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Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Kids and "Do Overs" in School

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So, I have a sixth grade son.

About two weeks before the winter break, he started a project. The kids all knew that it would be a major portion of their grade for social studies/history.

They could choose to work in groups or solo. My son chose solo, because, he told me, last group project ended with him doing the whole thing anyway, so it was easier to just work on his own.

They had class time for the project, but were expected to work on their own time as well and they had five weeks to do it, though ten days of this was over the break.

Yesterday, we got a note home. It had Conrad's score 73 of 75 points for the report and 23 of 25 for the oral presentation, total 96 points out of 100 possible. 

I talked to him about how he could have improved, but then I saw the note on top, which I had to sign and send back. 

It said that the teacher is allowing the kids who didn't do well to redo their reports to get their grades up. I saw the teacher at the grocery store later in the evening and asked about it. Conrad was only one of 5 kids (out of two classes of 29 kids) who actually put forth the effort to do research and complete the project acceptably. 

So, do you think that a do over of this is appropriate? Or should the kids learn from their mistake? 

I'm torn and I know I might feel differently if my child had not done well, but I also make sure he works on his school work and puts forth a decent effort to do well. This particular son, doesn't need much pushing, but I also make sure second son (the one who tries to do the very least he can to get by) does his work as well. 

So, again, for those of you who have made it this far: 

If the majority of a class fails a project, paper, test, etc. should there be a chance given for the kids to get a better grade, or should they learn from their experience and do better next time?  

by on Jan. 16, 2013 at 10:30 AM
Replies (41-50):
LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Jan. 16, 2013 at 2:11 PM

And if the teacher's instructions were poor?

Quoting OHgirlinCA:

 I say no do overs.  The students knew what had to be done and were given ample time to do it in.  They have to learn about responsibility and deadlines.  They have to learn from their mistakes.


GLWerth
by Gina on Jan. 16, 2013 at 2:16 PM

The instructions were written and very clear.

I honestly think that this happened more because this is the first time the kids were expected to follow the instructions without their parents having a copy as well. Flying solo, so to speak.

Quoting LindaClement:

And if the teacher's instructions were poor?

Quoting OHgirlinCA:

 I say no do overs.  The students knew what had to be done and were given ample time to do it in.  They have to learn about responsibility and deadlines.  They have to learn from their mistakes.



happinessforyou
by Bronze Member on Jan. 16, 2013 at 2:17 PM

This falls under "everyone should get a ribbon" theory. It's BS if you ask me. In the real world there might be a "do-over", but not very often. If I blow a big project at work, you can bet that my boss will be talking to me and it WON'T be about a do-over.....

This is more like: the majority of kids are not self-motivated and their parents are shirking their responsibility at home, so all the other kids got a crappy grade... tough $hit! THAT IS THE GRADE YOU HAVE EARNED!

LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Jan. 16, 2013 at 2:19 PM

Weird.

Do these kids have their parents sitting in their desks with them when the instructions are only in the classroom?

Quoting GLWerth:

The instructions were written and very clear.

I honestly think that this happened more because this is the first time the kids were expected to follow the instructions without their parents having a copy as well. Flying solo, so to speak.

Quoting LindaClement:

And if the teacher's instructions were poor?

Quoting OHgirlinCA:

 I say no do overs.  The students knew what had to be done and were given ample time to do it in.  They have to learn about responsibility and deadlines.  They have to learn from their mistakes.




TranquilMind
by Platinum Member on Jan. 16, 2013 at 2:22 PM

Welcome to today's schools.  Do-overs are how they keep their rankings and fundings.

My kids learned early on in their class situations to work alone because they would be carrying the group.  It's ridiculous. 

LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Jan. 16, 2013 at 2:23 PM

It's also how they keep their 'dropout' rates low... don't want to hurt their little feelings, ya know!

My kids get to work with a great number of these people. They are not impressed.

Quoting TranquilMind:

Welcome to today's schools.  Do-overs are how they keep their rankings and fundings.

My kids learned early on in their class situations to work alone because they would be carrying the group.  It's ridiculous. 


TranquilMind
by Platinum Member on Jan. 16, 2013 at 2:32 PM

What's even worse is that these kids who do nothing in school and whose hands are held for every assignment, and who get constant do-overs ...will run this country in 30 years!  No do-overs then!

Quoting LindaClement:

It's also how they keep their 'dropout' rates low... don't want to hurt their little feelings, ya know!

My kids get to work with a great number of these people. They are not impressed.

Quoting TranquilMind:

Welcome to today's schools.  Do-overs are how they keep their rankings and fundings.

My kids learned early on in their class situations to work alone because they would be carrying the group.  It's ridiculous. 



LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Jan. 16, 2013 at 2:40 PM

Interesting confluence of events: this conversation was mirrored in my National Post, today...

... a brilliant School Board director (of education!) from Toronto has recently been discovered to be a major, habitual plagerist. This is the final paragraph from Barbara Kay's scathing editorial:

"Which brings me back to Chris Spence and what he was thinking. When he was first 'caught,' Spence apologized, but did not offer to resign as he should have. As the scope of his duplicity came to light, he seemed to think enrolling in a course on 'ethics and journalism' would 'restore my reputation.' He doesn't understand.

"He can't restore it. He can't redo the 'assignment.' He's in real life now, not high school."

...

The looks on the faces of the co-workers when they discover that, yes, actually 'that' counted, and will continue to 'count' against them for the duration of their employment (or be included in their references)... it would be funny if it weren't so tragic.

Quoting TranquilMind:

What's even worse is that these kids who do nothing in school and whose hands are held for every assignment, and who get constant do-overs ...will run this country in 30 years!  No do-overs then!

Quoting LindaClement:

It's also how they keep their 'dropout' rates low... don't want to hurt their little feelings, ya know!

My kids get to work with a great number of these people. They are not impressed.

Quoting TranquilMind:

Welcome to today's schools.  Do-overs are how they keep their rankings and fundings.

My kids learned early on in their class situations to work alone because they would be carrying the group.  It's ridiculous. 




TranquilMind
by Platinum Member on Jan. 16, 2013 at 2:41 PM

Yeah, it is tragic. 

Quoting LindaClement:

Interesting confluence of events: this conversation was mirrored in my National Post, today...

... a brilliant School Board director (of education!) from Toronto has recently been discovered to be a major, habitual plagerist. This is the final paragraph from Barbara Kay's scathing editorial:

"Which brings me back to Chris Spence and what he was thinking. When he was first 'caught,' Spence apologized, but did not offer to resign as he should have. As the scope of his duplicity came to light, he seemed to think enrolling in a course on 'ethics and journalism' would 'restore my reputation.' He doesn't understand.

"He can't restore it. He can't redo the 'assignment.' He's in real life now, not high school."

...

The looks on the faces of the co-workers when they discover that, yes, actually 'that' counted, and will continue to 'count' against them for the duration of their employment (or be included in their references)... it would be funny if it weren't so tragic.

Quoting TranquilMind:

What's even worse is that these kids who do nothing in school and whose hands are held for every assignment, and who get constant do-overs ...will run this country in 30 years!  No do-overs then!

Quoting LindaClement:

It's also how they keep their 'dropout' rates low... don't want to hurt their little feelings, ya know!

My kids get to work with a great number of these people. They are not impressed.

Quoting TranquilMind:

Welcome to today's schools.  Do-overs are how they keep their rankings and fundings.

My kids learned early on in their class situations to work alone because they would be carrying the group.  It's ridiculous. 


 



JP-StrongForTwo
by on Jan. 16, 2013 at 2:44 PM

I had to read that twice lol i thought they were asking YOUR son to do over! I was thinking 'how perfect do they want these kids?!?!?! '

anyway now that i understand, 

i dont think they should get do overs. especially in 6th grade. 

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