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Marriage Benefits Pregnant Women’s Health More Than Cohabitation, Suggests Study EDIT

Posted by on Jan. 3, 2013 at 12:10 AM
  • 41 Replies

Marriage Benefits Pregnant Women’s Health More Than Cohabitation, Suggests Study

Although it sounds kind of like a cautionary tale that a 1950s mom would tell her daughters ("If you get 'in trouble,' you better get married, or else you will exploooooooode!"), a new study in The American Journal of Public Health has determined that there needs to be more research into the health detriments and benefits of marriage vs. cohabitation when it comes to pregnant women and their partners.

The study examined three groups of over 6,000 women: cohabiting women, both married and nonmarried women living with a partner, and noncohabiters were single, divorced, or separated women and further categorized by duration of cohabitation. They were asked about three main psychosocial conditions: self-reported intimate partner violence, substance abuse, and postpartum depression among childbearing women. 20% of the cohabitating but unmarried women reported at least one of the three conditions; the figure rises to 35% in unmarried single mothers and 67% in women who had gotten divorced or separated the year before the child was born.

The odds of intimate partner violence, substance use, and postpartum depression were higher in unmarried women cohabiting for ≤2 years, versus married women living with a partner >5 years.

Marcelo Urquia, the lead researcher of the Canadian epidemiological study, said that there's not enough information yet to draw any firm conclusion on the benefit of marriage on maternal and child health, but it's worth looking into further.

'Do pregnant women benefit from marriage over cohabitation?' [Modern Medicine]

Image via bullet74/Shutterstock

http://jezebel.com/5971969/marriage-benefits-pregnant-womens-health-more-than-cohabitation-suggests-study?tag=pregnancy


Quote:

Do pregnant women benefit from marriage over cohabitation?

A cross-sectional nationwide Canadian epidemiological study suggests that marriage rather than cohabitation may have psychosocial benefits for pregnant women. Published in the American Journal of Public Health, the results point to a need for research on maternal and child health that distinguishes between married and unmarried cohabiting women.

The researchers analyzed data from the 2006-207 Canadian Maternity Experiences Survey, a sample of 6,421 childbearing women. Cohabiting women were married or nonmarried women living with a partner. Noncohabiters were single, divorced, or separated women and further categorized by duration of cohabitation (≤2, 3-5, or >5 years).

The objective was to examine the joint associations of marital status and cohabitation on self-reported intimate partner violence, substance abuse, and postpartum depression among childbearing women. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) were generated using logistic regression.

Odds of intimate partner violence, substance use, and postpartum depression were higher in unmarried women cohabiting for ≤2 years, versus married women living with a partner >5 years (adjusted OR [AOR] 4.64. 95% CI 2.85, 7.56; AOR 5.36, CI 3.06, 9.39; and AOR 1.87, 95% CI 1.25, 2.80, respectively). As duration of cohabitation increased, all of the risk estimates declined.

According to lead investigator Marcelo Urquia, 20% of women who were cohabitating but not married suffered from at least one of the three psychosocial conditions, and the figure rose to 35% for single women who had never married and 67% for those who separated or divorced in the year before birth. It was unclear, however, whether problems such as partner or substance abuse were the cause or result of separations.


by on Jan. 3, 2013 at 12:10 AM
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Replies (1-10):
futureshock
by Ruby Member on Jan. 3, 2013 at 12:10 AM

bump

radioheid
by Libertarian on Jan. 3, 2013 at 10:27 AM
3 moms liked this

 Why is there no figure for married women?

Secondly, I like the deliberate bias toward the married group: "greater than 5 years" vs. "less than 2 years". Of course you're going to get the results you want when you stack the odds to support your fore-drawn conclusion. Let's look at women married for less than two years. Or people who cohabitated for greater than 5 years.

Quoting futureshock:

 

 20% of the cohabitating but unmarried women reported at least one of the three conditions; the figure rises to 35% in unmarried single mothers and 67% in women who had gotten divorced or separated the year before the child was born.

The odds of intimate partner violence, substance use, and postpartum depression were higher in unmarried women cohabiting for ≤2 years, versus married women living with a partner >5 years.

 


 


"Roger that. Over."

R   A   D    I    O    H    E    I    D

furbabymum
by Gold Member on Jan. 3, 2013 at 11:21 AM

 I personally don't know how I could do it without my DH beside me. I was telling him that exact thing last night as I sat on the couch holding the nebulizer to my DS's mouth and my DH sat next to us with his CPAP mask on to encourage my DS to allow the mask to be placed on his face. It makes me sad really. My DS loves his father so much and my DH is such an awesome father. I can't imagine depriving my children of that. My life wouldn't have been the same without my dad. He taught me so much and gave so much love. Would I have lived without him, of course. It just wouldn't have been as good a life imo.

Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Jan. 3, 2013 at 11:24 AM
1 mom liked this

this part ays it all for me. MORE RESEARCH!

How about that? A study just to realize/state that more studies need to be done. LOL moment for me.

Quoting futureshock:

Marriage Benefits Pregnant Women’s Health More Than Cohabitation, Suggests Study

a new study in The American Journal of Public Health has determined that there needs to be more research into the health detriments and benefits of marriage vs. cohabitation when it comes to pregnant women and their partners.


LuLuThatsWho
by on Jan. 3, 2013 at 11:28 AM

That doesn't surprise me at all.

radioheid
by Libertarian on Jan. 3, 2013 at 11:32 AM
1 mom liked this

 My dad was a monster.

I don't think it is so much marriage or a father/step-father that stabilizes homes and children, but a strong male role model in general, someone who can give children (and women, for that matter) a healthy view of what a good man can be. This can be a male best friend who lives in the home or is at the home daily, an uncle, a grandfather, a boyfriend, or so on. If my dad had left and my uncle Earl had moved in, I think we all would have benefited much more, and had a healtheir view of what men are and should be. Not to mention Earl always had a job... 

Quoting furbabymum:

 I personally don't know how I could do it without my DH beside me. I was telling him that exact thing last night as I sat on the couch holding the nebulizer to my DS's mouth and my DH sat next to us with his CPAP mask on to encourage my DS to allow the mask to be placed on his face. It makes me sad really. My DS loves his father so much and my DH is such an awesome father. I can't imagine depriving my children of that. My life wouldn't have been the same without my dad. He taught me so much and gave so much love. Would I have lived without him, of course. It just wouldn't have been as good a life imo.

 


"Roger that. Over."

R   A   D    I    O    H    E    I    D

jlo1313
by Silver Member on Jan. 3, 2013 at 11:34 AM
2 moms liked this

Depression and anxiety is prevelant in women that are divorcing anyway, this study seems to state the obvious without giving any new information.  Sorry Future, your unmarried mom posts are getting really old and predictable.

lilbit53009
by on Jan. 3, 2013 at 11:34 AM

here we go again with you and the kids out of wed lock and cohabitation! lol


but if i read that right....as long as you've been cohabitating for over 2 years it doesn't matter. it only applies those cohabitating under 2 years vs those married over 5 years

furbabymum
by Gold Member on Jan. 3, 2013 at 11:37 AM

 Well of course there are crappy mothers and fathers everywhere. Sad fact. Not anything to be said about that. I know my grandfather was a child molester who molested his kids and grandkids. We'd have all been better off without him.

Quoting radioheid:

 My dad was a monster.

I don't think it is so much marriage or a father/step-father that stabilizes homes and children, but a strong male role model in general, someone who can give children (and women, for that matter) a healthy view of what a good man can be. This can be a male best friend who lives in the home or is at the home daily, an uncle, a grandfather, a boyfriend, or so on. If my dad had left and my uncle Earl had moved in, I think we all would have benefited much more, and had a healtheir view of what men are and should be. Not to mention Earl always had a job... 

Quoting furbabymum:

 I personally don't know how I could do it without my DH beside me. I was telling him that exact thing last night as I sat on the couch holding the nebulizer to my DS's mouth and my DH sat next to us with his CPAP mask on to encourage my DS to allow the mask to be placed on his face. It makes me sad really. My DS loves his father so much and my DH is such an awesome father. I can't imagine depriving my children of that. My life wouldn't have been the same without my dad. He taught me so much and gave so much love. Would I have lived without him, of course. It just wouldn't have been as good a life imo.

 

 

frogbender
by Captain Underpants on Jan. 3, 2013 at 11:49 AM

Isn't this study like saying that prayers help sick people get better, even if the sick person has no idea they are being prayed for? Completely unsubstantiated. Also, where are the figures for the married women with PPD? Or abuse? 

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