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Ann Coulture attacks Latinos

Posted by on Dec. 7, 2012 at 7:16 PM
  • 21 Replies
Republicans looking to reach out to Latinos may want to avoid the advice of Ann Coulter.
The conservative pundit penned a column Wednesday in which she lashed out at the “deluge of unskilled immigrants pouring into the country” and portrayed Latinos as a lazy “underclass” looking for a government handout. Coulter titles the piece “America Nears El Tipping Pointo,” presumably to make a virtue of her ignorance of the Spanish language.
In fact, Latinos use less than their fair share of government benefits. According to a study released this year by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:
Non-Hispanic whites accounted for 64 percent of the population in 2010 and received 69 percent of the entitlement benefits. In contrast, Hispanics made up 16 percent of the population but received 12 percent of the benefits, less than their proportionate share -- likely because they are a younger population and also because immigrants, including many legal immigrants, are ineligible for various benefits.
Coulter implies in her piece that non-whites are “nitwits who deserve lives of misery and joblessness.” She singles out immigrants from Latin America as particularly “nitwitty,” saying they have too many babies out of wedlock, without citing a published source for the assertion. Nearly half of undocumented-immigrant households -- 45 percent -- consisted of a spouse or cohabiting couple with one or more children, compared to 34 percent of legal immigrants and 21 percent of the U.S. born, according to a 2010 Pew Hispanic Study.
Apparently unaware that Latinos do not depend disproportionately on government benefits, Coulter writes:
That's a lot of government dependents coming down the pike. No amount of "reaching out" to the Hispanic community, effective "messaging" or Reagan's "optimism" is going to turn Mexico's underclass into Republicans … Rather than being more hardworking than American, Hispanics actually work about the same as others, or, in the case of Hispanic women, less.
In fact, Latinos -- especially immigrants -- are more entrepreneurial than the general population. As Cristina Costantini points out in a piece for ABC/Univision, Hispanics created twice as many businesses as the general public since 2000, according to census data.
Mitt Romney won just 27 percent of the Latino vote, the lowest number of a presidential candidate since Bob Dole in 1996. Romney's failure to attract Hispanic voters likely owes to the hardline positions on immigration he took to attract the GOP's right wing, many of whom viewed the former Massachusetts governor as too liberal going into the party primary.
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by on Dec. 7, 2012 at 7:16 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Euphoric
by Bazinga! on Dec. 7, 2012 at 7:37 PM
3 moms liked this

 She is just a disgusting human being. Just vomitable.

annabl1970
by Platinum Member on Dec. 7, 2012 at 7:55 PM
2 moms liked this

Yes she is!

Quoting Euphoric:

 She is just a disgusting human being. Just vomitable.


rfurlongg
by on Dec. 7, 2012 at 7:57 PM
1 mom liked this
Ann Coulter attacking someone? How very out of character.
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sweet-a-kins
by Emerald Member on Dec. 7, 2012 at 8:00 PM
Lol



Quoting rfurlongg:

Ann Coulter attacking someone? How very out of character.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
bbroks
by on Dec. 7, 2012 at 8:03 PM

She lashed out at the "deluge of unskilled immigrants 'pouring into the country," and she portrayed Latinos as a lazy  "underclass" looking for a handout.   She singles out immigrants from Latin America as particularly "nitwitty," saying they have a lot of children out of wedlock.  Is this racist 

jhslove
by Bronze Member on Dec. 7, 2012 at 8:09 PM
1 mom liked this

This woman is a complete moron. First of all, what she's saying makes no sense and second, she's unbelievably inarticulate. I can't understand why anyone in their right mind would listen to anything she has to say. She, Donald Trump and Rush Limbaugh have just turned into charicatures of themselves, good for very little but comic relief.

lga1965
by on Dec. 7, 2012 at 8:09 PM
1 mom liked this

 Yeah....who HASN'T she attacked? LOL.

annabl1970
by Platinum Member on Dec. 7, 2012 at 8:11 PM

 

Quotes about Coulter
 
 
  • Coulter writes that conservative books sell like hot cakes, conservative talk show hosts dominate the airwaves, and the public shows every indication of leaning to the right and has some hostility to liberals and their positions. This being true, why does almost half the electorate vote for the National Socialist Democrat party (NSDP), which is owned lock, stock and barrel by the Marxist left?
  • Meet Ann Coulter. In her opinion, "liberals are racists", the French are "a bunch of faggots", only property owners should be allowed to vote, and anyone who disagrees with her is a "fatuous idiot" or "evil". In liberal Europe, such propositions are seldom aired, even in the most right-wing salons. In America, however, Coulter — blonde, fortysomething — is a regular guest commentator on news and talk shows such as Good Morning America, Hannity and Colmes, At Large with Geraldo Rivera and The O'Reilly Factor.
  • Why can't she say extremist Muslims rather than just Muslims? "If that'll make you happy. They slaughtered 3,000 people and I'm making unfair generalisations. I think we're even." Well, no, I don't think we're even, I begin to reply — and at this point I see a side of Ann Coulter that goes beyond the ludicrous opinions. I see someone who is not afraid to twist, distort, bully and lie in order to "win" her argument.
    Before I can elaborate or finish my sentence, she's off again. "Oh no, you're right, a generalisation is so much worse than slaughtering 3,000 people." I'm not saying that, I say. "I can't go beyond that, an ethnic generalisation is worse than slaughter. That is the essence of liberalism, you really do believe that. You get a glass of wine in you and you spit it out. You heard it. Making an un-PC generalisation is worse than the attack of 9/11." I'm not saying that, I repeat. "Yes, you are, you just said it." Of course I don't think that, I start, before I'm cut off again. "Liar!"
    The irony is that she claims to be above this kind of steamrolling. "The country is trapped in a political discourse that resembles professional wrestling," she has written. "Liberals are calling names while conservatives are trying to make arguments." But her view of what constitutes an argument seems to be a distinctly one-sided affair. I try again: "Do you think I have any point at all about..." I begin, but she interrupts again. "No!" She doesn't even know what my point was.
    • Sholto Byrnes, in "Ann Coulter: The blonde assassin" in The Independent (16 August 2004)
  • Is Ann Coulter a nutcase? If she is, she's one listened to and approved of by a frightening number of Americans. Surely, I say, hoping she will concede that she sometimes provokes to amuse, she doesn't believe everything she comes out with. "This is the shocking thing for your readers," she replies. "I believe everything I say."
    • Sholto Byrnes, in "Ann Coulter: The blonde assassin" in The Independent (16 August 2004)
  • I know a lot of the widows and family members who lost loved ones on 9/11. They never wanted to be a member of a group that is defined by the tragedy of what happened. I find it unimaginable that anyone in the public eye could launch a vicious, mean-spirited attack on people whom I’ve known over the last four and a half years to be concerned deeply about the safety and security of our country.
    Perhaps her book should have been called Heartless.
  • I think Ann Coulter is getting exactly what she wants, which is attention. … I think Ann Coulter often has intriguing and provocative things to say about the clash between liberalism and conservatism. I think some of the stuff she said here is over the line, and I have a pretty high tolerance for this kind of stuff because I believe that the more we argue, the better we are as a country, but I think some of the personal comments were just over the line.
    • Howard Fineman, as quoted in Soulless: Ann Coulter and the Right-Wing Church of Hate (2006) by Susan Estrich, p. 71
  • It's the ugliness of the charge that she is making, the ugliness of the words that she's using that are drawing attention to her… But it's almost as if she's a figure in a circus. And you're saying, "Oh, my God. Can you believe that?
    • David Gergen, as quoted in Soulless: Ann Coulter and the Right-Wing Church of Hate (2006) by Susan Estrich, p. 71
  • Ann Coulter has become a legend in her own mind.
    • Peter T. King, as quoted in Soulless: Ann Coulter and the Right-Wing Church of Hate (2006) by Susan Estrich, p. 71
  • Certain individuals continue to perpetuate negative stereotypes about Republicans. Especially Republican women. Who do I feel is the biggest culprit? Ann Coulter. I straight up don’t understand this woman or her popularity. I find her offensive, radical, insulting, and confusing all at the same time. But no matter how much you or I disagree with her, the cult that follows Coulter cannot be denied. She is a New York Times best-selling author and one of the most notable female members of the Republican Party. She was one of the headliners at the recent CPAC conference (but when your competition is a teenager who has a dream about the Republican Party and Stephen Baldwin, it’s not really saying that much).
    Coulter could be the poster woman for the most extreme side of the Republican Party. And in some ways I could be the poster woman for the opposite. I consider myself a progressive Republican, but here is what I don’t get about Coulter: Is she for real or not? Are some of her statements just gimmicks to gain publicity for her books or does she actually believe the things she says? Does she really believe all Jewish people should be “perfected” and become Christians? And what was she thinking when she said Hillary Clinton was more conservative than my father during the last election? If you truly have the GOP’s best interests at heart, how can you possibly justify telling an audience of millions that a Democrat would be a better leader than the Republican presidential candidate? (I asked Ann for comment on this column, including many of the above questions, but she did not answer my request.)
  • If Ann Coulter is trying to persuade people to her view, the personal attack is foolish …. I think this kind of stuff does conservatives more harm than good, because it basically reinforces what the left is trying to sell, that the right is mean, out of control, and whatever other adjectives you want to put in there.
    • Bill O'Reilly, as quoted in Soulless: Ann Coulter and the Right-Wing Church of Hate (2006) by Susan Estrich, p. 72
SEEKEROFSHELLS
by Platinum Member on Dec. 7, 2012 at 8:19 PM

 I can't think of anyone right off hand.

Quoting lga1965:

 Yeah....who HASN'T she attacked? LOL.


SEEKEROFSHELLS
by Platinum Member on Dec. 7, 2012 at 8:22 PM
1 mom liked this

 So why isn't she unemployeed and kicked to the curb? Ah I know, the media needs a troll.

Quoting annabl1970:


Quotes about Coulter
 
 
  • Coulter writes that conservative books sell like hot cakes, conservative talk show hosts dominate the airwaves, and the public shows every indication of leaning to the right and has some hostility to liberals and their positions. This being true, why does almost half the electorate vote for the National Socialist Democrat party (NSDP), which is owned lock, stock and barrel by the Marxist left?
  • Meet Ann Coulter. In her opinion, "liberals are racists", the French are "a bunch of faggots", only property owners should be allowed to vote, and anyone who disagrees with her is a "fatuous idiot" or "evil". In liberal Europe, such propositions are seldom aired, even in the most right-wing salons. In America, however, Coulter — blonde, fortysomething — is a regular guest commentator on news and talk shows such as Good Morning America, Hannity and Colmes, At Large with Geraldo Rivera and The O'Reilly Factor.
  • Why can't she say extremist Muslims rather than just Muslims? "If that'll make you happy. They slaughtered 3,000 people and I'm making unfair generalisations. I think we're even." Well, no, I don't think we're even, I begin to reply — and at this point I see a side of Ann Coulter that goes beyond the ludicrous opinions. I see someone who is not afraid to twist, distort, bully and lie in order to "win" her argument.
    Before I can elaborate or finish my sentence, she's off again. "Oh no, you're right, a generalisation is so much worse than slaughtering 3,000 people." I'm not saying that, I say. "I can't go beyond that, an ethnic generalisation is worse than slaughter. That is the essence of liberalism, you really do believe that. You get a glass of wine in you and you spit it out. You heard it. Making an un-PC generalisation is worse than the attack of 9/11." I'm not saying that, I repeat. "Yes, you are, you just said it." Of course I don't think that, I start, before I'm cut off again. "Liar!"
    The irony is that she claims to be above this kind of steamrolling. "The country is trapped in a political discourse that resembles professional wrestling," she has written. "Liberals are calling names while conservatives are trying to make arguments." But her view of what constitutes an argument seems to be a distinctly one-sided affair. I try again: "Do you think I have any point at all about..." I begin, but she interrupts again. "No!" She doesn't even know what my point was.
    • Sholto Byrnes, in "Ann Coulter: The blonde assassin" in The Independent (16 August 2004)
  • Is Ann Coulter a nutcase? If she is, she's one listened to and approved of by a frightening number of Americans. Surely, I say, hoping she will concede that she sometimes provokes to amuse, she doesn't believe everything she comes out with. "This is the shocking thing for your readers," she replies. "I believe everything I say."
    • Sholto Byrnes, in "Ann Coulter: The blonde assassin" in The Independent (16 August 2004)
  • I know a lot of the widows and family members who lost loved ones on 9/11. They never wanted to be a member of a group that is defined by the tragedy of what happened. I find it unimaginable that anyone in the public eye could launch a vicious, mean-spirited attack on people whom I’ve known over the last four and a half years to be concerned deeply about the safety and security of our country.
    Perhaps her book should have been called Heartless.
  • I think Ann Coulter is getting exactly what she wants, which is attention. … I think Ann Coulter often has intriguing and provocative things to say about the clash between liberalism and conservatism. I think some of the stuff she said here is over the line, and I have a pretty high tolerance for this kind of stuff because I believe that the more we argue, the better we are as a country, but I think some of the personal comments were just over the line.
    • Howard Fineman, as quoted in Soulless: Ann Coulter and the Right-Wing Church of Hate (2006) by Susan Estrich, p. 71
  • It's the ugliness of the charge that she is making, the ugliness of the words that she's using that are drawing attention to her… But it's almost as if she's a figure in a circus. And you're saying, "Oh, my God. Can you believe that?
    • David Gergen, as quoted in Soulless: Ann Coulter and the Right-Wing Church of Hate (2006) by Susan Estrich, p. 71
  • Ann Coulter has become a legend in her own mind.
    • Peter T. King, as quoted in Soulless: Ann Coulter and the Right-Wing Church of Hate (2006) by Susan Estrich, p. 71
  • Certain individuals continue to perpetuate negative stereotypes about Republicans. Especially Republican women. Who do I feel is the biggest culprit? Ann Coulter. I straight up don’t understand this woman or her popularity. I find her offensive, radical, insulting, and confusing all at the same time. But no matter how much you or I disagree with her, the cult that follows Coulter cannot be denied. She is a New York Times best-selling author and one of the most notable female members of the Republican Party. She was one of the headliners at the recent CPAC conference (but when your competition is a teenager who has a dream about the Republican Party and Stephen Baldwin, it’s not really saying that much).
    Coulter could be the poster woman for the most extreme side of the Republican Party. And in some ways I could be the poster woman for the opposite. I consider myself a progressive Republican, but here is what I don’t get about Coulter: Is she for real or not? Are some of her statements just gimmicks to gain publicity for her books or does she actually believe the things she says? Does she really believe all Jewish people should be “perfected” and become Christians? And what was she thinking when she said Hillary Clinton was more conservative than my father during the last election? If you truly have the GOP’s best interests at heart, how can you possibly justify telling an audience of millions that a Democrat would be a better leader than the Republican presidential candidate? (I asked Ann for comment on this column, including many of the above questions, but she did not answer my request.)
  • If Ann Coulter is trying to persuade people to her view, the personal attack is foolish …. I think this kind of stuff does conservatives more harm than good, because it basically reinforces what the left is trying to sell, that the right is mean, out of control, and whatever other adjectives you want to put in there.
    • Bill O'Reilly, as quoted in Soulless: Ann Coulter and the Right-Wing Church of Hate (2006) by Susan Estrich, p. 72


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