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http://www.wistv.com/story/20540533/myrtle-beach-makes-most-dangerous-places-to-live- Updated Violent crimes bolster Myrtle Beach's 'Most Dangerous Places' rank By Jessica Cinardo



MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WMBF) - We're only two weeks into 2013 and the Grand Strand has already experienced a large number of homicides, robberies and other serious crimes.



These unfavorable crimes have placed Myrtle Beach on the list of the "Top 100 Most Dangerous Cities in the U.S." on Location Inc.'s neighborhoodscout.com.



"With a crime rate of 167 per one thousand residents, Myrtle Beach has one of the highest crime rates in America compared to all communities of all sizes- from the smallest towns to the very largest cities," NeighborhoodScout explains.



Myrtle Beach comes in at number 21 on the list of the most dangerous cities. While Atlanta, Baltimore, Cleveland, Chicago and Paterson fall much higher on the list.



"When I drive up here in the mornings, I just hope I'm not going to be broken into," said Deborah Watson. Watson owns Headz and Toez, a hair salon next to Pizza Shak, which was robbed early Wednesday morning.



"You cannot jurisdict the morals of what's right or wrong!" she said.



Out of a crime index with 100 being the safest, Myrtle Beach holds a 0, making it safer than 0 percent of other U.S. cities. Even more alarming is NeighborhoodScout's statistic that while living in Myrtle Beach there is a 1 in 7 chance that you will become a victim of a property crime such as burglary or motor vehicle theft.



"With a population of 27,820, Myrtle Beach has a combined rate of violent and property crime that is very high compared to other places similar in population size," the location-based data site notes.



But some people suspect the crime statistics in Myrtle Beach are inflated because of the high number of tourists that visit during warmer months.



"That study doesn't take into account all the motels and people that fill up Myrtle Beach," said frequent visitor Phil Brown.



Before placing cities on the "Top 100 Most Dangerous Cities in the U.S." list, NeighborhoodScout compiles crime reports from all agencies in the city, revealing which cities have the highest rates of violent crime. After determining the total number of crimes reported they divide them by the population of the city, divided by 1,000 to establish a violent crime rate per 1,000 population.



Since NeighborhoodScout looks at the number of crimes per 1,000 residents they divided Myrtle Beach's population of 27,820 by 1,000 to get 27.82. The total number of crimes reported in the city, 4,633, is then divided by 27.82, revealing 166.54 annual crimes per 1,000 Myrtle Beach residents.



The crimes NeighborhoodScout looks for when compiling this data include forcible rape, murder and non-negligent manslaughter, armed robbery, aggravated assault, assault with a deadly weapon, burglary, larceny over $50, motor vehicle theft and arson.



Myrtle Beach isn't new to this top 100 list. In 2012, Myrtle Beach was ranked number 15 on the infamous list.



The website also outlines some of the safer areas of Myrtle Beach. Carolina Forest, Hwy. 17 in the Coventry area, Queensway Boulevard, Holmestown Road, Jaluco, Hwy. 17 and Glenns Bay Road, Route 814 and Hwy. 544, the area of Moorland Drive and Legends Road and Socastee as well as Hwy. 17 and Jason Boulevard are all listed as the safest neighborhoods in Myrtle Beach.





I'm having to giggle. We should be so safe, the guns are ever present









Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
by on Jan. 10, 2013 at 9:33 PM
Replies (11-20):
caito
by Silver Member on Jan. 11, 2013 at 7:54 PM
I've vacationed in Myrtle Beach a million times. I always felt safe in the daytime, but at night the strip is terrifying. Drinking, drugs, sex...it's not where you want to be at night.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
AdrianneHill
by Platinum Member on Jan. 11, 2013 at 8:22 PM
Since I grew up there I realize my replies on the subject will likely be leaning one way or another when dealing with my home and state but, I don't have a reply to any of that comment that would be complete without mentioning the racism, snobbery, and downright dismissive attitude inherent in your few short sentences in that post.

Quoting darlingdaisy:

 Its a black vatacation destination spot.  High concentrations, high crime.


http://www.blackbikeweek.us/


http://www.blackatlas.com/content/myrtle-beach


http://www.soulofamerica.com/myrtle-beach-black-genesis.phtml

Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
lga1965
by on Jan. 12, 2013 at 9:57 AM
1 mom liked this

 I wonder how North Myrtle Beach ranks? We have taken many vacations with the kids and grandkids, stayed at resorts in North Myrtle Beach,and it seemed really nice and quiet. We did notice when we shopped that Myrtle Beach was more crowded and the average person walking around looked kind of sleazy though.

Quoting AdrianneHill:

That's so hilarious. My friend from the beach and I were just talking about how people should start vacationing in Detroit for safety's sake. That's funny.

But the locals are crazy as hell on a good day. And the vacationers are either feral or dangerously shitfaced on something.


Quoting UpSheRises:

It can't be that dangerous if people vacation there.

Whens the last time you heard someone was taking a vacation to Detroit?

 







"I've long known rage was a life saver. I learned it from my mentor Rush Limbaugh, because every time you look at him you gotta ask, 'How is he still alive?'" -- Stephen Colbert
lga1965
by on Jan. 12, 2013 at 10:01 AM
1 mom liked this

 I wouldn't be able to live somewhere that featured gun shots ,even in a really nice neighborhood. I would be in a constant state of panic. WHat a sad way to live.

Quoting NWP:

I found this to be true as well when I lived in DFW during the 90's. There was a terrible crime rate and you just had to assume that more folks there were packing heat than not, it being Texas and all. We heard gunshots in the neighborhood every single day. And we lived blocks from Highland Park, one of the most exclusive neighborhoods in the country.

Quoting AdrianneHill:

Everyone is armed. It doesn't make life safer for everyone it seems. It just seems to make life easier on those always packing heat, but it doesn't seem to make crime go away like pro gun advocates insist.

Quoting stormcris:

I would not have thought such. Yet, on the gun comment...

MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WMBF) – Debates in Washington on gun control focus on keeping citizens from falling victim to gun violence, but in Myrtle Beach one lady who prevented a crime using her firearm says law-abiding citizens fall through the cracks of gun legislation.

"I was keeping him away from the Soles," said Melanie Moore, who prevented a car theft when she held a man and woman at gun point back in June.

"By taking [the man] out of the equation and letting [her neighbors] deal with his wife, I think things went a lot better," she said.

There have been two other notable cases where would-be victims stood their ground against their attackers in Horry County. One back in 2010 saw a man in Conway fend off three attackers, shooting one in the process. Another Conway man used his firearm to stop an attacker with a machete back in August. (source)


 







"I've long known rage was a life saver. I learned it from my mentor Rush Limbaugh, because every time you look at him you gotta ask, 'How is he still alive?'" -- Stephen Colbert
darlingdaisy
by on Jan. 12, 2013 at 10:37 AM

So you know that most of Myrtle Beach  doesn't want black bike week there at all.  The event is not welcomed because of the crime.

Quoting AdrianneHill:

Since I grew up there I realize my replies on the subject will likely be leaning one way or another when dealing with my home and state but, I don't have a reply to any of that comment that would be complete without mentioning the racism, snobbery, and downright dismissive attitude inherent in your few short sentences in that post.

Quoting darlingdaisy:

 Its a black vatacation destination spot.  High concentrations, high crime.


http://www.blackbikeweek.us/


http://www.blackatlas.com/content/myrtle-beach


http://www.soulofamerica.com/myrtle-beach-black-genesis.phtml

 

NWP
by guerrilla girl on Jan. 12, 2013 at 10:38 AM
1 mom liked this
We lived in a duplex. One night our neighbor fell asleep watching TV on his couch. We heard a very close gunshot that night. The next morning, he noticed a hole in his front door. A stray bullet had come through the front door and lodged in the wall right above his couche where he was sleeping! Yes..we eventually moved and Yes, living there helped form my opinion that MORE guns do not make your neighborhood safer.
Quoting lga1965:

 I wouldn't be able to live somewhere that featured gun shots ,even in a really nice neighborhood. I would be in a constant state of panic. WHat a sad way to live.

Quoting NWP:

I found this to be true as well when I lived in DFW during the 90's. There was a terrible crime rate and you just had to assume that more folks there were packing heat than not, it being Texas and all. We heard gunshots in the neighborhood every single day. And we lived blocks from Highland Park, one of the most exclusive neighborhoods in the country.

Quoting AdrianneHill:

Everyone is armed. It doesn't make life safer for everyone it seems. It just seems to make life easier on those always packing heat, but it doesn't seem to make crime go away like pro gun advocates insist.

Quoting stormcris:

I would not have thought such. Yet, on the gun comment...

MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WMBF) – Debates in Washington on gun control focus on keeping citizens from falling victim to gun violence, but in Myrtle Beach one lady who prevented a crime using her firearm says law-abiding citizens fall through the cracks of gun legislation.

"I was keeping him away from the Soles," said Melanie Moore, who prevented a car theft when she held a man and woman at gun point back in June.

"By taking [the man] out of the equation and letting [her neighbors] deal with his wife, I think things went a lot better," she said.

There have been two other notable cases where would-be victims stood their ground against their attackers in Horry County. One back in 2010 saw a man in Conway fend off three attackers, shooting one in the process. Another Conway man used his firearm to stop an attacker with a machete back in August. (source)


 

Naughty Wittle Puppy

lga1965
by on Jan. 12, 2013 at 10:43 AM

 Oh my....I am glad you moved!

Quoting NWP:

We lived in a duplex. One night our neighbor fell asleep watching TV on his couch. We heard a very close gunshot that night. The next morning, he noticed a hole in his front door. A stray bullet had come through the front door and lodged in the wall right above his couche where he was sleeping! Yes..we eventually moved and Yes, living there helped form my opinion that MORE guns do not make your neighborhood safer.
Quoting lga1965:

 I wouldn't be able to live somewhere that featured gun shots ,even in a really nice neighborhood. I would be in a constant state of panic. WHat a sad way to live.

Quoting NWP:

I found this to be true as well when I lived in DFW during the 90's. There was a terrible crime rate and you just had to assume that more folks there were packing heat than not, it being Texas and all. We heard gunshots in the neighborhood every single day. And we lived blocks from Highland Park, one of the most exclusive neighborhoods in the country.

Quoting AdrianneHill:

Everyone is armed. It doesn't make life safer for everyone it seems. It just seems to make life easier on those always packing heat, but it doesn't seem to make crime go away like pro gun advocates insist.

Quoting stormcris:

I would not have thought such. Yet, on the gun comment...

MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WMBF) – Debates in Washington on gun control focus on keeping citizens from falling victim to gun violence, but in Myrtle Beach one lady who prevented a crime using her firearm says law-abiding citizens fall through the cracks of gun legislation.

"I was keeping him away from the Soles," said Melanie Moore, who prevented a car theft when she held a man and woman at gun point back in June.

"By taking [the man] out of the equation and letting [her neighbors] deal with his wife, I think things went a lot better," she said.

There have been two other notable cases where would-be victims stood their ground against their attackers in Horry County. One back in 2010 saw a man in Conway fend off three attackers, shooting one in the process. Another Conway man used his firearm to stop an attacker with a machete back in August. (source)


 

 







"I've long known rage was a life saver. I learned it from my mentor Rush Limbaugh, because every time you look at him you gotta ask, 'How is he still alive?'" -- Stephen Colbert
NWP
by guerrilla girl on Jan. 12, 2013 at 10:47 AM

Yes...I felt a LOT safer when I lived in Washington Heights, NYC.

Quoting lga1965:

 Oh my....I am glad you moved!

Quoting NWP:

We lived in a duplex. One night our neighbor fell asleep watching TV on his couch. We heard a very close gunshot that night. The next morning, he noticed a hole in his front door. A stray bullet had come through the front door and lodged in the wall right above his couche where he was sleeping! Yes..we eventually moved and Yes, living there helped form my opinion that MORE guns do not make your neighborhood safer.
Quoting lga1965:

 I wouldn't be able to live somewhere that featured gun shots ,even in a really nice neighborhood. I would be in a constant state of panic. WHat a sad way to live.

Quoting NWP:

I found this to be true as well when I lived in DFW during the 90's. There was a terrible crime rate and you just had to assume that more folks there were packing heat than not, it being Texas and all. We heard gunshots in the neighborhood every single day. And we lived blocks from Highland Park, one of the most exclusive neighborhoods in the country.

Quoting AdrianneHill:

Everyone is armed. It doesn't make life safer for everyone it seems. It just seems to make life easier on those always packing heat, but it doesn't seem to make crime go away like pro gun advocates insist.

Quoting stormcris:

I would not have thought such. Yet, on the gun comment...

MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WMBF) – Debates in Washington on gun control focus on keeping citizens from falling victim to gun violence, but in Myrtle Beach one lady who prevented a crime using her firearm says law-abiding citizens fall through the cracks of gun legislation.

"I was keeping him away from the Soles," said Melanie Moore, who prevented a car theft when she held a man and woman at gun point back in June.

"By taking [the man] out of the equation and letting [her neighbors] deal with his wife, I think things went a lot better," she said.

There have been two other notable cases where would-be victims stood their ground against their attackers in Horry County. One back in 2010 saw a man in Conway fend off three attackers, shooting one in the process. Another Conway man used his firearm to stop an attacker with a machete back in August. (source)


 

 


Naughty Wittle Puppy

AdrianneHill
by Platinum Member on Jan. 12, 2013 at 1:51 PM
Well I know that lots of locals hate black bike weekend every memorial day. Dozens of businesses simply shut down the day the white bikers leave and stay closed for ten days. A lot of locals hate white bike week just as much.
When money was good and they had the money to forget they were just a trashy vacation spot, the city voted to bam both of them. White and black. The economy tanked within three years so the laws were revoked quick. Unfortunately, many businesses closed down because those two weeks are when they make note only crazy profits but they make their taxes, rent, and utilities for the next eight months in that quick thirteen days.
Just saying that the locals want it to stop doesn't mean much because the locals don't want to be myrtle beach anymore. They want to get rid of the bikers and act like they are as old and sophisticated as Charleston instead of the type of town where the Jewish temples are covered in blue neon stars ofDavid all year long. And that's the classy places.


Quoting AdrianneHill:

Since I grew up there I realize my replies on the subject will likely be leaning one way or another when dealing with my home and state but, I don't have a reply to any of that comment that would be complete without mentioning the racism, snobbery, and downright dismissive attitude inherent in your few short sentences in that post.



Quoting darlingdaisy:

 Its a black vatacation destination spot.  High concentrations, high crime.



http://www.blackbikeweek.us/



http://www.blackatlas.com/content/myrtle-beach



http://www.soulofamerica.com/myrtle-beach-black-genesis.phtml

Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Jan. 12, 2013 at 1:59 PM


Quoting NWP:

I found this to be true as well when I lived in DFW during the 90's. There was a terrible crime rate and you just had to assume that more folks there were packing heat than not, it being Texas and all. We heard gunshots in the neighborhood every single day. And we lived blocks from Highland Park, one of the most exclusive neighborhoods in the country.

Quoting AdrianneHill:

Everyone is armed. It doesn't make life safer for everyone it seems. It just seems to make life easier on those always packing heat, but it doesn't seem to make crime go away like pro gun advocates insist.

Quoting stormcris:

I would not have thought such. Yet, on the gun comment...

MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WMBF) – Debates in Washington on gun control focus on keeping citizens from falling victim to gun violence, but in Myrtle Beach one lady who prevented a crime using her firearm says law-abiding citizens fall through the cracks of gun legislation.

"I was keeping him away from the Soles," said Melanie Moore, who prevented a car theft when she held a man and woman at gun point back in June.

"By taking [the man] out of the equation and letting [her neighbors] deal with his wife, I think things went a lot better," she said.

There have been two other notable cases where would-be victims stood their ground against their attackers in Horry County. One back in 2010 saw a man in Conway fend off three attackers, shooting one in the process. Another Conway man used his firearm to stop an attacker with a machete back in August. (source)


I lived in Dallas from 93-96 and it made me hate Texas and it's residents as a whole

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