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Another comparison of American ideology and non American ideology

Posted by on Dec. 18, 2012 at 6:24 PM
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1 mom liked this

Interesting.

http://www.npr.org/2012/12/18/167253336/in-france-free-birth-control-for-girls-at-age-15?utm_source=NPR&utm_medium=facebook&utm_campaign=20121218


In France, Free Birth Control For Girls At Age 15

An employee tidies boxes of medicines displayed in a pharmacy in the city of Caen in western France last month. Beginning in 2013, girls between the ages of 15 and 18 will be able to get birth control free of charge, and without parental notification.

Charly Triballeau/AFP/Getty Images

Beginning next year, young women in France between the ages of 15 and 18 will have access to birth control free of charge, and without parental notification. The French government says the new measure is intended to reduce pregnancies in this age group that result from a mixture of ignorance, taboo and lack of access to contraception.

One place where information is available on birth control, abortion and sexual abuse is a family planning clinic in a gritty neighborhood in the east of Paris.

On a recent day, a counselor talks with a handful of teenage girls in a sitting room. Clinic director Isabelle Louis says the young women who come to the clinic aren't necessarily poor; she says many hail from well-off families and live on the other side of Paris.

"It's not very easy for young women to go to see her family doctor and ask for contraception," Louis says. "A lot of them are afraid the doctor would tell the parents she came."

Starting in January, a law will protect these girls' anonymity at their family doctor's office, and the state will pick up the cost of the consultation and contraception. Under current rules, teenagers wanting absolute anonymity with a doctor have to pay for the visit in cash without submitting a claim to get the money back. And birth control is only partially reimbursed by the French state. Only clinics like this one are free.

The new law will also protect girls' anonymity at their family doctor's office. Under current rules, teenagers wanting absolute anonymity with a doctor have to pay for the visit in cash without submitting a claim to get reimbursed.

Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

French health officials say the new measure will help protect teenagers who are from low-income families, and from families where sexuality is a taboo subject.

Widespread Support For The Plan

Marie, a 17-year-old who doesn't want to give her last name, is visiting the clinic for the first time. She says she didn't know about the new law but thinks it's a good idea, and probably will see her family doctor next time — because she knows him and trusts him more, she says.

Marie is in her senior year at a very competitive Paris high school and says she cannot risk getting pregnant. But she comes from a very Catholic family, and says her parents wouldn't approve of her sexual activity.

"They don't want me to have sex with a lot of guys, because they think sex means love, too. So they want me to have a sexual activity with feelings," she says.

She says she actually feels the same.

"I do have sexual activity with my boyfriend because I love him," Marie says. "Yeah, I feel the same [as my parents]."

While birth control generated a vitriolic debate in the U.S. election campaign this year, the French government adopted the measure without a battle of any kind.

One Catholic organization did oppose it. CLER is a group that counsels young people about sexuality and relationships. A video on their website shows volunteers going into schools to talk to adolescents.

"We think reimbursing for contraception is a hygienist approach to sexuality, like the only thing that matters is health," says Jean Eude Tisson, president of CLER. "We think it goes beyond that."

Tisson says his group tries to explain that marriage brings the body and spirit together. He says the French government would do better to spend the money on more effective sex education in schools rather than on contraception.

Back at the clinic, 17-year-old Sabrina looks a bit nervous in the sitting room. It's her first time, too. But she didn't come for birth control.

"My father wants me to do a virginity test and get a virginity certificate. He says if I'm not a virgin he's gonna send me back to Morocco," she says.

Sabrina says she has not had sexual relations yet, but she doesn't think she'll wait until marriage either — despite her father's threat.

Counselors at the clinic say the new law may not solve every problem, but by giving young women like Sabrina other options for anonymous information, advice and free care, they believe it's a step in the right direction.


by on Dec. 18, 2012 at 6:24 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Momniscient
by Obama licker on Dec. 18, 2012 at 6:24 PM
1 mom liked this


While birth control generated a vitriolic debate in the U.S. election campaign this year, the French government adopted the measure without a battle of any kind.

12hellokitty
by Ruby Member on Dec. 18, 2012 at 6:36 PM

Interesting how the article notes the religious beliefs of Marie as being Catholic yet fails to note the religious views of Sabrina....

Momniscient
by Obama licker on Dec. 18, 2012 at 6:42 PM


Quoting 12hellokitty:

Interesting how the article notes the religious beliefs of Marie as being Catholic yet fails to note the religious views of Sabrina....

Interesting that this is what you focus on.

Why is that?

Marie wanted birth control.

Sabrina did not. She was getting a virginity check.


JCB911
by Bronze Member on Dec. 18, 2012 at 6:46 PM

Wouldn't it just be safer to pass out free condoms - then they'd be protecting against STDs as well.  Drugs, even BC pills have side effects and are not safe for everyone.I suppose if they are going to do this why not just do it at the schools - and better yet just give the girls that shot that lasts 3 months - that'd probably be more effective than BC pills, which a young girl might forget to take, or could be found by parents.

But I'm not a fan of the gov't handing out drugs - or putting their nose where it doesn't belong.  This is an issue between the child and the family - NOT the child and the gov't.  Kids are not informed enough about the consequences of sex, or the consequence/side effects of drugs.  There's a reason kids need parental consent for things- b/c they aren't mature enough to think past "I want to . . ."

Not sure what the last few paragraphs had to do with the story though - the Morocan/French girl.

CafeMom Tickers

12hellokitty
by Ruby Member on Dec. 18, 2012 at 6:54 PM


Quoting Momniscient:


Quoting 12hellokitty:

Interesting how the article notes the religious beliefs of Marie as being Catholic yet fails to note the religious views of Sabrina....

Interesting that this is what you focus on.

Why is that?

Marie wanted birth control.

Sabrina did not. She was getting a virginity check.

It didn't sound like the virginity check was by choice but to keep her from being sent back to Morocco. 
I see the article is from NPR so that explains it...

Momniscient
by Obama licker on Dec. 18, 2012 at 6:59 PM
Meaning?

Quoting 12hellokitty:



Quoting Momniscient:




Quoting 12hellokitty:


Interesting how the article notes the religious beliefs of Marie as being Catholic yet fails to note the religious views of Sabrina....


Interesting that this is what you focus on.


Why is that?


Marie wanted birth control.


Sabrina did not. She was getting a virginity check.


It didn't sound like the virginity check was by choice but to keep her from being sent back to Morocco. 
I see the article is from NPR so that explains it...

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Momniscient
by Obama licker on Dec. 18, 2012 at 6:59 PM
American ideology.

Quoting JCB911:

Wouldn't it just be safer to pass out free condoms - then they'd be protecting against STDs as well.  Drugs, even BC pills have side effects and are not safe for everyone.I suppose if they are going to do this why not just do it at the schools - and better yet just give the girls that shot that lasts 3 months - that'd probably be more effective than BC pills, which a young girl might forget to take, or could be found by parents.

But I'm not a fan of the gov't handing out drugs - or putting their nose where it doesn't belong.  This is an issue between the child and the family - NOT the child and the gov't.  Kids are not informed enough about the consequences of sex, or the consequence/side effects of drugs.  There's a reason kids need parental consent for things- b/c they aren't mature enough to think past "I want to . . ."

Not sure what the last few paragraphs had to do with the story though - the Morocan/French girl.

Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
JCB911
by Bronze Member on Dec. 18, 2012 at 9:51 PM
1 mom liked this

Absolutely - and proud of it.  The government needs to be a smaller part of our lives, not a bigger.


"A government big enough to give you everything you need, is a government big enough to take away everything that you have...."  Thomas Jefferson


In this case the gov't is big enough to give young girls birth control pills- and big enough to take away not only parental responsibility, but parental freedom. 

What if this was vaccines.  The French gov't declares vaccines can be given at school without parental notification.  So girls go and get that horrible HPV, go home and start having seziures - a parent wouldn't even be able to tell the Dr. why or what precipitated it. Or worse what if a parent knew their kid had an allergy to certain vaccines, or was simply against them for other reasons.  School nurse sees that Johnny (or Jean in France) hasn't had the flu shot yet and proceeds to give it to him, even though the parents know he always reacts poorly to it.   Birth control is a pretty serious drug, and to have a young girl take it, without parents knowing is scary.   What else will the French gov't deem necessary? 

It's a slippery slope I'm glad America hasn't gone down yet. 

Quoting Momniscient:

American ideology.

Quoting JCB911:

Wouldn't it just be safer to pass out free condoms - then they'd be protecting against STDs as well.  Drugs, even BC pills have side effects and are not safe for everyone.I suppose if they are going to do this why not just do it at the schools - and better yet just give the girls that shot that lasts 3 months - that'd probably be more effective than BC pills, which a young girl might forget to take, or could be found by parents.

But I'm not a fan of the gov't handing out drugs - or putting their nose where it doesn't belong.  This is an issue between the child and the family - NOT the child and the gov't.  Kids are not informed enough about the consequences of sex, or the consequence/side effects of drugs.  There's a reason kids need parental consent for things- b/c they aren't mature enough to think past "I want to . . ."

Not sure what the last few paragraphs had to do with the story though - the Morocan/French girl.


CafeMom Tickers

Momniscient
by Obama licker on Dec. 18, 2012 at 10:12 PM

Did France careen down your slippery slope?

Quoting JCB911:

Absolutely - and proud of it.  The government needs to be a smaller part of our lives, not a bigger.


"A government big enough to give you everything you need, is a government big enough to take away everything that you have...."  Thomas Jefferson


In this case the gov't is big enough to give young girls birth control pills- and big enough to take away not only parental responsibility, but parental freedom. 

What if this was vaccines.  The French gov't declares vaccines can be given at school without parental notification.  So girls go and get that horrible HPV, go home and start having seziures - a parent wouldn't even be able to tell the Dr. why or what precipitated it. Or worse what if a parent knew their kid had an allergy to certain vaccines, or was simply against them for other reasons.  School nurse sees that Johnny (or Jean in France) hasn't had the flu shot yet and proceeds to give it to him, even though the parents know he always reacts poorly to it.   Birth control is a pretty serious drug, and to have a young girl take it, without parents knowing is scary.   What else will the French gov't deem necessary? 

It's a slippery slope I'm glad America hasn't gone down yet. 

Quoting Momniscient:

American ideology.

Quoting JCB911:

Wouldn't it just be safer to pass out free condoms - then they'd be protecting against STDs as well.  Drugs, even BC pills have side effects and are not safe for everyone.I suppose if they are going to do this why not just do it at the schools - and better yet just give the girls that shot that lasts 3 months - that'd probably be more effective than BC pills, which a young girl might forget to take, or could be found by parents.

But I'm not a fan of the gov't handing out drugs - or putting their nose where it doesn't belong.  This is an issue between the child and the family - NOT the child and the gov't.  Kids are not informed enough about the consequences of sex, or the consequence/side effects of drugs.  There's a reason kids need parental consent for things- b/c they aren't mature enough to think past "I want to . . ."

Not sure what the last few paragraphs had to do with the story though - the Morocan/French girl.




futureshock
by Ruby Member on Dec. 18, 2012 at 10:21 PM

Yikes, that poor girl in for a virginity test.  There is no such thing.

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