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Teachers face child abuse charges for dragging blind boy through school by his feet (VIDEO)

Posted by on Dec. 6, 2012 at 2:34 PM
  • 109 Replies




Surveillance video that shows a teacher dragging a 6-year-old student on his back down the hallway inside Gonzales Community School in Santa Fe has her on administrative leave, police said.

KOB

Surveillance video from Gonzales Community School in Santa Fe shows a two teacher dragging a 6-year-old student down a hallway. 

Two teachers in New Mexico are facing child abuse charges after the school released a video showing them dragging a blind 6-year-old boy down a hall by his legs.

The teacher told cops that the special needs child at Gonzales Community School in Santa Fe refused to go to another classroom, so she dragged him there, local TV station KOB reported.

In the video, one woman can be seen towing the little boy by the ankles as he lays on his back. A second teacher joins in, while a third walks with the other two, watching the troubling incident.

Santa Fe Police Sgt. Andrea Dobyns told KOB the teacher has worked with the boy for a long time and that the two had a good relationship.

"We don't believe the teacher was intentionally trying to hurt the child, but our problem is the blatant neglect for his safety," Dobyns said.

"The boy's parents like this teacher,” she said.

 

drag 1206

KOB

The boy wasn't hurt in the incident. The two teachers are facing child abuse charges. 

 

The boy complained that his head hurt after the dragging, but otherwise wasn’t seriously injuried, the station reported.

The two teachers who dragged the boy would face child abuse charges, while the third teacher could face punishment for not reporting the incident.

The Santa Fe district attorney was reviewing the case, KOB reported.



by on Dec. 6, 2012 at 2:34 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Bieg9093
by Bronze Member on Dec. 6, 2012 at 4:50 PM
9 moms liked this

 A few thoughts...

1.  I would have picked the kid up and carried him fireman style.  But that's me.  I'm pretty sturdy, no back problems and it doesn't phase me when kids pull my hair.  I've never dropped a kid whom I was carrying.  But after seeing that, I may consider using their dragging techinique in the future.  It's much safer for both the child and the teacher.  I don't for a second believe that bs about it hurting his head.

2. What exactly do people WANT educators to do when children completely refuse to comply?  Are they just supposed to wait forever?  Are they supposed to ask all the other kids to just ignore highly disruptive students?  I know a high school where a single girl refused to comply with final exam testing rules.  Then she refused to leave the testing room.  The school decided to move EVERY OTHER STUDENT to another room rather than forcing the delinquent to comply or leave.  Does ANYONE really think THAT'S a good idea?

3. When educators actually stand up to kids who test limits, it teaches the kids to respect the limits.  When teachers are forced into the role of candy-asses who can't make kids follow rules or directions, it undermines the education of the child in question AND that of every other child who witnesses it. 

4.  Kid obviously didn't mind being dragged overmuch.  If it bothered him, then he would have chosen to walk.

 

tooptimistic
by Kelly on Dec. 6, 2012 at 4:55 PM
5 moms liked this

Yeah, my two disabled children will NEVER step foot in a public school.  Just one more reason why.  Holy crap, who does that to a child????

There were other options..

Call the principal into the classroom, call the child's parents, carry him to the principal's office.

You are not allowed to drag an employee or adult, why the heck would you drag a disabled child???

Debmomto2girls
by Platinum Member on Dec. 6, 2012 at 4:59 PM
1 mom liked this

 Are you kidding? This is a blind child, special needs child. I am sure there are better methods. He isnt an animal

Mom2Phoenix2011
by on Dec. 6, 2012 at 5:14 PM
1 mom liked this

 Please tell me you are tastelessly joking.

Quoting Bieg9093:

 A few thoughts...

1.  I would have picked the kid up and carried him fireman style.  But that's me.  I'm pretty sturdy, no back problems and it doesn't phase me when kids pull my hair.  I've never dropped a kid whom I was carrying.  But after seeing that, I may consider using their dragging techinique in the future.  It's much safer for both the child and the teacher.  I don't for a second believe that bs about it hurting his head.

2. What exactly do people WANT educators to do when children completely refuse to comply?  Are they just supposed to wait forever?  Are they supposed to ask all the other kids to just ignore highly disruptive students?  I know a high school where a single girl refused to comply with final exam testing rules.  Then she refused to leave the testing room.  The school decided to move EVERY OTHER STUDENT to another room rather than forcing the delinquent to comply or leave.  Does ANYONE really think THAT'S a good idea?

3. When educators actually stand up to kids who test limits, it teaches the kids to respect the limits.  When teachers are forced into the role of candy-asses who can't make kids follow rules or directions, it undermines the education of the child in question AND that of every other child who witnesses it. 

4.  Kid obviously didn't mind being dragged overmuch.  If it bothered him, then he would have chosen to walk.

 

 

Stevie, I am the proud mom of Phoenix, and the proud wife of Boston My OTR Trucker.  

Bieg9093
by Bronze Member on Dec. 6, 2012 at 6:37 PM
2 moms liked this

 Not for a second.  Granted, I currently work with ages 2-5, so I pick up kids much more often than teachers of 6 year olds would need to.  But the idea is the same...when you send a kid to me to teach, I'm gonna do what's right for that child.  And if the little rugrat, be he blind, labeled or just plain ornery, chooses to put his little hands on his little hips and refuse to budge then I will be budging him.  Why?  Cause it's what he needs, it's what his peers need to see AND it's damaging to him to let him act like a brat.  I will do anything for the kids in my care that is good for them.

The obvious exceptions would be kids who are medically too fragile to be manhandled or certain situations in which I'd choose a different technique should the child have sensory aversions.

 

Quoting Mom2Phoenix2011:

 Please tell me you are tastelessly joking.

Quoting Bieg9093:

 A few thoughts...

1.  I would have picked the kid up and carried him fireman style.  But that's me.  I'm pretty sturdy, no back problems and it doesn't phase me when kids pull my hair.  I've never dropped a kid whom I was carrying.  But after seeing that, I may consider using their dragging techinique in the future.  It's much safer for both the child and the teacher.  I don't for a second believe that bs about it hurting his head.

2. What exactly do people WANT educators to do when children completely refuse to comply?  Are they just supposed to wait forever?  Are they supposed to ask all the other kids to just ignore highly disruptive students?  I know a high school where a single girl refused to comply with final exam testing rules.  Then she refused to leave the testing room.  The school decided to move EVERY OTHER STUDENT to another room rather than forcing the delinquent to comply or leave.  Does ANYONE really think THAT'S a good idea?

3. When educators actually stand up to kids who test limits, it teaches the kids to respect the limits.  When teachers are forced into the role of candy-asses who can't make kids follow rules or directions, it undermines the education of the child in question AND that of every other child who witnesses it. 

4.  Kid obviously didn't mind being dragged overmuch.  If it bothered him, then he would have chosen to walk.

 

 

 

Thelmama
by Bronze Member on Dec. 6, 2012 at 6:38 PM

Before I watch, what in the world is he holding?

Thelmama
by Bronze Member on Dec. 6, 2012 at 6:42 PM

While they could have picked a better way, it does not look like they were being rough with him. Shoot I have dragged my kids down the hallway like that and they love it. They say drag us Momma or "mop the floor with us".  A game we have played since they were toddlers. They giggle the whole way.  LOL.  NOW they weren't yanking him or anything.  Would I want my child dragged, no, but I wouldn't necessarily say it was abuse but they need to rethink their methods with uncooperative children.

MeAndTommyLee
by Gold Member on Dec. 6, 2012 at 6:42 PM
2 moms liked this

Here is what I think.  If a parent would be thrown into jail for dragging their own child around by the feet for WHATEVER THE REASON, I see ZERO problem with the teacher charged.  Sorry...why is it that these teachers can do more to children in schools than a parent can in their own home.

tooptimistic
by Kelly on Dec. 6, 2012 at 6:44 PM
1 mom liked this

OMG..

I am so glad my autistic son or daughter with a mic-key button will never will in your classroom!!  I taught kindergarten and ran a day care for YEARS. Never drug a single child.  Not once. Never locked one in a closet or abused them in any way.  If you were to do that in one of my centers, you would have been fired.  

If a child acted like that, we called his or her parent, and had the parent come pick them.  If a child would have refused to leave a classroom, the teacher would have called me, and I would have stayed with child until an adult got there for the child,  while the rest of the class went outside or the lunch room.

You don't drag a child EVER.

Quoting Bieg9093:

 Not for a second.  Granted, I currently work with ages 2-5, so I pick up kids much more often than teachers of 6 year olds would need to.  But the idea is the same...when you send a kid to me to teach, I'm gonna do what's right for that child.  And if the little rugrat, be he blind, labeled or just plain ornery, chooses to put his little hands on his little hips and refuse to budge then I will be budging him.  Why?  Cause it's what he needs, it's what his peers need to see AND it's damaging to him to let him act like a brat.  I will do anything for the kids in my care that is good for them.

The obvious exceptions would be kids who are medically too fragile to be manhandled or certain situations in which I'd choose a different technique should the child have sensory aversions.

 

Quoting Mom2Phoenix2011:

 Please tell me you are tastelessly joking.

Quoting Bieg9093:

 A few thoughts...

1.  I would have picked the kid up and carried him fireman style.  But that's me.  I'm pretty sturdy, no back problems and it doesn't phase me when kids pull my hair.  I've never dropped a kid whom I was carrying.  But after seeing that, I may consider using their dragging techinique in the future.  It's much safer for both the child and the teacher.  I don't for a second believe that bs about it hurting his head.

2. What exactly do people WANT educators to do when children completely refuse to comply?  Are they just supposed to wait forever?  Are they supposed to ask all the other kids to just ignore highly disruptive students?  I know a high school where a single girl refused to comply with final exam testing rules.  Then she refused to leave the testing room.  The school decided to move EVERY OTHER STUDENT to another room rather than forcing the delinquent to comply or leave.  Does ANYONE really think THAT'S a good idea?

3. When educators actually stand up to kids who test limits, it teaches the kids to respect the limits.  When teachers are forced into the role of candy-asses who can't make kids follow rules or directions, it undermines the education of the child in question AND that of every other child who witnesses it. 

4.  Kid obviously didn't mind being dragged overmuch.  If it bothered him, then he would have chosen to walk.

 

 

 


Paperfishies
by Silver Member on Dec. 6, 2012 at 6:44 PM
The moment a student won't comply a parent needs to be called and that parents needs to be told, you hve 10 minutes to get here and take charge of your child. If you aren't here the police will be called.

Parents bitch and cry no matter what. Lets disturb their work day a few times and maybe they will wake the fuck up.


Quoting Bieg9093:

 Not for a second.  Granted, I currently work with ages 2-5, so I pick up kids much more often than teachers of 6 year olds would need to.  But the idea is the same...when you send a kid to me to teach, I'm gonna do what's right for that child.  And if the little rugrat, be he blind, labeled or just plain ornery, chooses to put his little hands on his little hips and refuse to budge then I will be budging him.  Why?  Cause it's what he needs, it's what his peers need to see AND it's damaging to him to let him act like a brat.  I will do anything for the kids in my care that is good for them.


The obvious exceptions would be kids who are medically too fragile to be manhandled or certain situations in which I'd choose a different technique should the child have sensory aversions.


 


Quoting Mom2Phoenix2011:


 Please tell me you are tastelessly joking.


Quoting Bieg9093:


 A few thoughts...


1.  I would have picked the kid up and carried him fireman style.  But that's me.  I'm pretty sturdy, no back problems and it doesn't phase me when kids pull my hair.  I've never dropped a kid whom I was carrying.  But after seeing that, I may consider using their dragging techinique in the future.  It's much safer for both the child and the teacher.  I don't for a second believe that bs about it hurting his head.


2. What exactly do people WANT educators to do when children completely refuse to comply?  Are they just supposed to wait forever?  Are they supposed to ask all the other kids to just ignore highly disruptive students?  I know a high school where a single girl refused to comply with final exam testing rules.  Then she refused to leave the testing room.  The school decided to move EVERY OTHER STUDENT to another room rather than forcing the delinquent to comply or leave.  Does ANYONE really think THAT'S a good idea?


3. When educators actually stand up to kids who test limits, it teaches the kids to respect the limits.  When teachers are forced into the role of candy-asses who can't make kids follow rules or directions, it undermines the education of the child in question AND that of every other child who witnesses it. 


4.  Kid obviously didn't mind being dragged overmuch.  If it bothered him, then he would have chosen to walk.


 


 


 


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