was watching a real news story—come to find out, I was.

The Twinkie, which was created during the Depression, contains thirty-nine ingredients. One of those ingredients is a preservative, sorbic acid. Sorbic acid is an ingredient I see on many packages, and I have never thought twice about it. But author Steve Ettlinger did. He found that sorbic acid is actually derived from natural gas.

If that isn’t shocking enough, he goes on to talk about other ingredients like cellulose gum, Polysorbate 60, and calcium sulfate. Apparently, these ingredients are also used in sheet rock, shampoo, and rocket fuel. No wonder Twinkies make kids run around like crazy and have even been used as a defense for murder!

Mr Ettlinger also found that the vitamins, artificial colors, and flavorings in Twinkies come from petroleum.

I started to wonder how this tasty treat made from gas and rocks can be so light and airy. In comes Mr. Ettlinger again. Apparently, it’s limestone that makes Twinkies light. And that tasty cream center—it’s got to be milk, right? No. It’s made of shortening; there is absolutely no cream in the cream.

I have to say I was curious to know what Hostess, the makers of the Twinkie, thought about Mr. Ettlinger’s claims. Well, here’s the quote that ran in my newscast:

Deconstructing the Twinkie is like trying to deconstruct the universe. We think the millions of people … would agree that Twinkies just taste great.—David Leavitt, Vice President Snack Marketing at Hostess.

The news story was inspired by Steve Ettlinger’s new book, Twinkie Deconstructed. Ettlinger uses the Twinkie to demonstrate where our processed food ingredients come from. Since the Twinkie is the product leader—yes, it’s a product and apparently, barely a food—it served as the perfect tool to show consumers what goes into our food.

Another newsworthy note—since so many of the ingredients come from overseas, there are hardly any regulations placed on them. We are all familiar with the recent paint issues from China. As for the Twinkie, many of the vitamins listed on its label come from China and are not regulated. There were a few other ingredients Ettlinger sourced, but he was unable to communicate with the agricultural or chemical manufacturer of those ingredients. They simply do not need to make themselves available.

To read more about the Twinkie and Steve Ettlinger, you can buy his book or see his Web site.

One last word for all of us who fried a Twinkie at some point in our lives … I guess we didn’t make it any less healthy.



Via http://www.divinecaroline.com/22106/35281-twinkie-ingredients-revealed#ixzz2CVY6HZXZ



krysstizzle
by on Nov. 17, 2012 at 2:05 PM

lol I figured since they were going out of business, I could do my part to make ya'll feel better ;)

Quoting survivorinohio:

Now Hush , dont you know ignorance is bliss?  ;-)

Quoting krysstizzle:

To make everyone feel better about twinkies and other "goodies" falling by the wayside, just think of this ;)

The Twinkie: Ingredients Revealed


Five ingredients come from rocks.

This got my attention. However, it only got worse when I discovered that the ingredients come from phosphate mines in Idaho, gypsum mines in Oklahoma, and oil fields in China. Okay, so now I was wondering if I was watching a real news story—come to find out, I was.

The Twinkie, which was created during the Depression, contains thirty-nine ingredients. One of those ingredients is a preservative, sorbic acid. Sorbic acid is an ingredient I see on many packages, and I have never thought twice about it. But author Steve Ettlinger did. He found that sorbic acid is actually derived from natural gas.

If that isn’t shocking enough, he goes on to talk about other ingredients like cellulose gum, Polysorbate 60, and calcium sulfate. Apparently, these ingredients are also used in sheet rock, shampoo, and rocket fuel. No wonder Twinkies make kids run around like crazy and have even been used as a defense for murder!

Mr Ettlinger also found that the vitamins, artificial colors, and flavorings in Twinkies come from petroleum.

I started to wonder how this tasty treat made from gas and rocks can be so light and airy. In comes Mr. Ettlinger again. Apparently, it’s limestone that makes Twinkies light. And that tasty cream center—it’s got to be milk, right? No. It’s made of shortening; there is absolutely no cream in the cream.

I have to say I was curious to know what Hostess, the makers of the Twinkie, thought about Mr. Ettlinger’s claims. Well, here’s the quote that ran in my newscast:

Deconstructing the Twinkie is like trying to deconstruct the universe. We think the millions of people … would agree that Twinkies just taste great.—David Leavitt, Vice President Snack Marketing at Hostess.

The news story was inspired by Steve Ettlinger’s new book, Twinkie Deconstructed. Ettlinger uses the Twinkie to demonstrate where our processed food ingredients come from. Since the Twinkie is the product leader—yes, it’s a product and apparently, barely a food—it served as the perfect tool to show consumers what goes into our food.

Another newsworthy note—since so many of the ingredients come from overseas, there are hardly any regulations placed on them. We are all familiar with the recent paint issues from China. As for the Twinkie, many of the vitamins listed on its label come from China and are not regulated. There were a few other ingredients Ettlinger sourced, but he was unable to communicate with the agricultural or chemical manufacturer of those ingredients. They simply do not need to make themselves available.

To read more about the Twinkie and Steve Ettlinger, you can buy his book or see his Web site.

One last word for all of us who fried a Twinkie at some point in our lives … I guess we didn’t make it any less healthy.



Via http://www.divinecaroline.com/22106/35281-twinkie-ingredients-revealed#ixzz2CVY6HZXZ



katy_kay08
by on Nov. 17, 2012 at 2:06 PM

Their news of closing should not have come as a surprise, they have been struggling financially for quite some time now.  

Claire-Huxtable
by on Nov. 17, 2012 at 2:07 PM

It's a tradition and I love it.   Raspberry zingers and hot chocolate while watching Charlie Brown specials.   Pretend you are above it all you want, but I would not trade anything for zingers and Charlie Brown with my kids or with my parents.  It is and will be a wonderful memory.  

But yeah, so many of you pretend to be above things like that.

Quoting Sisteract:

TY-

I can not believe that people eat this- it's not even food.

Quoting krysstizzle:

To make everyone feel better about twinkies and other "goodies" falling by the wayside, just think of this ;)

The Twinkie: Ingredients Revealed


Five ingredients come from rocks.

This got my attention. However, it only got worse when I discovered that the ingredients come from phosphate mines in Idaho, gypsum mines in Oklahoma, and oil fields in China. Okay, so now I was wondering if I was watching a real news story—come to find out, I was.

The Twinkie, which was created during the Depression, contains thirty-nine ingredients. One of those ingredients is a preservative, sorbic acid. Sorbic acid is an ingredient I see on many packages, and I have never thought twice about it. But author Steve Ettlinger did. He found that sorbic acid is actually derived from natural gas.

If that isn’t shocking enough, he goes on to talk about other ingredients like cellulose gum, Polysorbate 60, and calcium sulfate. Apparently, these ingredients are also used in sheet rock, shampoo, and rocket fuel. No wonder Twinkies make kids run around like crazy and have even been used as a defense for murder!

Mr Ettlinger also found that the vitamins, artificial colors, and flavorings in Twinkies come from petroleum.

I started to wonder how this tasty treat made from gas and rocks can be so light and airy. In comes Mr. Ettlinger again. Apparently, it’s limestone that makes Twinkies light. And that tasty cream center—it’s got to be milk, right? No. It’s made of shortening; there is absolutely no cream in the cream.

I have to say I was curious to know what Hostess, the makers of the Twinkie, thought about Mr. Ettlinger’s claims. Well, here’s the quote that ran in my newscast:

Deconstructing the Twinkie is like trying to deconstruct the universe. We think the millions of people … would agree that Twinkies just taste great.—David Leavitt, Vice President Snack Marketing at Hostess.

The news story was inspired by Steve Ettlinger’s new book, Twinkie Deconstructed. Ettlinger uses the Twinkie to demonstrate where our processed food ingredients come from. Since the Twinkie is the product leader—yes, it’s a product and apparently, barely a food—it served as the perfect tool to show consumers what goes into our food.

Another newsworthy note—since so many of the ingredients come from overseas, there are hardly any regulations placed on them. We are all familiar with the recent paint issues from China. As for the Twinkie, many of the vitamins listed on its label come from China and are not regulated. There were a few other ingredients Ettlinger sourced, but he was unable to communicate with the agricultural or chemical manufacturer of those ingredients. They simply do not need to make themselves available.

To read more about the Twinkie and Steve Ettlinger, you can buy his book or see his Web site.

One last word for all of us who fried a Twinkie at some point in our lives … I guess we didn’t make it any less healthy.



Via http://www.divinecaroline.com/22106/35281-twinkie-ingredients-revealed#ixzz2CVY6HZXZ



krysstizzle
by on Nov. 17, 2012 at 2:10 PM

Oh please, no one is pretending to be above anything. No one in here is claiming to be perfect. But ignoring the fact that when and if one does eat certain processed food-like products, one is in fact ingesting rocks, petroleum products, and carcinogens is just silly. 

Quoting Claire-Huxtable:

It's a tradition and I love it.   Raspberry zingers and hot chocolate while watching Charlie Brown specials.   Pretend you are above it all you want, but I would not trade anything for zingers and Charlie Brown with my kids or with my parents.  It is and will be a wonderful memory.  

But yeah, so many of you pretend to be above things like that.

Quoting Sisteract:

TY-

I can not believe that people eat this- it's not even food.

Quoting krysstizzle:

To make everyone feel better about twinkies and other "goodies" falling by the wayside, just think of this ;)

The Twinkie: Ingredients Revealed


Five ingredients come from rocks.

This got my attention. However, it only got worse when I discovered that the ingredients come from phosphate mines in Idaho, gypsum mines in Oklahoma, and oil fields in China. Okay, so now I was wondering if I was watching a real news story—come to find out, I was.

The Twinkie, which was created during the Depression, contains thirty-nine ingredients. One of those ingredients is a preservative, sorbic acid. Sorbic acid is an ingredient I see on many packages, and I have never thought twice about it. But author Steve Ettlinger did. He found that sorbic acid is actually derived from natural gas.

If that isn’t shocking enough, he goes on to talk about other ingredients like cellulose gum, Polysorbate 60, and calcium sulfate. Apparently, these ingredients are also used in sheet rock, shampoo, and rocket fuel. No wonder Twinkies make kids run around like crazy and have even been used as a defense for murder!

Mr Ettlinger also found that the vitamins, artificial colors, and flavorings in Twinkies come from petroleum.

I started to wonder how this tasty treat made from gas and rocks can be so light and airy. In comes Mr. Ettlinger again. Apparently, it’s limestone that makes Twinkies light. And that tasty cream center—it’s got to be milk, right? No. It’s made of shortening; there is absolutely no cream in the cream.

I have to say I was curious to know what Hostess, the makers of the Twinkie, thought about Mr. Ettlinger’s claims. Well, here’s the quote that ran in my newscast:

Deconstructing the Twinkie is like trying to deconstruct the universe. We think the millions of people … would agree that Twinkies just taste great.—David Leavitt, Vice President Snack Marketing at Hostess.

The news story was inspired by Steve Ettlinger’s new book, Twinkie Deconstructed. Ettlinger uses the Twinkie to demonstrate where our processed food ingredients come from. Since the Twinkie is the product leader—yes, it’s a product and apparently, barely a food—it served as the perfect tool to show consumers what goes into our food.

Another newsworthy note—since so many of the ingredients come from overseas, there are hardly any regulations placed on them. We are all familiar with the recent paint issues from China. As for the Twinkie, many of the vitamins listed on its label come from China and are not regulated. There were a few other ingredients Ettlinger sourced, but he was unable to communicate with the agricultural or chemical manufacturer of those ingredients. They simply do not need to make themselves available.

To read more about the Twinkie and Steve Ettlinger, you can buy his book or see his Web site.

One last word for all of us who fried a Twinkie at some point in our lives … I guess we didn’t make it any less healthy.



Via http://www.divinecaroline.com/22106/35281-twinkie-ingredients-revealed#ixzz2CVY6HZXZ




Claire-Huxtable
by on Nov. 17, 2012 at 2:12 PM

Actually when someone claims I cannot believe people eat that, yes they are claiming they are above it.

Quoting krysstizzle:

Oh please, no one is pretending to be above anything. No one in here is claiming to be perfect. But ignoring the fact that when and if one does eat certain processed food-like products, one is in fact ingesting rocks, petroleum products, and carcinogens is just silly. 

Quoting Claire-Huxtable:

It's a tradition and I love it.   Raspberry zingers and hot chocolate while watching Charlie Brown specials.   Pretend you are above it all you want, but I would not trade anything for zingers and Charlie Brown with my kids or with my parents.  It is and will be a wonderful memory.  

But yeah, so many of you pretend to be above things like that.

Quoting Sisteract:

TY-

I can not believe that people eat this- it's not even food.

Quoting krysstizzle:

To make everyone feel better about twinkies and other "goodies" falling by the wayside, just think of this ;)

The Twinkie: Ingredients Revealed


Five ingredients come from rocks.

This got my attention. However, it only got worse when I discovered that the ingredients come from phosphate mines in Idaho, gypsum mines in Oklahoma, and oil fields in China. Okay, so now I was wondering if I was watching a real news story—come to find out, I was.

The Twinkie, which was created during the Depression, contains thirty-nine ingredients. One of those ingredients is a preservative, sorbic acid. Sorbic acid is an ingredient I see on many packages, and I have never thought twice about it. But author Steve Ettlinger did. He found that sorbic acid is actually derived from natural gas.

If that isn’t shocking enough, he goes on to talk about other ingredients like cellulose gum, Polysorbate 60, and calcium sulfate. Apparently, these ingredients are also used in sheet rock, shampoo, and rocket fuel. No wonder Twinkies make kids run around like crazy and have even been used as a defense for murder!

Mr Ettlinger also found that the vitamins, artificial colors, and flavorings in Twinkies come from petroleum.

I started to wonder how this tasty treat made from gas and rocks can be so light and airy. In comes Mr. Ettlinger again. Apparently, it’s limestone that makes Twinkies light. And that tasty cream center—it’s got to be milk, right? No. It’s made of shortening; there is absolutely no cream in the cream.

I have to say I was curious to know what Hostess, the makers of the Twinkie, thought about Mr. Ettlinger’s claims. Well, here’s the quote that ran in my newscast:

Deconstructing the Twinkie is like trying to deconstruct the universe. We think the millions of people … would agree that Twinkies just taste great.—David Leavitt, Vice President Snack Marketing at Hostess.

The news story was inspired by Steve Ettlinger’s new book, Twinkie Deconstructed. Ettlinger uses the Twinkie to demonstrate where our processed food ingredients come from. Since the Twinkie is the product leader—yes, it’s a product and apparently, barely a food—it served as the perfect tool to show consumers what goes into our food.

Another newsworthy note—since so many of the ingredients come from overseas, there are hardly any regulations placed on them. We are all familiar with the recent paint issues from China. As for the Twinkie, many of the vitamins listed on its label come from China and are not regulated. There were a few other ingredients Ettlinger sourced, but he was unable to communicate with the agricultural or chemical manufacturer of those ingredients. They simply do not need to make themselves available.

To read more about the Twinkie and Steve Ettlinger, you can buy his book or see his Web site.

One last word for all of us who fried a Twinkie at some point in our lives … I guess we didn’t make it any less healthy.



Via http://www.divinecaroline.com/22106/35281-twinkie-ingredients-revealed#ixzz2CVY6HZXZ





krysstizzle
by on Nov. 17, 2012 at 2:14 PM

I can't believe a lot of things that happen in this world. That doesn't mean I feel I am above everything and everyone in life that I have that particular opinion on. 

Now, if someone were to say, "I can't believe that; obviously I am so much better than that person because I don't do that" -- then you would have a point. 

Quoting Claire-Huxtable:

Actually when someone claims I cannot believe people eat that, yes they are claiming they are above it.

Quoting krysstizzle:

Oh please, no one is pretending to be above anything. No one in here is claiming to be perfect. But ignoring the fact that when and if one does eat certain processed food-like products, one is in fact ingesting rocks, petroleum products, and carcinogens is just silly. 

Quoting Claire-Huxtable:

It's a tradition and I love it.   Raspberry zingers and hot chocolate while watching Charlie Brown specials.   Pretend you are above it all you want, but I would not trade anything for zingers and Charlie Brown with my kids or with my parents.  It is and will be a wonderful memory.  

But yeah, so many of you pretend to be above things like that.

Quoting Sisteract:

TY-

I can not believe that people eat this- it's not even food.

Quoting krysstizzle:

To make everyone feel better about twinkies and other "goodies" falling by the wayside, just think of this ;)

The Twinkie: Ingredients Revealed


Five ingredients come from rocks.

This got my attention. However, it only got worse when I discovered that the ingredients come from phosphate mines in Idaho, gypsum mines in Oklahoma, and oil fields in China. Okay, so now I was wondering if I was watching a real news story—come to find out, I was.

The Twinkie, which was created during the Depression, contains thirty-nine ingredients. One of those ingredients is a preservative, sorbic acid. Sorbic acid is an ingredient I see on many packages, and I have never thought twice about it. But author Steve Ettlinger did. He found that sorbic acid is actually derived from natural gas.

If that isn’t shocking enough, he goes on to talk about other ingredients like cellulose gum, Polysorbate 60, and calcium sulfate. Apparently, these ingredients are also used in sheet rock, shampoo, and rocket fuel. No wonder Twinkies make kids run around like crazy and have even been used as a defense for murder!

Mr Ettlinger also found that the vitamins, artificial colors, and flavorings in Twinkies come from petroleum.

I started to wonder how this tasty treat made from gas and rocks can be so light and airy. In comes Mr. Ettlinger again. Apparently, it’s limestone that makes Twinkies light. And that tasty cream center—it’s got to be milk, right? No. It’s made of shortening; there is absolutely no cream in the cream.

I have to say I was curious to know what Hostess, the makers of the Twinkie, thought about Mr. Ettlinger’s claims. Well, here’s the quote that ran in my newscast:

Deconstructing the Twinkie is like trying to deconstruct the universe. We think the millions of people … would agree that Twinkies just taste great.—David Leavitt, Vice President Snack Marketing at Hostess.

The news story was inspired by Steve Ettlinger’s new book, Twinkie Deconstructed. Ettlinger uses the Twinkie to demonstrate where our processed food ingredients come from. Since the Twinkie is the product leader—yes, it’s a product and apparently, barely a food—it served as the perfect tool to show consumers what goes into our food.

Another newsworthy note—since so many of the ingredients come from overseas, there are hardly any regulations placed on them. We are all familiar with the recent paint issues from China. As for the Twinkie, many of the vitamins listed on its label come from China and are not regulated. There were a few other ingredients Ettlinger sourced, but he was unable to communicate with the agricultural or chemical manufacturer of those ingredients. They simply do not need to make themselves available.

To read more about the Twinkie and Steve Ettlinger, you can buy his book or see his Web site.

One last word for all of us who fried a Twinkie at some point in our lives … I guess we didn’t make it any less healthy.



Via http://www.divinecaroline.com/22106/35281-twinkie-ingredients-revealed#ixzz2CVY6HZXZ






wickedfiress
by Kellie on Nov. 17, 2012 at 2:14 PM
1 mom liked this
I bought my husband two boxes of the chocolate cupcakes. Lol he was like "just two?" Lolz
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
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