Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Town is first to ban sale of plastic water bottles

Posted by on Jan. 4, 2013 at 8:17 AM
  • 30 Replies

 Massachusetts town is first to ban sale of plastic water bottles

Violators of the landmark ban in Concord will be fined $50

    Below:

WHDH-TV
updated 1/3/2013 8:31:14 PM ET2013-01-04T01:31:14

CONCORD, Mass. - Concord is the first town in the nation where the sale of plastic water bottles is prohibited.

  1.  

A new year brings a controversial new law into effect in Concord: no one can sell single-serving plastic water bottles.

"I think Concord, you know, they have a good point about the plastic. I really do and I think other towns might follow," one woman said.

The new law is the talk of the town.

"I thought it was a joke a first but then didn't realize it was going to put in effect and then -- it's so stupid that we can't buy water, it's water, like come on," said Gabe Jackson.

The ban comes after an April town meeting vote that makes Concord the first in the nation to ban the sale of plastic water bottles.

"You don't want to be known for something that's really that bad and it's kind of dumb," said Camille Galejs.

Supporters say it will force people to use tap water and reduce the number of plastic bottles in landfills.

Some businesses have been against it from the beginning. They've been busy trying to clear their shelves of the bottles.

"Where I work we sell bottled water and we just bought like 20 more cases so it's just going to be kind of sitting there. We're going to have to get rid of it," said Jenny Fioretti.

At a Concord supermarket that cleared the shelves of the plastic bottles, they've set up a water dispenser where you can come with your container and fill up -- but some are already thinking about ways around the ban.

"Towns are close enough that people can walk two minutes and go get it from Acton or Bedford. It doesn't really help I don't think," Fioretti said.

Businesses are finding a way around the ban by selling 20-ounce plastic water bottles. The ban only covers 16 ounces or less.

If you violate the ban, you will be fined $50.

by on Jan. 4, 2013 at 8:17 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
IndigoOwl
by on Jan. 4, 2013 at 8:20 AM
1 mom liked this
I just came in to see which California town it was. Surprised I guessed wrong.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
radioheid
by Libertarian on Jan. 4, 2013 at 8:23 AM
2 moms liked this

 I just bought a bottle of water last night at the gym...and dropped it in *the recycling bin* after I was done with it. People don't recycle in Concord?


"Roger that. Over."

R   A   D    I    O    H    E    I    D

jaxTheMomm
by Platinum Member on Jan. 4, 2013 at 8:28 AM

I think there are 2 problems (and I can't back this up at the moment but will try later) - first is that it's not cheap to recycle them.  Second is that they aren't always recycled, not even from the bin - instead, they are packed up and "sold" to 3rd world countries for dumping.

Saw a video some time ago about this - mountains upon mountains of plastic water bottles, from the US, in Indian dumps. 

At that moment I stopped buying flats of water bottles and bought reusable metal and plastic water bottles.  We don't leave the house without a couple of full water bottles!

Quoting radioheid:

 I just bought a bottle of water last night at the gym...and dropped it in *the recycling bin* after I was done with it. People don't recycle in Concord?


jhslove
by Bronze Member on Jan. 4, 2013 at 8:34 AM

Recycling isn't as good a solution as people think it is. For one thing, a lot of what gets put in the recycling bin ends up in the landfill anyway, for a lot of different reasons. Also, recycling still takes energy and natural resources, and at the end of it most recycled items are still made into other "one and done" items that can be used only once before needing to be either thrown away or recycled again, which takes more resources to repeat the process. It really is better to keep things out of the waste stream in the first place, by using re-useable grocery bags/water bottles, etc. and buying in bulk, storing items in jars or Tupperware instead of plastic baggies, and so forth. I haven't bought a plastic water bottle since I saw the video "The Story of Bottled Water"--you can find it on YouTube if you're interested. I've been actively trying to keep as much out of the waste stream as possible--including recycling, which is still better than nothing--for about a year, and before long it just becomes habit.

I'm not sure that this law is the way to go, though. What about taxing single-use items and then providing a discount for using re-useable ones. Starbucks is starting this, actually, to cut down on the number of their cups that end up in the trash. They're going to start selling re-useable plastic coffee cups for $1, and then offering a discount on drinks that are purchased using the cups (actually, you already get a discount for re-useable cups there). Most grocery stores offer a discount for bringing your own bags. It seems silly to say "We're going to ban the sale of plastic water bottles but only 16 oz or fewer"--as the article points out, many people will just buy a 20 oz bottle, take a few sips and then throw the rest out, which results in wasted water as well.

Quoting radioheid:

 I just bought a bottle of water last night at the gym...and dropped it in *the recycling bin* after I was done with it. People don't recycle in Concord?


radioheid
by Libertarian on Jan. 4, 2013 at 8:38 AM

 Recycling = jobs. We have a recycling plant not far from where I live. Scrapping and recycling are both pretty big in my area. When I lived in California everyone had 3 trash cans---one for garbage, one for compost, and one for recyclables. I'm sure there are some places that just ship their plastic off to the middle of nowhere, but many areas do have reliable recycling programs.

Quoting jaxTheMomm:

I think there are 2 problems (and I can't back this up at the moment but will try later) - first is that it's not cheap to recycle them.  Second is that they aren't always recycled, not even from the bin - instead, they are packed up and "sold" to 3rd world countries for dumping.

Saw a video some time ago about this - mountains upon mountains of plastic water bottles, from the US, in Indian dumps. 

At that moment I stopped buying flats of water bottles and bought reusable metal and plastic water bottles.  We don't leave the house without a couple of full water bottles!

Quoting radioheid:

 I just bought a bottle of water last night at the gym...and dropped it in *the recycling bin* after I was done with it. People don't recycle in Concord?

 

 


"Roger that. Over."

R   A   D    I    O    H    E    I    D

CorpCityGrl
by Bronze Member on Jan. 4, 2013 at 8:39 AM

I think this law is kinda stupid and inconvenient.  People do not necessarily just leave their house with empty plastic bottles to refill with water.  What if you are just passing through and need a drink of water?  This law is not the way to go and is too extreme.

Woodbabe
by Woodie on Jan. 4, 2013 at 8:40 AM
3 moms liked this

Ban on JUST water bottles huh?

 Sexy If its unladylike, fattening or fun, I'm in!
  

talia-mom
by Gold Member on Jan. 4, 2013 at 8:43 AM

I think it is a silly ban, but at least this is on a local level.   People can change their town council and mayor if they want the ban removed.

afwifeandmommy3
by Bronze Member on Jan. 4, 2013 at 8:46 AM
That's plain stupid
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
ILive4This
by Bronze Member on Jan. 4, 2013 at 8:51 AM
1 mom liked this

Good!   My husband razzed me for getting a Zero Water filtration system, and stopping the purchase of bottled water.  I said, look around when you're out and about and notice the random littering of the damn things.  We took a walk down the trail a couple days later, and he started pointing out the bottles here and there.  He doesn't razz me anymore.  It's ridiculous. Plastic grocery bags should be next, except the oil lobby is so strong it's been proven hard to outlaw them.  Other countries have done it...but not here.  Watch the documentary Bag It sometime if you really want to be depressed about plastics.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)