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Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Purina Jerky Treats Made in China Recalled Over Antibiotics

Posted by on Jan. 14, 2013 at 3:06 PM
  • 10 Replies

By DogsterJan 14th 2013Chicken jerky treats made in China are finally being recalled, but not for the reason you might think. Products of two brands are being pulled from store shelves: Nestle Purina PetCare Co.'s Waggin' Train and Canyon Creek Ranch brand dog treats, and Milo's Kitchen's Chicken Jerky and Chicken Grillers home-style dog treats.

They're being pulled because they might contain traces of poultry antibiotics that aren't approved in the U.S. On Wednesday, the companies said the chicken jerky products contain "minute amounts of antibiotic residue," according to the AP. The antibiotics are not necessarily bad for dogs. They've been approved for use in China and the European Union by regulators, but not in the U.S.


The antibiotics include sulfaclozine, tilmicosin, trimethoprim, enrofloxacin, and sulfaquinoxaline, according to NBC News.

The New York State Department of Agriculture detected the antibiotics in samples they tested, using a "new, particularly sensitive test." Joe Morrissey, a department spokesman, said the agency is testing jerky treats because of "growing consumer concerns."

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A spokesman for St. Louis-based Nestle Purina, Keith Schopp, was clear that this recall is a separate issue from the ongoing jerky treat mystery, in which Chinese-made jerky pet treats are suspected of sickening thousands of animals since 2007 and killing hundreds of them.

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"There is no indication that the trace amounts of antibiotic residue is related to FDA's ongoing investigation," Schopp told NBC News. "Due to regulatory inconsistencies among countries, the presence of antibiotic residue is technically considered an adulteration in the United States."

Even the FDA states that the antibiotics "do not raise health concerns" and that they are "highly unlikely to be related to the reports of illnesses FDA has received related to jerky pet treats."

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As for the ongoing investigation of jerky treats from China, the FDA has been unable to find a precise cause for the reported illnesses. But the agency says it's taking the issue seriously and has put up a page on its site warning consumers about them and offering tips for their proper use, such as: "Do not substitute chicken jerky products for a balanced diet. The products are intended to be used occasionally and in small quantities. Owners of small dogs must be especially careful to limit the amount of these products."

A better strategy would be to forgo them.

Consumers with questions about Milo's Kitchen products can get further information at (877) 228-6493. Consumers with questions about Purina's Wagging Train products can call (800) 982-0704 or go to www.waggintrainbrand.com

by on Jan. 14, 2013 at 3:06 PM
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Replies (1-10):
happinessforyou
by Bronze Member on Jan. 14, 2013 at 3:07 PM
2 moms liked this

Never feed your pets anything "Made In China".

annabl1970
by Platinum Member on Jan. 14, 2013 at 3:08 PM

YEP!

Quoting happinessforyou:

Never feed your pets anything "Made In China".


LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Jan. 14, 2013 at 3:34 PM
1 mom liked this

Well, that's excellent.

Save the dogs.

annabl1970
by Platinum Member on Jan. 14, 2013 at 6:24 PM
My aunt's dog had horrible diarrhea and vomiting after the eating purina chicken jerky.


Quoting LindaClement:

Well, that's excellent.

Save the dogs.


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Sekirei
by Nari Trickster on Jan. 14, 2013 at 6:27 PM
1 mom liked this

This is why I do not buy my dogs that shit.. any of it. 

they get organic and holistic food..Purina is nothing more than crap

annabl1970
by Platinum Member on Jan. 14, 2013 at 6:29 PM
1 mom liked this
I still feel guilty because I bought them for her dog from Costco:(


Quoting LindaClement:

Well, that's excellent.

Save the dogs.


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Jan. 14, 2013 at 7:10 PM
1 mom liked this

Unlikely to be related to trace amounts of antibiotics (given the vast quantities in regular market chicken in the US...)

Quoting annabl1970:

My aunt's dog had horrible diarrhea and vomiting after the eating purina chicken jerky.


Quoting LindaClement:

Well, that's excellent.

Save the dogs.



annabl1970
by Platinum Member on Jan. 14, 2013 at 7:22 PM

Chinese Pet Treats Linked to 900 Dog Deaths, Illnesses CINDY GALLI
May 23, 2012

 

 

Just six months after issuing its latest warning about chicken jerky dog treats made in China, the Food and Drug Administration confirms it has logged more than 900 complaints from pet owners who say their dogs either were sickened or died after eating the treats.

The number of complaints has nearly doubled since the story was first reported by ABC News in March. The FDA says its investigation is ongoing and that it continues to test samples of the popular treats, which dog owners across the country say have caused kidney failure in their pets, resulting in severe illness or death.

PHOTOS of dogs who allegedly died after eating Chinese jerky treats.

Consumers have largely blamed two brands for the reported illnesses. Waggin' Train and Canyon Creek Ranch, both produced by Nestle Purina and made in China, are reportedly included in the samples being tested by the FDA. The agency told ABC News it has solicited samples of treats from the owners of the pets allegedly affected, but will not say whether it is tested those samples. To date, the FDA has not been able to determine a cause for the reported illnesses.

The FDA issued its first warning about chicken jerky treats from China in 2007 and again in 2008, both times based on consumer complaints. But it wasn't until a third warning -- in late 2011 -- that the momentum of complaints accelerated as an angry population of pet owners demanded to know what in the Chinese treats might be sickening their dogs.

"It's hard to believe that we're still fighting the same battle," said Terry Safranek, whose 9-year old Fox Terrier named Sampson died of kidney failure in January.

Courtesy Terry Safranek
Sampson, a 9-year-old fox terrier, died of... View Full Size
PHOTO: Sampson, a 9-year-old fox terrier, died of kidney failure in January. His owners blame his death on Chinese jerky treats.
Courtesy Terry Safranek
Sampson, a 9-year-old fox terrier, died of kidney failure in January. His owners blame his death on Chinese jerky treats.

"The last thing that he ate and then threw up was the chicken jerky," said Safranek. "It kills me that the treats I fed him killed him."

Safranek is a member of a Facebook group called "Animal Parents Against Pet Treats Made In China," which has grown to 4,500 members and includes hundreds of photos of dogs whose owners claim were sickened or died from chicken jerky treats.

"We're just the ones who are online. There literally could be tens of thousands of people whose dogs were affected," said Safranek.

The group also keeps its own spreadsheet of victims, ranging from a 1-year old, five-pound Chihuahua named Kiarra to a 111-pound German Shepherd named Floyd.

"The problem with the issue is getting the word out," said Dr. Richard Goldstein, Chief of Medicine at The Animal Medical Center in New York City. Goldstein has been studying the connection between pet illnesses and chicken jerky treats made in China since 2007 and says although deaths have been rare in his experience, it's still crucial to seek veterinary care if a dog shows symptoms such as vomiting or lethargy.

"These are still on the shelves and cases are still popping up," said Goldstein, urging pet owners to be vigilant.

The issue has gained attention in Washington, and Sen. Sherrod Brown, D.-Ohio, who has been urging Congress to look closely at products coming from China, recently blasted the head of the FDA over the issue. At a Senate Appropriations hearing in April, Brown told Dr. Margaret Hamburg he was concerned that pet owners were still buying the treats, unaware they may possibly be tainted. "The FDA must be as aggressive as possible to find the source of this contamination," he said later in a press release.

Quoting LindaClement:

Unlikely to be related to trace amounts of antibiotics (given the vast quantities in regular market chicken in the US...)

Quoting annabl1970:

My aunt's dog had horrible diarrhea and vomiting after the eating purina chicken jerky.


Quoting LindaClement:

Well, that's excellent.

Save the dogs.



 

LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Jan. 14, 2013 at 9:27 PM
1 mom liked this

Yeah, I'm still going with 'unlikely to be related to trace amounts of antibiotics.'

Much more likely to be something else entirely. Since many Chinese believe dogs to be vermin, and a lot of others believe them to be food, it's not much of a surprise that they don't 'value' the integrity of precious pet food the way we do, here. 

Like a lot of the commercially-available foods (including, frighteningly, foods marketed specifically for children) in the early 'commercial food' era in the West when manufacturers put a lot of 'looks similar enough' ingredients into products for financial reasons, because they lacked understanding of what they were doing, or were so bewildered or disgusted about the yuck people were willing to pay for and eat, they figured there was no limit to what they could happily add...

A friend recently posted this lovely sleep remedy, on FB, a genuine label, apparently:

I believe the problem lies in the outsourcing and lack of oversight. 

Quoting annabl1970:

Chinese Pet Treats Linked to 900 Dog Deaths, Illnesses CINDY GALLI
May 23, 2012


 

Just six months after issuing its latest warning about chicken jerky dog treats made in China, the Food and Drug Administration confirms it has logged more than 900 complaints from pet owners who say their dogs either were sickened or died after eating the treats.

The number of complaints has nearly doubled since the story was first reported by ABC News in March. The FDA says its investigation is ongoing and that it continues to test samples of the popular treats, which dog owners across the country say have caused kidney failure in their pets, resulting in severe illness or death.

PHOTOS of dogs who allegedly died after eating Chinese jerky treats.

Consumers have largely blamed two brands for the reported illnesses. Waggin' Train and Canyon Creek Ranch, both produced by Nestle Purina and made in China, are reportedly included in the samples being tested by the FDA. The agency told ABC News it has solicited samples of treats from the owners of the pets allegedly affected, but will not say whether it is tested those samples. To date, the FDA has not been able to determine a cause for the reported illnesses.

The FDA issued its first warning about chicken jerky treats from China in 2007 and again in 2008, both times based on consumer complaints. But it wasn't until a third warning -- in late 2011 -- that the momentum of complaints accelerated as an angry population of pet owners demanded to know what in the Chinese treats might be sickening their dogs.

"It's hard to believe that we're still fighting the same battle," said Terry Safranek, whose 9-year old Fox Terrier named Sampson died of kidney failure in January.

Courtesy Terry Safranek
Sampson, a 9-year-old fox terrier, died of... View Full Size
PHOTO: Sampson, a 9-year-old fox terrier, died of kidney failure in January. His owners blame his death on Chinese jerky treats.
Courtesy Terry Safranek
Sampson, a 9-year-old fox terrier, died of kidney failure in January. His owners blame his death on Chinese jerky treats.

"The last thing that he ate and then threw up was the chicken jerky," said Safranek. "It kills me that the treats I fed him killed him."

Safranek is a member of a Facebook group called "Animal Parents Against Pet Treats Made In China," which has grown to 4,500 members and includes hundreds of photos of dogs whose owners claim were sickened or died from chicken jerky treats.

"We're just the ones who are online. There literally could be tens of thousands of people whose dogs were affected," said Safranek.

The group also keeps its own spreadsheet of victims, ranging from a 1-year old, five-pound Chihuahua named Kiarra to a 111-pound German Shepherd named Floyd.

"The problem with the issue is getting the word out," said Dr. Richard Goldstein, Chief of Medicine at The Animal Medical Center in New York City. Goldstein has been studying the connection between pet illnesses and chicken jerky treats made in China since 2007 and says although deaths have been rare in his experience, it's still crucial to seek veterinary care if a dog shows symptoms such as vomiting or lethargy.

"These are still on the shelves and cases are still popping up," said Goldstein, urging pet owners to be vigilant.

The issue has gained attention in Washington, and Sen. Sherrod Brown, D.-Ohio, who has been urging Congress to look closely at products coming from China, recently blasted the head of the FDA over the issue. At a Senate Appropriations hearing in April, Brown told Dr. Margaret Hamburg he was concerned that pet owners were still buying the treats, unaware they may possibly be tainted. "The FDA must be as aggressive as possible to find the source of this contamination," he said later in a press release.

Quoting LindaClement:

Unlikely to be related to trace amounts of antibiotics (given the vast quantities in regular market chicken in the US...)

Quoting annabl1970:

My aunt's dog had horrible diarrhea and vomiting after the eating purina chicken jerky.


Quoting LindaClement:

Well, that's excellent.

Save the dogs.



 


Euphoric
by Bazinga! on Jan. 14, 2013 at 9:31 PM
1 mom liked this

 Eek

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