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Teachers face child abuse charges for dragging blind boy through school by his feet (VIDEO)

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Surveillance video that shows a teacher dragging a 6-year-old student on his back down the hallway inside Gonzales Community School in Santa Fe has her on administrative leave, police said.

KOB

Surveillance video from Gonzales Community School in Santa Fe shows a two teacher dragging a 6-year-old student down a hallway. 

Two teachers in New Mexico are facing child abuse charges after the school released a video showing them dragging a blind 6-year-old boy down a hall by his legs.

The teacher told cops that the special needs child at Gonzales Community School in Santa Fe refused to go to another classroom, so she dragged him there, local TV station KOB reported.

In the video, one woman can be seen towing the little boy by the ankles as he lays on his back. A second teacher joins in, while a third walks with the other two, watching the troubling incident.

Santa Fe Police Sgt. Andrea Dobyns told KOB the teacher has worked with the boy for a long time and that the two had a good relationship.

"We don't believe the teacher was intentionally trying to hurt the child, but our problem is the blatant neglect for his safety," Dobyns said.

"The boy's parents like this teacher,” she said.

 

drag 1206

KOB

The boy wasn't hurt in the incident. The two teachers are facing child abuse charges. 

 

The boy complained that his head hurt after the dragging, but otherwise wasn’t seriously injuried, the station reported.

The two teachers who dragged the boy would face child abuse charges, while the third teacher could face punishment for not reporting the incident.

The Santa Fe district attorney was reviewing the case, KOB reported.



by on Dec. 6, 2012 at 2:34 PM
Replies (11-20):
PiNkIsPuNk
by on Dec. 6, 2012 at 6:51 PM
1 mom liked this
I AGREE 150%!

Quoting MeAndTommyLee:

Here is what I think.  If a parent would be thrown into jail for dragging their own child around by the feet for WHATEVER THE REASON, I see ZERO problem with the teacher charged.  Sorry...why is it that these teachers can do more to children in schools than a parent can in their own home.

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
mom_dl6
by on Dec. 6, 2012 at 6:58 PM
1 mom liked this

I couldn't agree more here  !

Quoting MeAndTommyLee:

Here is what I think.  If a parent would be thrown into jail for dragging their own child around by the feet for WHATEVER THE REASON, I see ZERO problem with the teacher charged.  Sorry...why is it that these teachers can do more to children in schools than a parent can in their own home.


Sekirei
by Nari Trickster on Dec. 6, 2012 at 7:00 PM
2 moms liked this


Quoting MeAndTommyLee:

Here is what I think.  If a parent would be thrown into jail for dragging their own child around by the feet for WHATEVER THE REASON, I see ZERO problem with the teacher charged.  Sorry...why is it that these teachers can do more to children in schools than a parent can in their own home.

Oh wow.. I agree with you.!


I was happy with the school my son went to in Hawaii.. Every teacher knew how to handle the Sped children. .. All of them. 

My son is autistic... yes, he had his moments when the teachers needed to move him, because of a melt down or whatever.. they never drug him anywhere... the principal was called or the VP. I was also called... (Luckily, I worked at the school hahaha)

I was always happy with the way they handled my son and the other students. Sadly, we moved and he is now homeschooled, because he would not get the same treatment here as he did in Hi

Bieg9093
by Bronze Member on Dec. 6, 2012 at 7:09 PM

 In my children's elementary school, if the office calls a parent to school the parent might come up to the school.  Or the office might get a disconnected number.  Or the person who answers the phone can't understand English/relay a message.  Or the parent says they're coming and arrives 2 hours later.  I'm not exaggerating.

Add to that the fact that a 6 year old who wants Mommy or wants to go home and watch TV can use acting up as the golden key to getting EXACTLY what he wants.  How is THAT good for anybody involved?

Please look again at the video.  Does that child look like he's being abused?  He barely looks inconvenienced!  Whoopie for you that you go running for the phone every time a kid pitches a fit.  Me...I'd rather pick them up and carry them, and in doing so, TEACH them that bad behavior isn't going to get them what they want.

FTR, I don't abuse kids and I don't lock them in closets either.  I'll still probably carry rather than drag, just because it's worked for me so far.  But dragging is arguably safer than carrying.

Quoting tooptimistic:

OMG..

I am so glad my autistic son or daughter with a mic-key button will never will in your classroom!!  I taught kindergarten and ran a day care for YEARS. Never drug a single child.  Not once. Never locked one in a closet or abused them in any way.  If you were to do that in one of my centers, you would have been fired.  

If a child acted like that, we called his or her parent, and had the parent come pick them.  If a child would have refused to leave a classroom, the teacher would have called me, and I would have stayed with child until an adult got there for the child,  while the rest of the class went outside or the lunch room.

You don't drag a child EVER.

Quoting Bieg9093:

 Not for a second.  Granted, I currently work with ages 2-5, so I pick up kids much more often than teachers of 6 year olds would need to.  But the idea is the same...when you send a kid to me to teach, I'm gonna do what's right for that child.  And if the little rugrat, be he blind, labeled or just plain ornery, chooses to put his little hands on his little hips and refuse to budge then I will be budging him.  Why?  Cause it's what he needs, it's what his peers need to see AND it's damaging to him to let him act like a brat.  I will do anything for the kids in my care that is good for them.

The obvious exceptions would be kids who are medically too fragile to be manhandled or certain situations in which I'd choose a different technique should the child have sensory aversions.

 

Quoting Mom2Phoenix2011:

 Please tell me you are tastelessly joking.

Quoting Bieg9093:

 A few thoughts...

1.  I would have picked the kid up and carried him fireman style.  But that's me.  I'm pretty sturdy, no back problems and it doesn't phase me when kids pull my hair.  I've never dropped a kid whom I was carrying.  But after seeing that, I may consider using their dragging techinique in the future.  It's much safer for both the child and the teacher.  I don't for a second believe that bs about it hurting his head.

2. What exactly do people WANT educators to do when children completely refuse to comply?  Are they just supposed to wait forever?  Are they supposed to ask all the other kids to just ignore highly disruptive students?  I know a high school where a single girl refused to comply with final exam testing rules.  Then she refused to leave the testing room.  The school decided to move EVERY OTHER STUDENT to another room rather than forcing the delinquent to comply or leave.  Does ANYONE really think THAT'S a good idea?

3. When educators actually stand up to kids who test limits, it teaches the kids to respect the limits.  When teachers are forced into the role of candy-asses who can't make kids follow rules or directions, it undermines the education of the child in question AND that of every other child who witnesses it. 

4.  Kid obviously didn't mind being dragged overmuch.  If it bothered him, then he would have chosen to walk.

 

 

 

 

 

Bieg9093
by Bronze Member on Dec. 6, 2012 at 7:12 PM

 Unrealistic.  And you assume that the parents have the power to change the child's ways if they'd just "wake up."  Don't assume that anything short of parenting camp will fix anything.

Quoting Paperfishies:

The moment a student won't comply a parent needs to be called and that parents needs to be told, you hve 10 minutes to get here and take charge of your child. If you aren't here the police will be called.

Parents bitch and cry no matter what. Lets disturb their work day a few times and maybe they will wake the fuck up.


 

tooptimistic
by Kelly on Dec. 6, 2012 at 7:12 PM

I very rarely had to call a parent.. Its called classroom control.

I did look at the video, and it were my austistic son, there would be hell to pay.

Do you work at a center?  

Quoting Bieg9093:

 In my children's elementary school, if the office calls a parent to school the parent might come up to the school.  Or the office might get a disconnected number.  Or the person who answers the phone can't understand English/relay a message.  Or the parent says they're coming and arrives 2 hours later.  I'm not exaggerating.

Add to that the fact that a 6 year old who wants Mommy or wants to go home and watch TV can use acting up as the golden key to getting EXACTLY what he wants.  How is THAT good for anybody involved?

Please look again at the video.  Does that child look like he's being abused?  He barely looks inconvenienced!  Whoopie for you that you go running for the phone every time a kid pitches a fit.  Me...I'd rather pick them up and carry them, and in doing so, TEACH them that bad behavior isn't going to get them what they want.

FTR, I don't abuse kids and I don't lock them in closets either.  I'll still probably carry rather than drag, just because it's worked for me so far.  But dragging is arguably safer than carrying.

Quoting tooptimistic:

OMG..

I am so glad my autistic son or daughter with a mic-key button will never will in your classroom!!  I taught kindergarten and ran a day care for YEARS. Never drug a single child.  Not once. Never locked one in a closet or abused them in any way.  If you were to do that in one of my centers, you would have been fired.  

If a child acted like that, we called his or her parent, and had the parent come pick them.  If a child would have refused to leave a classroom, the teacher would have called me, and I would have stayed with child until an adult got there for the child,  while the rest of the class went outside or the lunch room.

You don't drag a child EVER.

Quoting Bieg9093:

 Not for a second.  Granted, I currently work with ages 2-5, so I pick up kids much more often than teachers of 6 year olds would need to.  But the idea is the same...when you send a kid to me to teach, I'm gonna do what's right for that child.  And if the little rugrat, be he blind, labeled or just plain ornery, chooses to put his little hands on his little hips and refuse to budge then I will be budging him.  Why?  Cause it's what he needs, it's what his peers need to see AND it's damaging to him to let him act like a brat.  I will do anything for the kids in my care that is good for them.

The obvious exceptions would be kids who are medically too fragile to be manhandled or certain situations in which I'd choose a different technique should the child have sensory aversions.

 

Quoting Mom2Phoenix2011:

 Please tell me you are tastelessly joking.

Quoting Bieg9093:

 A few thoughts...

1.  I would have picked the kid up and carried him fireman style.  But that's me.  I'm pretty sturdy, no back problems and it doesn't phase me when kids pull my hair.  I've never dropped a kid whom I was carrying.  But after seeing that, I may consider using their dragging techinique in the future.  It's much safer for both the child and the teacher.  I don't for a second believe that bs about it hurting his head.

2. What exactly do people WANT educators to do when children completely refuse to comply?  Are they just supposed to wait forever?  Are they supposed to ask all the other kids to just ignore highly disruptive students?  I know a high school where a single girl refused to comply with final exam testing rules.  Then she refused to leave the testing room.  The school decided to move EVERY OTHER STUDENT to another room rather than forcing the delinquent to comply or leave.  Does ANYONE really think THAT'S a good idea?

3. When educators actually stand up to kids who test limits, it teaches the kids to respect the limits.  When teachers are forced into the role of candy-asses who can't make kids follow rules or directions, it undermines the education of the child in question AND that of every other child who witnesses it. 

4.  Kid obviously didn't mind being dragged overmuch.  If it bothered him, then he would have chosen to walk.

 

 

 


 


tooptimistic
by Kelly on Dec. 6, 2012 at 7:16 PM


Quoting Thelmama:

Before I watch, what in the world is he holding?

I think it may be his cane.

Bieg9093
by Bronze Member on Dec. 6, 2012 at 7:29 PM

 I work at a nursery school.  I teach three year old classes.  Some kids start in my class when they are 2 1/2 and many turn 4 while in my class.  I also am temping for part of this year (pending eval results/cpse mtg) with a little dude in the 4 year old class.  He'll be turning 5 soon and is as impulsive a little guy as I have EVER seen.  He is like greased lightening and is a danger to himself and the other kids.  They assigned me as a one-on-one because the alternative would be kicking him out of school before a more appropriate placement can be determined and secured.  And that would be a shame.

I'm so fascinated that you keep referring to your "autistic son."  Is it okay for teachers to teach typical kids not to act like an ass, but we'd better not work too hard to teach the autistic ones?  Or do you think there's some high coincidence of special accomodations needed for both blind kids and autistic ones?  Let's just admit that ALL kids, regardless of what's going on up in their little brains, sometimes do the very typical thing called testing limits and need to be told "walk or I will carry you."

 

Quoting tooptimistic:

I very rarely had to call a parent.. Its called classroom control.

I did look at the video, and it were my austistic son, there would be hell to pay.

Do you work at a center?  

Quoting Bieg9093:

 In my children's elementary school, if the office calls a parent to school the parent might come up to the school.  Or the office might get a disconnected number.  Or the person who answers the phone can't understand English/relay a message.  Or the parent says they're coming and arrives 2 hours later.  I'm not exaggerating.

Add to that the fact that a 6 year old who wants Mommy or wants to go home and watch TV can use acting up as the golden key to getting EXACTLY what he wants.  How is THAT good for anybody involved?

Please look again at the video.  Does that child look like he's being abused?  He barely looks inconvenienced!  Whoopie for you that you go running for the phone every time a kid pitches a fit.  Me...I'd rather pick them up and carry them, and in doing so, TEACH them that bad behavior isn't going to get them what they want.

FTR, I don't abuse kids and I don't lock them in closets either.  I'll still probably carry rather than drag, just because it's worked for me so far.  But dragging is arguably safer than carrying.

Quoting tooptimistic:

OMG..

I am so glad my autistic son or daughter with a mic-key button will never will in your classroom!!  I taught kindergarten and ran a day care for YEARS. Never drug a single child.  Not once. Never locked one in a closet or abused them in any way.  If you were to do that in one of my centers, you would have been fired.  

If a child acted like that, we called his or her parent, and had the parent come pick them.  If a child would have refused to leave a classroom, the teacher would have called me, and I would have stayed with child until an adult got there for the child,  while the rest of the class went outside or the lunch room.

You don't drag a child EVER.

Quoting Bieg9093:

 Not for a second.  Granted, I currently work with ages 2-5, so I pick up kids much more often than teachers of 6 year olds would need to.  But the idea is the same...when you send a kid to me to teach, I'm gonna do what's right for that child.  And if the little rugrat, be he blind, labeled or just plain ornery, chooses to put his little hands on his little hips and refuse to budge then I will be budging him.  Why?  Cause it's what he needs, it's what his peers need to see AND it's damaging to him to let him act like a brat.  I will do anything for the kids in my care that is good for them.

The obvious exceptions would be kids who are medically too fragile to be manhandled or certain situations in which I'd choose a different technique should the child have sensory aversions.

 

Quoting Mom2Phoenix2011:

 Please tell me you are tastelessly joking.

Quoting Bieg9093:

 A few thoughts...

1.  I would have picked the kid up and carried him fireman style.  But that's me.  I'm pretty sturdy, no back problems and it doesn't phase me when kids pull my hair.  I've never dropped a kid whom I was carrying.  But after seeing that, I may consider using their dragging techinique in the future.  It's much safer for both the child and the teacher.  I don't for a second believe that bs about it hurting his head.

2. What exactly do people WANT educators to do when children completely refuse to comply?  Are they just supposed to wait forever?  Are they supposed to ask all the other kids to just ignore highly disruptive students?  I know a high school where a single girl refused to comply with final exam testing rules.  Then she refused to leave the testing room.  The school decided to move EVERY OTHER STUDENT to another room rather than forcing the delinquent to comply or leave.  Does ANYONE really think THAT'S a good idea?

3. When educators actually stand up to kids who test limits, it teaches the kids to respect the limits.  When teachers are forced into the role of candy-asses who can't make kids follow rules or directions, it undermines the education of the child in question AND that of every other child who witnesses it. 

4.  Kid obviously didn't mind being dragged overmuch.  If it bothered him, then he would have chosen to walk.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thelmama
by Bronze Member on Dec. 6, 2012 at 7:33 PM

It is thicker than that.  One of the teacher's is carrying a cane...it looks almost like a piece of long styrofoam...my mom has a cane, she is legally blind.

Quoting tooptimistic:


Quoting Thelmama:

Before I watch, what in the world is he holding?

I think it may be his cane.


Mom2Phoenix2011
by on Dec. 6, 2012 at 7:35 PM
1 mom liked this

 Then I wish you luck, because any teacher ever manhandles my child like that will know what it is like to truly be man handled. Do I believe that children should get away with bad behavior, absolutely not, but if there is a problem in which a child needs to be dragged or physically moved you had better be calling me or the police to handle the situation. Dragging a child or man handling them in that way is not acceptable. The fact that you feel this is acceptable makes me worry for the children that are in your care. There is a difference between picking up a two year old and moving them verses dragging a child down the hall.

Quoting Bieg9093:

 Not for a second.  Granted, I currently work with ages 2-5, so I pick up kids much more often than teachers of 6 year olds would need to.  But the idea is the same...when you send a kid to me to teach, I'm gonna do what's right for that child.  And if the little rugrat, be he blind, labeled or just plain ornery, chooses to put his little hands on his little hips and refuse to budge then I will be budging him.  Why?  Cause it's what he needs, it's what his peers need to see AND it's damaging to him to let him act like a brat.  I will do anything for the kids in my care that is good for them.

The obvious exceptions would be kids who are medically too fragile to be manhandled or certain situations in which I'd choose a different technique should the child have sensory aversions.

 

Quoting Mom2Phoenix2011:

 Please tell me you are tastelessly joking.

Quoting Bieg9093:

 A few thoughts...

1.  I would have picked the kid up and carried him fireman style.  But that's me.  I'm pretty sturdy, no back problems and it doesn't phase me when kids pull my hair.  I've never dropped a kid whom I was carrying.  But after seeing that, I may consider using their dragging techinique in the future.  It's much safer for both the child and the teacher.  I don't for a second believe that bs about it hurting his head.

2. What exactly do people WANT educators to do when children completely refuse to comply?  Are they just supposed to wait forever?  Are they supposed to ask all the other kids to just ignore highly disruptive students?  I know a high school where a single girl refused to comply with final exam testing rules.  Then she refused to leave the testing room.  The school decided to move EVERY OTHER STUDENT to another room rather than forcing the delinquent to comply or leave.  Does ANYONE really think THAT'S a good idea?

3. When educators actually stand up to kids who test limits, it teaches the kids to respect the limits.  When teachers are forced into the role of candy-asses who can't make kids follow rules or directions, it undermines the education of the child in question AND that of every other child who witnesses it. 

4.  Kid obviously didn't mind being dragged overmuch.  If it bothered him, then he would have chosen to walk.

 

 

 

 

Stevie, I am the proud mom of Phoenix, and the proud wife of Boston My OTR Trucker.  

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