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Sign the petition to stop Toys R' Us from Stereotyping out kids Toys.

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If you are tired of toys being stereotyped gender specific at Toys R' Us (cleaning/shopping toys for girls, muscle men/computer stuff for boys) than sign this petition!!

CHANGE.ORG


*It doesn't really bother me, but I have to say that at any store (not just T.R.U) it does get frustrating when there isn't a middle ground. Say legos that either have princess' and pastel colors or Monster trucks and Batman.  No just wild jungle animals or regular toy people houses. This is just an example of course. I only posted it in case there are some who really hate gender stereotypes in toys.

by on Dec. 5, 2012 at 12:23 PM
Replies (31-39):
FrumpyMama
by Bronze Member on Dec. 5, 2012 at 1:17 PM

I have those moments, trust me. Especially now that my dd is getting older. The Grandma's buy mostly pink clothes for her. It got to the point that I started purposefully putting her in her brothers hand me downs, just so there was balance.  I remember that Barbie too and the headache it gave me thinking about how the girls might turn out who had her.  Sadly they are teenagers now and some of them..................would rather go shopping because "Math is Hard."

Quoting olivejuice2:

I'm going to be the odd one out here, but I get disgusted when I go to the toy section in stores and see a wall of pink sparkles and princesses and another wall of bold colored trucks and army toys. I have no problem with letting kids choose the toys they want to play with, but I wish there were more gender neutral options. I want my daughter to be able to find girl toys that aren't pink and princess. I certainly won't ban pink or princess, but I will definitely encourage a variety of color choices and character types.

It may seem arbitrary to adults, but kids are vulnerable to social pressure from outside the family. It is important to me that my daughter does not internalize some of the gender stereotypes found in toys. About 10 years ago a friend of mine found a barbie doll that "spoke" phrases like "math is hard" and "lets go shopping". I was shocked that such a toy would be sold en mass in the 21st century. I want to do what I can to protect my daughter from that kind of damaging message.


kailu1835
by Ruby Member on Dec. 5, 2012 at 1:29 PM

It is human nature to classify people by gender.  All kids go through it.  My son got it in his head that certain jobs were boy jobs and certain jobs were girl jobs.  I have no idea where it came from, since some of the jobs he was insisting were boy jobs were like "dentist" and our dentist and everyone in the office are women, and some of the jobs he was insisting were girl jobs were things he'd never seen a girl do, like being a nurse (the 2 nurses at our pediatrician and the one we had at the ER were all men).  I think kids find it easier to know what's what when they have everything catalogued in their mind.  Men are daddies, Women are mommies (if they have kids), boys play the daddy, girls play the mommy when playing house, trucks are red because they're for boys and dolls wear pink dresses because they're for girls.

Quoting FrumpyMama:

True True! It shouldn't come off as rude or embarrassing to ask if it's a boy or girl. My dd was wearing her brothers hand me down camo coat, with her pink pants showing from underneath and people just assumed she was a boy because she was in camo. ? 

Quoting Paperfishies:

We should move away from colors being gender specific.


Quoting FrumpyMama:

Pink shopping carts rather than yellow shopping carts. I guess.

Quoting Paperfishies:

How are they gender specific?





babiesbabybaby development

sstripedmonkey
by Member on Dec. 5, 2012 at 1:31 PM
I could really care less what color toys are, our kids don't care either, this is stupid to me. Don't like it? Don't buy it simple as that
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MeAndTommyLee
by Gold Member on Dec. 5, 2012 at 1:35 PM

I have no interest in dictating to Toys-r-Us how to market their merchandise, nor am I offended by it.  Parents will purchase what the child asks for (not everything of course).  The company is not preventing a mom from buying her son a doll or her girl a motorized car, and so on.

LntLckrsCmQut
by on Dec. 5, 2012 at 1:36 PM

It isn't worth petitioning because I teach my kids that gender roles are dumb.

littlesippycup
by Bronze Member on Dec. 5, 2012 at 1:38 PM

That's cool you put this for people it bothers. We have princess tea carts, feather boas, pettiskirts, baby dolls, more girl stuff than you can imagine. We have a barely 2 yo DD. We also have 3 tonka trucks, a giant and medium size dump truck and some sort of loading truck on the porch. Little trucks in the toy box, little loaders, army men, footballs and soccerballs. I think you get the idea =) I think most people with common sense can find a happy balance.

ms-superwoman
by Silver Member on Dec. 5, 2012 at 1:39 PM

 I can put my son in everything blue, his hair is cut short in a fade and people still say she/her instead of him. lol

Quoting FrumpyMama:

True True! It shouldn't come off as rude or embarrassing to ask if it's a boy or girl. My dd was wearing her brothers hand me down camo coat, with her pink pants showing from underneath and people just assumed she was a boy because she was in camo. ? 

Quoting Paperfishies:

We should move away from colors being gender specific.


Quoting FrumpyMama:

Pink shopping carts rather than yellow shopping carts. I guess.

Quoting Paperfishies:

How are they gender specific?





olivejuice2
by Member on Dec. 5, 2012 at 1:46 PM
Quoting Woodbabe:




You are right that most kids tend to prefer a certain type of toy that is typical of their gender, and I think kids should be encouraged to play with the toys they want. As OP says, I want to see more gender neutral choices like jungle theme. Companies go to gender specific themes for toys that don't have to be gender specific (like puzzles and legos) because they sell more. Instead of buying one toy for all the kids, families buy one for the boys and one for the girls.

The problem for me is that current toys are often so polorized that they aren't always just an innocent toy preferred by mostly one gender or the other. When toys reinforce stereotypes like. Girls think "math is hard" I have a problem. Studies show that girls perform worse in math after being exposed to the stereotype that boys are better at math.
meriana
by Platinum Member on Dec. 5, 2012 at 4:00 PM

This whole thing is silly. Personally I like the fact that stores divide their toys into asles that are either dolls or trucks, etc. Can you imagine trying to find anything if all the toys were just lumped together on the shelves because a store didn't want to be accused of stereotyping? It'd be pretty frustrating to have to look around tons of dolls to find that truck or tons of trucks to find some girly dress up items. The way they do it makes it much easier for their customers to find what they are looking for.

I really can't figure out why people are so concerned about possible stereotyping of genders anyway. These days it  girls and boys do whatever activity appeals to them regardless. I really don't think the color of toys is going to cause them to decide they can or cannot do something. My 14 yr old dd has never been exposed to the idea that "math is hard, lets go shopping" , quite the opposite but she still says math is hard and she'd rather go shopping...LOL

Oh and if one wants toy appliances that are not "girl" colors, the Step-One brand had yellow toy appliances when dd was little, If the brand is still around, they probably still do. I bought them because they were much better made than what I was seeing in the typical toy depts.

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