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Whole Foods: Sorry For Telling Autistic Shopper To Wear A Leash

Posted by on Jan. 12, 2013 at 12:12 PM
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1 mom liked this

Whole Foods Apologizes For Telling Autistic Customer To Wear A Leash After Change.org Petition Circulates (VIDEO)

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Whole Foods: Sorry For Telling Autistic Shopper To Wear A Leash

Whole Foods Autistic Customer_jpeg
After a security guard at a Whole Foods in Milwaukee told Emily Goldman to put her autistic brother on a leash, the advocate launched a Change.org petition, which encouraged the story to apologize.

After a security guard at Whole Foods shamed her autistic brother, Emily Goldman took to the Internet to get the store to apologize and to change their staff training policies.

Earlier this month, Goldman’s brother, Michael –- who doesn’t speak –- took some food from the hot bar as the two shopped at a Whole Foods in Milwaukee, FOX6 reports. Goldman told the news outlet that she immediately apologized to the security guard on the scene, explained her brother’s condition and offered to pay for the grub. But she said she was met with an infuriating response.

“They told me he needed to get out of the store and not come back unless he was on a leash,” Goldman told FOX6.

Outraged by the exchange, Goldman launched a petition on Change.org, “Whole Foods: Stop treating adults with autism like they are animals,” which asked the chain to live up to its mission to serve as an “inclusive” store that treats all customers with “courtesy and respect.”

The petition, which has already garnered more than 1,000 signatures, encouraged Whole Foods to apologize and to set up a training session for the staff at the Milwaukee store with a local autism society, Goldman wrote on Change.org. The security guard who made the inflammatory comment has resigned, according to FOX6.

“I am thrilled by this pledge to provide quality training locally, but I want to ensure that it occurs,” Goldman wrote on Change.org, “and I think that preventative training is needed in other stores so that everyone who works in Whole Foods is prepared to treat people with disabilities with courtesy and respect.”

by on Jan. 12, 2013 at 12:12 PM
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Replies (1-10):
futureshock
by Ruby Member on Jan. 12, 2013 at 12:13 PM

Are parents who leash their children treating those children like animals?

blues_pagan
by on Jan. 12, 2013 at 12:15 PM
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We have a neurotypical DD and we won't put her on a leash.  A leash is for an animal not a person, regardless of the condition that person may have.

Paperfishies
by Silver Member on Jan. 12, 2013 at 12:19 PM
1 mom liked this
I agree. We've never leashed either of my kids and I hve a neuro typical 9 year old and a 2 year old who is on the spectrum and is a runner.


Quoting blues_pagan:

We have a neurotypical DD and we won't put her on a leash.  A leash is for an animal not a person, regardless of the condition that person may have.


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blues_pagan
by on Jan. 12, 2013 at 12:19 PM
1 mom liked this

There is no need to do that.  It teaches the child nothing.  Instead it almost tells the child that animal like behavior is fine since you are treating them like one.

Quoting Paperfishies:

I agree. We've never leashed either of my kids and I hve a neuro typical 9 year old and a 2 year old who is on the spectrum and is a runner.


Quoting blues_pagan:

We have a neurotypical DD and we won't put her on a leash.  A leash is for an animal not a person, regardless of the condition that person may have.



OneToughMami
by on Jan. 12, 2013 at 12:29 PM
1 mom liked this

I wish more people would speak out for the neurotypical kiddos who are leashed.

free1
by ~FreeSpirit~ on Jan. 12, 2013 at 12:41 PM

 “They told me he needed to get out of the store and not come back unless he was on a leash." Insensitive, inappropriate, no, or little training about autistic behavior(s).

The security guard who made the inflammatory comment has resigned...

Whaaaaaa....O.o
by on Jan. 12, 2013 at 2:17 PM
3 moms liked this
I put my kids on leashes because it gave them a sense of independence while at the same time kept them safe. In no way were they treated like animals.

And putting an 18-24 month old child on it is completely different than telling someone who is an adult with special needs they need to be on one m
krysstizzle
by DeepThought on Jan. 12, 2013 at 3:09 PM
1 mom liked this
Putting people on leashes just seems absurd to me, on so many levels.
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Mommy_of_Riley
by Jes on Jan. 12, 2013 at 3:13 PM
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In my opinion yea.

Quoting futureshock:

Are parents who leash their children treating those children like animals?

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Bookwormy
by Platinum Member on Jan. 12, 2013 at 3:20 PM
I've always been very uncomfortable with child leashes. I try not to judge others who use them, whether with their children who are healthy or disabled. However, I do know that my father was leashed & tied to the porch by my great-grandmother and I find that damaging & abusive. No one I know now would ever do that. We have never used a leash with our 6yo DD, who doesn't have an autism spectrum disorder. I can't say that she is neurotypical because she has epilepsy, but it is an invisable disability.
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