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Judaism is a Race AND a Religion? (Sort of a S/O from the Catholic post)

Posted by on Jan. 7, 2013 at 3:33 PM
Jes
  • 62 Replies
Please explain Jewish Mama's....




And anyone else for that matter...

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by on Jan. 7, 2013 at 3:33 PM
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eema.gray
by on Jan. 7, 2013 at 3:36 PM

You're an ethnic Jew if you were born to Jewish parants (my kids are ethnically Jewish but I'm not because I converted, total weirdness there).

Judaism is also a religious practice and one that people convert into, like I did.

Being Jewish by ancestory is recognized on a genetic level because of Tay Sach's disease and a few others that are found nearly exclusively within people of Jewish/eastern european ancestory.


lizzielouaf
by Gold Member on Jan. 7, 2013 at 3:48 PM

I'm Jewish, I was born Jewish and my parents are Dutch European Jews that came over to America. When people bring this up, whether Jews are a race as opposed to religion only, my grandmother does not appreciate the topic in fact she gets very angry. She feels anyone saying Jews are a race opens Jews up to discrimination and brings back very difficult memories for her. Actually the Supreme Court recognizes Jews as a race and this was to protect Jews against discrimination. So legally, yes Jews are a race. Our rabbi, Reform Judaism, does not recognize Jews as a race but recognizes us as a religion and cultural family. 

I'm not being very articulate for some reason. Basically what I'm saying in a round about inarticulate way is Jews are not a race lol.

shannonnigans
by Platinum Member on Jan. 7, 2013 at 3:53 PM
Two Hispanics marry and for whatever reasons convert to Judaism. They have a child. Their child is Hispanic. That's what he would be when he filled out census bureau or any other questionnaire. And speaking of which, I have never seen anything of the sort which lists Caucasian, Asian, Hispanic, and Jew under "race."
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eema.gray
by on Jan. 7, 2013 at 3:56 PM

When I was in fertility treatment, one of the questions my husband and I were both asked is if either of us was ethnically Jewish.  That's exactly the way the question was phrased.  There are some diseases, Tay Sachs being the most well known that are nearly exclusively found amongst people of Jewish ancestory.  In fact, so strongly prevelent is Tay Sach a "Jewish disease" that if you're not from a Jewish family and birth a baby with one of these diseases, it's almost always found out later that one of the parents comes from a non practicing, genetically Jewish family.

ETA, for the record, it is more than plausible to be both ethnically hispanic and ethnically Jewish.  There's a decent size "native" Jewish population in Mexico; their families largely trace back to the spanish inquisition when many Jewish families fled to overseas spanish held colonies to escape persecution.

Quoting shannonnigans:

Two Hispanics marry and for whatever reasons convert to Judaism. They have a child. Their child is Hispanic. That's what he would be when he filled out census bureau or any other questionnaire. And speaking of which, I have never seen anything of the sort which lists Caucasian, Asian, Hispanic, and Jew under "race."


"I am only one, but I am still one; I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do." ~~ Edward Everett Hale 1822-1909
annabl1970
by Platinum Member on Jan. 7, 2013 at 4:04 PM
In Russia, Jewish was "nationality", "Judaism "- religion. I knew some Jewish who are Christans, and I know some Russians, who converted to Judaism.
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shannonnigans
by Platinum Member on Jan. 7, 2013 at 4:12 PM
And I'm well aware of Tay-Sachs, but I think that as people convert and inter-marry, the lines blur substantially. In my above example, nobody could with a straight face suggest that the child was anything other than Hispanic.

And though I may be mistaken, isn't Tay-Sachs limited to the Eastern European region, speaking in terms of ancestry? And by the way, I well could be.

One can infer, however, that for most purposes, it is not characterized as a race, given say census data, college or job apps, etc. Clearly it's subjective and open to interpretation.


Quoting eema.gray:

When I was in fertility treatment, one of the questions my husband and I were both asked is if either of us was ethnically Jewish.  That's exactly the way the question was phrased.  There are some diseases, Tay Sachs being the most well known that are nearly exclusively found amongst people of Jewish ancestory.  In fact, so strongly prevelent is Tay Sach a "Jewish disease" that if you're not from a Jewish family and birth a baby with one of these diseases, it's almost always found out later that one of the parents comes from a non practicing, genetically Jewish family.

ETA, for the record, it is more than plausible to be both ethnically hispanic and ethnically Jewish.  There's a decent size "native" Jewish population in Mexico; their families largely trace back to the spanish inquisition when many Jewish families fled to overseas spanish held colonies to escape persecution.


Quoting shannonnigans:

Two Hispanics marry and for whatever reasons convert to Judaism. They have a child. Their child is Hispanic. That's what he would be when he filled out census bureau or any other questionnaire. And speaking of which, I have never seen anything of the sort which lists Caucasian, Asian, Hispanic, and Jew under "race."



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lizzielouaf
by Gold Member on Jan. 7, 2013 at 4:15 PM

The reason they ask if you're Jewish in regards to Tay Sachs is because of a region of Jews that were genetically prone to the defective chromosome responsible for Tay Sachs.

Quoting eema.gray:

When I was in fertility treatment, one of the questions my husband and I were both asked is if either of us was ethnically Jewish.  That's exactly the way the question was phrased.  There are some diseases, Tay Sachs being the most well known that are nearly exclusively found amongst people of Jewish ancestory.  In fact, so strongly prevelent is Tay Sach a "Jewish disease" that if you're not from a Jewish family and birth a baby with one of these diseases, it's almost always found out later that one of the parents comes from a non practicing, genetically Jewish family.

ETA, for the record, it is more than plausible to be both ethnically hispanic and ethnically Jewish.  There's a decent size "native" Jewish population in Mexico; their families largely trace back to the spanish inquisition when many Jewish families fled to overseas spanish held colonies to escape persecution.

Quoting shannonnigans:

Two Hispanics marry and for whatever reasons convert to Judaism. They have a child. Their child is Hispanic. That's what he would be when he filled out census bureau or any other questionnaire. And speaking of which, I have never seen anything of the sort which lists Caucasian, Asian, Hispanic, and Jew under "race."



stacymomof2
by Ruby Member on Jan. 7, 2013 at 4:36 PM

I have heard this before as well...I guess there are both people who are ethnically Jewish and converted.

Mommy_of_Riley
by Jes on Jan. 7, 2013 at 4:38 PM
Thank you all for your input!
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SlingsAndThings
by Bronze Member on Jan. 7, 2013 at 4:38 PM

 There's such a thing as an ethnic Jew.  I was born Jewish technically and do to some genetic links to my ashkenazi hertiage, I really never really be able to get rid of that lable no matter what religion I am now.  I will always have to answer "yes" to are you of Eastern European Jewish heritage when I am pregnant due to certain things like Tay Sachs.  However, from my understanding tay-sachs and things are mostly limited to Ashkenazi but I could be way off.

I feel it can be more of an ethnicity than a race though.

Oh you who have believed, seek help through patience and prayer. Indeed, Allah is with those who are patient-


Al Quran 2-153


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