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Half of single mothers 'do not want to work', says report

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Half of single mothers 'do not want to work', says report

Report: Government spending on persuading single mums into work is being wasted

UP to half of all single mothers do not want to work and simply will not take jobs, a report has found.

The analysis said Labour will never achieve its goal of persuading large numbers of lone parents to abandon a life on benefits because a huge proportion of them simply refuse to do so.

The study, produced by the Department for Work and Pensions, suggests much of the £3.4billion spent on attempts to encourage lone mothers to find jobs over the past ten years has been wasted.

It declared that Government campaigns 'struggle to make significant headway against the firm decision of some lone parents to choose not to work', and put this proportion at between 12 and 50 per cent.

Four out of ten lone mothers, the report added, say they do want to take jobs 'but only at some point in the future'.

New Labour's efforts to reduce poverty have centred on single parents since Tony Blair won the 1997 election.

As Chancellor, Gordon Brown devised the tax credits benefit system which currently pumps £16billion a year into the pockets of lower-paid working people and which is heavily biased towards helping single mothers.

Some £3.4billion has gone on the New Deal for Lone Parents, a welfare-to-work scheme meant to help single mothers into jobs.

However, recent figures showed that only around a fifth of those joining the New Deal find work that lasts more than a few weeks.

Mr Brown's target is to have 70 per cent of single parents in work.

However, this summer only 57.1 per cent were reported by Government surveys to be in employment.

The new analysis, carried out for the DWP by Andrew Thomas of Insite Research and Consulting, examined 'work focused interviews' which are a key part of the New Deal package.

Mothers must attend an interview if they wish to continue claiming the main benefit for the workless, income support.

The report said that although some mothers who are looking or willing to look for work derive some benefit from the interviews, most see going to one as a routine part of claiming benefits.

In spite of 'additional support premiums, incentives, transitional benefits, information on childcare and other elements that have been added piecemeal to the programme over the past five years,' the report found little progress had been made.

Interviews 'still appear to be unable to make significant headway against the firm decision of many to choose not to work'.

Ministers are understood to have discussed over the summer a system which would withdraw benefits from lone mothers who refuse to work.

The threat of withdrawing social security proved highly successful in the U.S. during the 1990s when used by President Bill Clinton.

But Mr Brown told the TUC conference earlier this month that the main change in Government policy would be to offer single parents even more incentives and extra benefits.

These will include £40 a week in taxpayer-subsidised pay - £60 a week in London - for the first year in work, £400 in training allowances, and a rule to allow single mothers to continue receiving state out-of-work benefits for their first six weeks in a job.

Critics of the system said that the DWP report was an admission that ten years of expensive Labour policies have failed.

Robert Whelan of the Civitas think tank said: "If people know they have the option of not working, they won't work. The only way is the Clinton way, in which you make it clear to people that they will lose their benefits if they don't work.

"In 1997 there was talk that the Government was going to do this as part of a wholesale reform of the welfare state. Instead what they have done is to produce the largest client group of the benefit-dependent in history."

by on Dec. 31, 2012 at 10:44 PM
Replies (41-50):
survivorinohio
by René on Jan. 1, 2013 at 10:49 AM

When I was a young mom with a worthless husband my mother wouldnt watch the kids or help me work in any way.  She said it was his job to provide for us and that my working would alleviate his responsibility and she wouldnt be party to it.

When I divorced she was more helpful but never really thought I should work. 


romalove
by Roma on Jan. 1, 2013 at 10:57 AM

If I was a single parent with a small child or baby, and I was helped enough that I could stay home, have a roof over my head, and feed my babies, but if I went to work someone else would be spending most of the day taking care of my kids and I might only get a few dollars more than by not working, I might say I don't want to work either.

Everyone has different priorities and experiences.  

candlegal
by Judy on Jan. 1, 2013 at 10:58 AM

Because it isn't the government that is providing, it is the taxpayers.  If they can't afford to be with their children during the early years without  the taxpayers paying for their children, they need to get to work.

  So it is okay for the people that pay taxes to have to work and leave their children with daycare so these single moms can stay home at the expense of taxpayers?

Quoting Teachandrun4:

I cannot say I am surprise who wants to go to work and leave their children for someone else to raise.  Most mothers want to be with their children during the early years.  This is a natural occurance.  Why should they work when the government is providing.


romalove
by Roma on Jan. 1, 2013 at 11:00 AM


Quoting survivorinohio:

When I was a young mom with a worthless husband my mother wouldnt watch the kids or help me work in any way.  She said it was his job to provide for us and that my working would alleviate his responsibility and she wouldnt be party to it.

When I divorced she was more helpful but never really thought I should work. 


We must have shared the same mother lol. 

Once, I was working part time and sharing my job with another woman.  I would watch her son when I was on duty, she would watch my daughter when I was on.  She called me one day at work to tell me her son had strep so I should come get my daughter.  I called my non-working, stay at home mother who lived six minutes away and asked her to pick up my daughter so I could finish my shift.  My mother's response was that she didn't approve of my working and that I should arrange to get my daughter myself and if I didn't I was a horrible mother.

I walked out of work and quit that day.  I've tried most of my life to work from home because I have had ZERO support for working outside the home.

harleigh07
by on Jan. 1, 2013 at 11:01 AM

Im a singel mom and I work my ass off! 

survivorinohio
by René on Jan. 1, 2013 at 11:09 AM


Quoting romalove:


Quoting survivorinohio:

When I was a young mom with a worthless husband my mother wouldnt watch the kids or help me work in any way.  She said it was his job to provide for us and that my working would alleviate his responsibility and she wouldnt be party to it.

When I divorced she was more helpful but never really thought I should work. 


We must have shared the same mother lol. 

Once, I was working part time and sharing my job with another woman.  I would watch her son when I was on duty, she would watch my daughter when I was on.  She called me one day at work to tell me her son had strep so I should come get my daughter.  I called my non-working, stay at home mother who lived six minutes away and asked her to pick up my daughter so I could finish my shift.  My mother's response was that she didn't approve of my working and that I should arrange to get my daughter myself and if I didn't I was a horrible mother.

I walked out of work and quit that day.  I've tried most of my life to work from home because I have had ZERO support for working outside the home.

LOL  It does sound like it huh.  Yes support for working moms isnt  real high in my family in general. 


How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


romalove
by Roma on Jan. 1, 2013 at 11:13 AM


Quoting survivorinohio:


Quoting romalove:


Quoting survivorinohio:

When I was a young mom with a worthless husband my mother wouldnt watch the kids or help me work in any way.  She said it was his job to provide for us and that my working would alleviate his responsibility and she wouldnt be party to it.

When I divorced she was more helpful but never really thought I should work. 


We must have shared the same mother lol. 

Once, I was working part time and sharing my job with another woman.  I would watch her son when I was on duty, she would watch my daughter when I was on.  She called me one day at work to tell me her son had strep so I should come get my daughter.  I called my non-working, stay at home mother who lived six minutes away and asked her to pick up my daughter so I could finish my shift.  My mother's response was that she didn't approve of my working and that I should arrange to get my daughter myself and if I didn't I was a horrible mother.

I walked out of work and quit that day.  I've tried most of my life to work from home because I have had ZERO support for working outside the home.

LOL  It does sound like it huh.  Yes support for working moms isnt  real high in my family in general. 


Even working from home as a mom has been difficult (but rewarding).

Because I was home, even if I was working, everyone considered me a SAHM, and I was the go-to mom for sick kids, vacations or days off, my kid is sick can you pick them up, they forgot their lunch can you run it there, etc.

No support or help when I needed it because it was in my head because I was at home.

I remember once, I was working from home for an online social site and doing an online celebrity chat, closing myself in my den (I have French doors that close it off) and I am supposed to work in silence.  My kids knew that but hubby "ran to the store" and the older kids were fighting, so while I was conducting this high level interview I could see out of the corner of my eye my two older kids running back and forth in the other room fighting with each other.  It was like a bad sitcom!

gammie
by on Jan. 1, 2013 at 11:19 AM
2 moms liked this

Are you two stupid? SAHM mothers are working, we wake up at work and go to sleep at work. We are the boss of our homes we decied  everything that goes on in that home, we make things happen and raise happy healthy kids.

Why work for little pay, have a man tell me what to do and have to pay for someone to watch my kids, clean my home and never have time for my kids?


Quoting Sisteract:

I agree- and a whole lot of them who are at home, probably should be working.

Quoting Venae:

Well no shit!  I bet as many married mothers don't want to work either, but they ain't got the government as they baby daddies!



FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Jan. 1, 2013 at 11:50 AM
3 moms liked this

The UK.

And..................

Goodness, some can't win.  I've read that single mothers should be home with their child as the child needs their parents there 24/7.  Then there are the bogus 'studies' such as this that determine single mothers are losers and refuse to work.

The shit just gets deeper and deeper.

survivorinohio
by René on Jan. 1, 2013 at 12:07 PM


Quoting romalove:


Quoting survivorinohio:


Quoting romalove:


Quoting survivorinohio:

When I was a young mom with a worthless husband my mother wouldnt watch the kids or help me work in any way.  She said it was his job to provide for us and that my working would alleviate his responsibility and she wouldnt be party to it.

When I divorced she was more helpful but never really thought I should work. 


We must have shared the same mother lol. 

Once, I was working part time and sharing my job with another woman.  I would watch her son when I was on duty, she would watch my daughter when I was on.  She called me one day at work to tell me her son had strep so I should come get my daughter.  I called my non-working, stay at home mother who lived six minutes away and asked her to pick up my daughter so I could finish my shift.  My mother's response was that she didn't approve of my working and that I should arrange to get my daughter myself and if I didn't I was a horrible mother.

I walked out of work and quit that day.  I've tried most of my life to work from home because I have had ZERO support for working outside the home.

LOL  It does sound like it huh.  Yes support for working moms isnt  real high in my family in general. 


Even working from home as a mom has been difficult (but rewarding).

Because I was home, even if I was working, everyone considered me a SAHM, and I was the go-to mom for sick kids, vacations or days off, my kid is sick can you pick them up, they forgot their lunch can you run it there, etc.

No support or help when I needed it because it was in my head because I was at home.

I remember once, I was working from home for an online social site and doing an online celebrity chat, closing myself in my den (I have French doors that close it off) and I am supposed to work in silence.  My kids knew that but hubby "ran to the store" and the older kids were fighting, so while I was conducting this high level interview I could see out of the corner of my eye my two older kids running back and forth in the other room fighting with each other.  It was like a bad sitcom!

I bet you didnt skip a beat. :)

I thought mine were the only kids that ran through the house fighting while I was working on something lol.

I do think working at home is an excellent solution but not all moms can manage that either. I think it takes someone extraordinary to pull it off, especially given the scenario you have shared ;-)  

I really think we need to come with solutions.  Cooperative working environments where children can accompany mom, flexible scheduling so that parents can pick up their kids from school etc.   

Cottage industry and entrepeneurship is an option for some but if we really want to bring self sufficiency to families, especially young and or single moms we need to create an environment where this fits and isnt associated with so many negative consequences. Like less money, outside influences on children etc.

How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


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