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Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Egypt's Mursi called "pharaoh", violent protests erupt

Posted by on Nov. 23, 2012 at 10:12 AM
  • 10 Replies

Protests rock Egypt after Morsi seizes sweeping new powers

By REUTERS
11/23/2012 15:54

Demonstrators storm Muslim Brotherhood HQ in Alexandria, pelt Port Said office with stones, and call for Egyptian president's ouster in Cairo after he is called "pharaoh," the new Mubarak for seizure of new powers.

Protests held for and against Morsi in CairoPHOTO: REUTERS

Protesters stormed the headquarters of the Muslim Brotherhood's party in Alexandria on Friday, throwing chairs and books into the street and setting them alight, after the Egyptian president granted himself sweeping new powers.

Supporters of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi and opponents also threw stones at each other near a mosque in the city, Egypt's second largest, a witness said.

Two cars had glass smashed as the clashes moved away from the area.

In Port Said, another port on the Mediterranean, hundreds of protesters gathered outside the Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice party headquarters and pelted it with rocks. Some tried to storm it but did not enter, another witness said.

In Cairo, thousands demonstrated against the decree issued on Wednesday night. 

Morsi called "pharaoh" for seizing new powers

Morsi's decree exempting all his decisions from legal challenge until a new parliament was elected caused fury amongst his opponents on Friday who accused him of being the new Hosni Mubarak and hijacking the revolution.

Morsi's aides said the decree was to speed up a protracted transition that has been hindered by legal obstacles but Morsi's rivals were quick to condemn him as a new autocratic pharaoh who wanted to impose his Islamist vision on Egypt.

"Morsi a 'temporary' dictator," was the headline in the independent daily Al-Masry Al-Youm and hundreds of protesters in Tahrir Square, the heart of the 2011 anti-Mubarak uprising, demanded Morsi quit, accusing him of launching a "coup".

Buoyed by accolades from around the world for mediating a truce between Hamas and Israel, Morsi on Thursday ordered that an Islamist-dominated assembly writing the new constitution could not be dissolved by legal challenges.

Morsi, an Islamist whose roots are in the Muslim Brotherhood party, also gave himself sweeping powers that allowed him to sack the unpopular general prosecutor and opened the door for a retrial for Mubarak and his aides.

The president's decree aimed to end the logjam and push Egypt, the Arab world's most populous nation, more quickly on its democratic path, the presidential spokesman said.

"President Morsi said we must go out of the bottleneck without breaking the bottle," Yasser Ali told Reuters.

The president said any decrees he issued while no parliament sat could not be challenged, moves that consolidated his powers but look set to polarize Egypt further, threatening more turbulence in a nation at the heart of the Arab Spring.

"The people want to bring down the regime," shouted protesters in Tahrir, echoing one of the chants that was used in the uprising that forced Mubarak to step down.

UN concerned Morsi hurting human rights

The decree is bound to worry Western allies, particularly the United States, a generous benefactor to Egypt's army, which effusively praised Egypt for its part in bringing Israelis and Palestinians to a ceasefire on Wednesday.

The West may become concerned about measures that, for example, undermine judicial independence. But one Western diplomat said it was too early to judge and his nation would watch how the decree was exercised in the coming days.

"We are very concerned about the possible huge ramifications of this declaration on human rights and the rule of law in Egypt," Rupert Colville, spokesman for the UN Human Rights Commissioner Navi Pillay, said at the United Nations in Geneva.

"The decree is basically a coup on state institutions and the rule of law that is likely to undermine the revolution and the transition to democracy," Mervat Ahmed, an independent activist in Tahrir protesting against the decree, said. "I worry Morsi will be another dictator like the one before him."

Leading liberal politician Mohamed ElBaradei, who joined other politicians on Thursday night to demand the decree was withdrawn, wrote on his Twitter account that Morsi had "usurped all state powers and appointed himself Egypt's new pharaoh

by on Nov. 23, 2012 at 10:12 AM
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Replies (1-10):
slashteddy
by Bronze Member on Nov. 23, 2012 at 10:19 AM

I'm still half-asleep and there's no way I read this right... did he seriously just declare himself Pharoah or...?

IhartU
by Gold Member on Nov. 23, 2012 at 10:19 AM
1 mom liked this

 Temporary Dictator? There is no such thing... lol.

yourspecialkid
by Platinum Member on Nov. 23, 2012 at 10:22 AM

 I read about this and frankly I am not surprised. 

stacymomof2
by Ruby Member on Nov. 23, 2012 at 1:49 PM
1 mom liked this

I'm am sorry but this is a total mischaracterization of the happenings there.  It is a bad position for Morsi to be in.  The truth is this:

They still have no constitution.

Judges have declared portions of the freely elected congress to be illegal and have dissolved it.

The corrupt Attorney General has been put out and will be criminally prosecuted.

The military is jockeying for power.

Morsi does not want the powerful (rich) corrupt people from the Mubarack regime to take hold, as they will if there isn't a new prosecutor general appointed.

So Morsi has taken the step of trying to oust the corruption in the legal system (from judges to Prosecutor General) and in doing so, and not wanting to turn control back to the military, and since the corrupt judges have dissolved the elected parliament, is now in charge of everything until a new Parliament is elected.

Please remember that these newspapers quoted are run by corrupt businessmen who are in danger of getting arrested if a less sympathetic prosecutor general is appointed.  They will be exaggerating and screeching at every steo made that puts the owners of the paper closer to answering for their crimes.

What Morsi needs to do, and quickly, is start with a decent judiciary, get a constitution approved (with term limits, and so far they are there and undisputed) and either have another election or reinstate the previous parliament which had been dissolved by people who were threatened by the will of the electorate.

Furthermore the actual protests are being exaggerated, to scare the Egyptians into fearing another dictatorship.  If I hear that the constitution is being written with unusual powers and no term limits for the President, as it was under Mubarack, I will start to worry.  As of now, people should pay more attention to the facts and not get swayed by bs propaganda put out by small interests only concerned about keeping their crimes from being prosecuted.


tooptimistic
by Kelly on Nov. 23, 2012 at 2:02 PM


Quoting IhartU:

 Temporary Dictator? There is no such thing... lol.


I know right?  Name another "temporary" dictator.

muslimah
by on Nov. 23, 2012 at 3:04 PM

 

Quoting slashteddy:

I'm still half-asleep and there's no way I read this right... did he seriously just declare himself Pharoah or...?

 No his oppents said "he is acting like a pharoah".


Click to join

tooptimistic
by Kelly on Nov. 23, 2012 at 3:37 PM

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-20468234

muslimahpj
by Ruby Member on Nov. 24, 2012 at 1:11 AM
1 mom liked this

Thank you. Im so sick of all this hate geared toward muslims and how they all must be evil and corrupt.

Quoting stacymomof2:

I'm am sorry but this is a total mischaracterization of the happenings there.  It is a bad position for Morsi to be in.  The truth is this:

They still have no constitution.

Judges have declared portions of the freely elected congress to be illegal and have dissolved it.

The corrupt Attorney General has been put out and will be criminally prosecuted.

The military is jockeying for power.

Morsi does not want the powerful (rich) corrupt people from the Mubarack regime to take hold, as they will if there isn't a new prosecutor general appointed.

So Morsi has taken the step of trying to oust the corruption in the legal system (from judges to Prosecutor General) and in doing so, and not wanting to turn control back to the military, and since the corrupt judges have dissolved the elected parliament, is now in charge of everything until a new Parliament is elected.

Please remember that these newspapers quoted are run by corrupt businessmen who are in danger of getting arrested if a less sympathetic prosecutor general is appointed.  They will be exaggerating and screeching at every steo made that puts the owners of the paper closer to answering for their crimes.

What Morsi needs to do, and quickly, is start with a decent judiciary, get a constitution approved (with term limits, and so far they are there and undisputed) and either have another election or reinstate the previous parliament which had been dissolved by people who were threatened by the will of the electorate.

Furthermore the actual protests are being exaggerated, to scare the Egyptians into fearing another dictatorship.  If I hear that the constitution is being written with unusual powers and no term limits for the President, as it was under Mubarack, I will start to worry.  As of now, people should pay more attention to the facts and not get swayed by bs propaganda put out by small interests only concerned about keeping their crimes from being prosecuted.



stacymomof2
by Ruby Member on Nov. 25, 2012 at 1:24 PM
1 mom liked this

People don't realize how tainted the news they get is.  Even the Egyptian people are struggling to find real news with the media still being owned by people who wish to color the revolution as a bunch of extremists in order to gain the sypathies of the west and scare moderates in Egypt away from the real issues (ridding the country of corruption and restructuring the government.)

The propaganda is flying.  Those who do not support Morsi are being fed lines of BS in order to scare them and turn them away from the new government.  It is much more complicated that articles like this one make it sound.  Most newspapers are the equivalent to fox news, blowing up issues and scaring people because they want things to go back to the way they were under Mubarak, so they can keep making money from theft.  

It's not good guys vs terrorists.  There is all sorts of issues to consider, even for those who did not vote for Morsi and wished for someone more moderate.  That doesn't mean they are being oppressed by militant "Islamists" (oh how I hate that word.)  It means they are in the heat of a democracy, struggling with issues of representation and how the constitution should be written.  All of this "violent protests!   Islamists!  Salafi! " bs is just a distraction, a drum beaten by a small group of people who are merely protecting their own interests, not the interests of the Egyptian people.

Quoting muslimahpj:

Thank you. Im so sick of all this hate geared toward muslims and how they all must be evil and corrupt.

Quoting stacymomof2:

I'm am sorry but this is a total mischaracterization of the happenings there.  It is a bad position for Morsi to be in.  The truth is this:

They still have no constitution.

Judges have declared portions of the freely elected congress to be illegal and have dissolved it.

The corrupt Attorney General has been put out and will be criminally prosecuted.

The military is jockeying for power.

Morsi does not want the powerful (rich) corrupt people from the Mubarack regime to take hold, as they will if there isn't a new prosecutor general appointed.

So Morsi has taken the step of trying to oust the corruption in the legal system (from judges to Prosecutor General) and in doing so, and not wanting to turn control back to the military, and since the corrupt judges have dissolved the elected parliament, is now in charge of everything until a new Parliament is elected.

Please remember that these newspapers quoted are run by corrupt businessmen who are in danger of getting arrested if a less sympathetic prosecutor general is appointed.  They will be exaggerating and screeching at every steo made that puts the owners of the paper closer to answering for their crimes.

What Morsi needs to do, and quickly, is start with a decent judiciary, get a constitution approved (with term limits, and so far they are there and undisputed) and either have another election or reinstate the previous parliament which had been dissolved by people who were threatened by the will of the electorate.

Furthermore the actual protests are being exaggerated, to scare the Egyptians into fearing another dictatorship.  If I hear that the constitution is being written with unusual powers and no term limits for the President, as it was under Mubarack, I will start to worry.  As of now, people should pay more attention to the facts and not get swayed by bs propaganda put out by small interests only concerned about keeping their crimes from being prosecuted.




muslimahpj
by Ruby Member on Nov. 25, 2012 at 2:17 PM
1 mom liked this

Exactly

Quoting stacymomof2:

People don't realize how tainted the news they get is.  Even the Egyptian people are struggling to find real news with the media still being owned by people who wish to color the revolution as a bunch of extremists in order to gain the sypathies of the west and scare moderates in Egypt away from the real issues (ridding the country of corruption and restructuring the government.)

The propaganda is flying.  Those who do not support Morsi are being fed lines of BS in order to scare them and turn them away from the new government.  It is much more complicated that articles like this one make it sound.  Most newspapers are the equivalent to fox news, blowing up issues and scaring people because they want things to go back to the way they were under Mubarak, so they can keep making money from theft.  

It's not good guys vs terrorists.  There is all sorts of issues to consider, even for those who did not vote for Morsi and wished for someone more moderate.  That doesn't mean they are being oppressed by militant "Islamists" (oh how I hate that word.)  It means they are in the heat of a democracy, struggling with issues of representation and how the constitution should be written.  All of this "violent protests!   Islamists!  Salafi! " bs is just a distraction, a drum beaten by a small group of people who are merely protecting their own interests, not the interests of the Egyptian people.

Quoting muslimahpj:

Thank you. Im so sick of all this hate geared toward muslims and how they all must be evil and corrupt.

Quoting stacymomof2:

I'm am sorry but this is a total mischaracterization of the happenings there.  It is a bad position for Morsi to be in.  The truth is this:

They still have no constitution.

Judges have declared portions of the freely elected congress to be illegal and have dissolved it.

The corrupt Attorney General has been put out and will be criminally prosecuted.

The military is jockeying for power.

Morsi does not want the powerful (rich) corrupt people from the Mubarack regime to take hold, as they will if there isn't a new prosecutor general appointed.

So Morsi has taken the step of trying to oust the corruption in the legal system (from judges to Prosecutor General) and in doing so, and not wanting to turn control back to the military, and since the corrupt judges have dissolved the elected parliament, is now in charge of everything until a new Parliament is elected.

Please remember that these newspapers quoted are run by corrupt businessmen who are in danger of getting arrested if a less sympathetic prosecutor general is appointed.  They will be exaggerating and screeching at every steo made that puts the owners of the paper closer to answering for their crimes.

What Morsi needs to do, and quickly, is start with a decent judiciary, get a constitution approved (with term limits, and so far they are there and undisputed) and either have another election or reinstate the previous parliament which had been dissolved by people who were threatened by the will of the electorate.

Furthermore the actual protests are being exaggerated, to scare the Egyptians into fearing another dictatorship.  If I hear that the constitution is being written with unusual powers and no term limits for the President, as it was under Mubarack, I will start to worry.  As of now, people should pay more attention to the facts and not get swayed by bs propaganda put out by small interests only concerned about keeping their crimes from being prosecuted.





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