Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Kids and "Do Overs" in School

Posted by   + Show Post

So, I have a sixth grade son.

About two weeks before the winter break, he started a project. The kids all knew that it would be a major portion of their grade for social studies/history.

They could choose to work in groups or solo. My son chose solo, because, he told me, last group project ended with him doing the whole thing anyway, so it was easier to just work on his own.

They had class time for the project, but were expected to work on their own time as well and they had five weeks to do it, though ten days of this was over the break.

Yesterday, we got a note home. It had Conrad's score 73 of 75 points for the report and 23 of 25 for the oral presentation, total 96 points out of 100 possible. 

I talked to him about how he could have improved, but then I saw the note on top, which I had to sign and send back. 

It said that the teacher is allowing the kids who didn't do well to redo their reports to get their grades up. I saw the teacher at the grocery store later in the evening and asked about it. Conrad was only one of 5 kids (out of two classes of 29 kids) who actually put forth the effort to do research and complete the project acceptably. 

So, do you think that a do over of this is appropriate? Or should the kids learn from their mistake? 

I'm torn and I know I might feel differently if my child had not done well, but I also make sure he works on his school work and puts forth a decent effort to do well. This particular son, doesn't need much pushing, but I also make sure second son (the one who tries to do the very least he can to get by) does his work as well. 

So, again, for those of you who have made it this far: 

If the majority of a class fails a project, paper, test, etc. should there be a chance given for the kids to get a better grade, or should they learn from their experience and do better next time?  

by on Jan. 16, 2013 at 10:30 AM
Replies (51-60):
Mommy_of_Riley
by Jes on Jan. 16, 2013 at 2:44 PM
That is awesome!

Quoting GLWerth:

Already did, then we went over what he could have improved (based on the great feedback from the teacher). I'm very proud of how hard he worked on this though.


Now, he's really interested in ancient history, as this was on the Sumerian civilization, so he's doing independent research on cultures that were influenced by the Sumerians. Yeah, he's a geek, but he comes by it honestly.


Quoting Mommy_of_Riley:

OP... Tell your son Bravo for doing his work and doing such a good job!


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Imacakebaker
by on Jan. 16, 2013 at 2:47 PM

 Your son did a great job.

Letting kids do over their projects doesn't effect your son's grade or effort.  If they didn't do it right the first time, if they don't do it over, how will they learn?   I'd be ok with it if it were my son.

GLWerth
by Gina on Jan. 16, 2013 at 3:08 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting Imacakebaker:

 Your son did a great job.

Letting kids do over their projects doesn't effect your son's grade or effort.  If they didn't do it right the first time, if they don't do it over, how will they learn?   I'd be ok with it if it were my son.

That is exactly why I asked for others' opinions. I know my biases and I wondered what others with different perspectives might think.

This has been really interesting to me, to see the different opinions on the situation.

I now think that having the kids do it over in response to the teacher's very good feedback is a learning experience in itself.

In work and higher education situations, you do often have to hand in a draft and redo it once it has been looked over by someone else, it will teach them editing and to be responsive to critique.

I hadn't thought of it that way before now.

GLWerth
by Gina on Jan. 16, 2013 at 3:09 PM
1 mom liked this

I'm overall very happy with my kids' school, but it makes me nuts when they come home and tell us they spent the afternoon watching a movie.

It is never an educational movie. Never.

Quoting jlo1313:

 Having a 6th grader and a 3rd grader, I can tell you they plan for plenty of "parties" and unnecessary activities during the school year that a few extra tests and class work assignments isn't going to impose on the cirricullum they need to cover :)

Quoting GLWerth:

Personally, I think assigning a new project to those who didn't do well might be a better idea, but some good points have been raised by others.

The idea of fixing it is worthwhile, but more for younger kids. Have them do that earlier in the school cycle. These kids will be in middle school next year and should  be able to do their work independently.

Quoting jlo1313:

 Wow, he did an awesome job! 

I don't agree with do-overs.  I still hold this ancient belief that school should prepare the children for life in the adult world and there are few opportunities for do-overs as adults. 

I understand the part about wanting the kids to learn the material, but I believe that is the opportunity for the teacher to go back and review it, offer up another project or test and measure the success rate, all while keeping the original grade for the original project. 

 

 


TruthSeeker.
by Milami on Jan. 16, 2013 at 3:14 PM

 Could not agree more.

Quoting stormcris:

I think there should be a do over for any grade/work/project given. The point of school is not to reward those who are better it is to teach those who are not. In such if they are never given a chance to do it over how do they "learn from their mistakes". Practice makes people better not some grade. Yes, competition can cause some children to strive to excel but it also hinders others. Not having them do it over would be a loss of opportunity to improve that seems to be lacking in the foundation of our education system in many areas. If a child is brought to believe they must be perfect the first time, each and every time, that child may decide if they cannot do something perfectly they should not do it at all. This can set in fairly quickly in the school years and can lead to a tragic non-productive adult life. Saying this I realize that the real world does not often give second chances, however, school is not the real world it is to learn how to improve yourself so you can manage those only one chance situations in the real world. 

 

GLWerth
by Gina on Jan. 16, 2013 at 3:21 PM

I wish they had this attitude in PE.

My oldest is an academic. He is not an athlete, he has little interest and, frankly, not much skill in athletics.

PE is his last class of the day and I know when those days are because he comes home looking as if he's been totally defeated. The PE teacher at our school loves to tell the less athletic kids that they are worthless losers (literally, I have heard him say, or rather, scream, this myself).

He also encourages the athletic kids to mock the ones who aren't gifted in that way, because it will "engage" the less gifted ones, forcing them to try harder.

He's the son of the superintendent, so it won't change.

When I asked if others felt this was appropriate, I was told that it is his way of motivating the kids to work harder. Mostly, it motivates my oldest to avoid physical activity because he doesn't want to be mocked.

Quoting TruthSeeker.:

 Could not agree more.

Quoting stormcris:

I think there should be a do over for any grade/work/project given. The point of school is not to reward those who are better it is to teach those who are not. In such if they are never given a chance to do it over how do they "learn from their mistakes". Practice makes people better not some grade. Yes, competition can cause some children to strive to excel but it also hinders others. Not having them do it over would be a loss of opportunity to improve that seems to be lacking in the foundation of our education system in many areas. If a child is brought to believe they must be perfect the first time, each and every time, that child may decide if they cannot do something perfectly they should not do it at all. This can set in fairly quickly in the school years and can lead to a tragic non-productive adult life. Saying this I realize that the real world does not often give second chances, however, school is not the real world it is to learn how to improve yourself so you can manage those only one chance situations in the real world. 

 


FrogSalad
by Sooze on Jan. 16, 2013 at 3:26 PM
1 mom liked this

My first reaction was to say, no do-overs.  After reading through the responses, I can see the value in allowing them, but I feel that those kids who finished the assignment correctly the first time should receive some kind of extra recognition for meeting the original deadline.

LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Jan. 16, 2013 at 3:29 PM

And, of course, there is the real-world equivalent: handing in a draft and having it critiqued for editing and polishing.

Usually that is called 'cheating' in schools.

Quoting FrogSalad:

My first reaction was to say, no do-overs.  After reading through the responses, I can see the value in allowing them, but I feel that those kids who finished the assignment correctly the first time should receive some kind of extra recognition for meeting the original deadline.


TruthSeeker.
by Milami on Jan. 16, 2013 at 4:28 PM

 That is awful!! Superintendent or not, I would be raising a stink about the way that PE teachers speaks to the kids!

Quoting GLWerth:

I wish they had this attitude in PE.

My oldest is an academic. He is not an athlete, he has little interest and, frankly, not much skill in athletics.

PE is his last class of the day and I know when those days are because he comes home looking as if he's been totally defeated. The PE teacher at our school loves to tell the less athletic kids that they are worthless losers (literally, I have heard him say, or rather, scream, this myself).

He also encourages the athletic kids to mock the ones who aren't gifted in that way, because it will "engage" the less gifted ones, forcing them to try harder.

He's the son of the superintendent, so it won't change.

When I asked if others felt this was appropriate, I was told that it is his way of motivating the kids to work harder. Mostly, it motivates my oldest to avoid physical activity because he doesn't want to be mocked.

Quoting TruthSeeker.:

 Could not agree more.

Quoting stormcris:

I think there should be a do over for any grade/work/project given. The point of school is not to reward those who are better it is to teach those who are not. In such if they are never given a chance to do it over how do they "learn from their mistakes". Practice makes people better not some grade. Yes, competition can cause some children to strive to excel but it also hinders others. Not having them do it over would be a loss of opportunity to improve that seems to be lacking in the foundation of our education system in many areas. If a child is brought to believe they must be perfect the first time, each and every time, that child may decide if they cannot do something perfectly they should not do it at all. This can set in fairly quickly in the school years and can lead to a tragic non-productive adult life. Saying this I realize that the real world does not often give second chances, however, school is not the real world it is to learn how to improve yourself so you can manage those only one chance situations in the real world. 

 

 

 

Bieg9093
by Bronze Member on Jan. 16, 2013 at 4:36 PM

 Here's the thing...LOTS of kids don't care about grades.  They just don't want to do the work.  Getting a bad grade doesn't bother them; they're just glad to have gotten out of it.  The best thing to do for them (and they would say the worst thing you could do TO them) is to make them do it. 

The policy of giving multiple chances to do the work for reduced credit is good for all the kids.  The kids who care and get it done on time get the benefit of full credit.  The kids who don't care get a lesson in the fact that responsibilities don't just go away if ignored.  Win-win.

ETA  I, personally, would arrange for extra playground time or a fun craft for the kids who got their business handled on time. 

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)