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Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Beloved Yellowstone wolf shot dead by hunters

Posted by on Dec. 13, 2012 at 2:25 PM
  • 34 Replies

"Stock Photo: Wolf In Yellowstone National Park" on Shutterstock: http://tinyurl.com/bjovlvk

 

A wolf beloved by visitors and tracked by scientists at Yellowstone national park has been shot dead by hunters, reigniting debate over the targeting of the animal.

The alpha female, known as 832F and described by wildlife enthusiasts as a “rock star” due to her popularity, was found dead on Thursday outside the park’s boundary in Wyoming, the New York Times reported Sunday.

Over the last few weeks, eight wolves that had been fitted with $4,000 GPS collars to help researchers track their movement have been killed. It has led to complaint by animal rights groups and calls for fresh limits to be put in place ahead of the inaugural wolf trapping season, due to come in on 15 December.


Naturalists at Yellowstone are said to be dismayed that so many of the wolves they are tracking have been shot dead by hunters. The animals are tagged in an effort to study their habits and population spread.

According to the New York Times, researchers at the park found 832F’s death especially distressing. The female wolf was one of Yellowstone’s most popular inhabitants with tourists.

“She is the most famous wolf in the world,” wildlife photographer Jimmy Jones told the newspaper. His picture of the animal appears in the current issue of American Scientist.

Gray wolves were taken off the endangered species list last year, after seeing population figures rebound since the mid-1990s, following their reintroduction to the Rockies.

At the end of 2011, there were at least 98 wolves in 10 packs – plus two loners – in Yellowstone, according to the park’s annual wolf project report. The park stretches across Montana, Idaho and Wyoming.

Hunting, which is legally sanctioned in the northern Rockies, has been defended as a legitimate way to reduce predators to livestock. But anti-hunt campaigners say population numbers are not large enough to support the practice and that the animals bring in tourists to the region.


The eight collared wolves killed were all shot outside of the park’s perimeter. Data from 832F’s collar suggests the wolf rarely ventured beyond the park and then only for brief periods.

Alongside hunting, concern is also turning to the effect of wolf trapping in the coming season. Shane Colton, commissioner of the Montana fish, wildlife and parks department, said closing some areas to trapping or setting strict quotas will be on the table during a meeting Monday.

“We don’t want to close any area off if we don’t have to. But if we keep losing collared wolves … management becomes difficult,” Colton said.

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2012/12/09/beloved-yellowstone-wolf-shot-dead-by-hunters/

by on Dec. 13, 2012 at 2:25 PM
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Replies (1-10):
cutestmom24
by Member on Dec. 13, 2012 at 2:29 PM
:(
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LuvmyAiden
by on Dec. 13, 2012 at 2:35 PM

I have no problem with hunting but I find trapping totally repugnant. It is a disgusting practice, period. As far as the wolves go, if the numbers are sufficient to hunt and population control is neccassery then fine. If numbers get low then stop issuing tags for them and disallow hunting of them for a while. Hunters(generally) only hunt what they can legally buy a tag for so don't villify the hunter, villify the office that says there are enough wolves to hunt. And I find it odd for an animal to be found dead if they were shot by a hunter. Hunters generally want their trophies and don't leave them laying there.

shannonnigans
by Platinum Member on Dec. 13, 2012 at 2:38 PM
1 mom liked this
I guess Ted Nugent went to Yellowstone...

This is so sad. And I don't get it. They just shot it and left it? What is the point of that? There is nothing here to indicate that the wolf was eating a rancher's livestock, and it's not like anyone eats wolf. They just shot it and took off, and destroyed something beautiful, a park favorite. I'm glad I don't get it.
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Raintree
by Ruby Member on Dec. 13, 2012 at 2:40 PM
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She was beautiful.

Hunting for fun and/or revenge. Always the sign of an evolved human being. Not.

dustinsmom1
by JENN on Dec. 13, 2012 at 2:41 PM
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 The animal in that picture is clearly a coyote.

tambrathegreat
by on Dec. 13, 2012 at 2:50 PM

It's fairly clear that it's a wolf.  Look at the shoulders, the face and the tail.  Coyotes are more gracile in the shoulders and the face is pointier.  Obviously you don't know your canids.

Quoting dustinsmom1:

 The animal in that picture is clearly a coyote.


dustinsmom1
by JENN on Dec. 13, 2012 at 2:54 PM
1 mom liked this

 I know canis lupus very well thank you, and that, is a coyote.

Quoting tambrathegreat:

It's fairly clear that it's a wolf.  Look at the shoulders, the face and the tail.  Coyotes are more gracile in the shoulders and the face is pointier.  Obviously you don't know your canids.

Quoting dustinsmom1:

 The animal in that picture is clearly a coyote.


 

dustinsmom1
by JENN on Dec. 13, 2012 at 2:58 PM
1 mom liked this

 Coyote

wolf

MamaHasWings
by New Member on Dec. 13, 2012 at 2:58 PM

I support hunting for population control of animals that are used for FOOD, such as deer and fowl. Outside of that I support shooting animals which threaten your own personal livestock or your family's well being. This wolf, and the other tracked wolfs that were killed, lived in a national park and were not a threat to anyone in that sense. These animals were deliberately targeted and killed! It's a damn shame. Don't these "hunters" have something better to do with their time besides slaughter scientific research animals?

Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Dec. 13, 2012 at 2:59 PM

I agree that the photograph in this article looks like a coyote.......

The article doesn't surprise me. I wonder if the hunter that shot her left her because of the collar or if she happened to wander far enough away from where the shot penetrated her.

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