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What are your thoughts about 'The Poor People's Campaign'?

Posted by on Jan. 17, 2013 at 6:11 PM
  • 26 Replies

I posted this a tribute in remembrance of Martin Luther King. He was an amazing man with incredible foresight. Clearly he was RIGHT.


THE POOR PEOPLE'S CAMPAIGN INC

DR. Martin Luther King, JR. Legacy and our Future   

              
 
 
On behalf of the Board of Directors of The Poor People's Campaign  we thank you for visiting our web site.
 
Today, we are all challenged to continue the nonviolent struggle for real equality, authentic justice and responsible freedom for all. This means ensuring that our nation provides stable living-wage jobs, quality healthcare and education, affordable housing, and an environment of peace for all People.
 
The Poor People's Campaign inc is committed to continuing the legacy of The Dr. Martin Luther King, jr, which is the nonviolent opposition to social and economic injustices wherever and whenever they may exist. It is our objective to lead the fight against oppression, working together with churches, community based organizations, labor unions, and the community at large to validate the dignity and worth of every human being. We must remember,A house divided shall not stand,
 
We, The Poor People of The U.S.A Demand:Decent Jobs and Income! The Right to a Decent Life!!!!!!!


In 1967, one in seven Americans lives in poverty. The Southern Christian Leadership Conference embarks on an ambitious Poor People's Campaign to bring attention to the nation's most needy people. In response to black rioting in 180 cities during the summer of 1967, Martin Luther King says, "the riot is the language of the unheard... America has failed to hear... that the promises of freedom and justice have not been met." Economic inequities are the next target for the movement. Activist Marian Wright suggests to King that the movement stage a poor people's march in Washington, D.C., and SCLC begins planning to bring "a nonviolent army of the poor" to the nation's attention. They are joined by the National Welfare Rights Organization.

In the midst of organizing, King detours to support striking sanitation workers in Memphis, where he is assassinated on April 4, 1968. Riots erupt around the country as people mourn the loss. The SCLC presses forward with the Poor People's Campaign just weeks later, settling people on the National Mall in an encampment they call "Resurrection City." Jesse Jackson leads protesters in direct actions around the city, and in chants of "I am somebody." However, the protest fails after heavy rains and unclear agendas bog down the participants. In the midst of their efforts, word comes that presidential candidate Robert Kennedy, a champion of civil rights, has been assassinated in California. In recognition of the poor people's protest, the hearse bearing Kennedy's body is brought through the encampment in Washington. The spirit has gone out of people, and soon Resurrection City is shut down.

by on Jan. 17, 2013 at 6:11 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Imacakebaker
by on Jan. 17, 2013 at 6:14 PM

 National Welfare Rights Organization? 

Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Jan. 17, 2013 at 6:18 PM


Quoting Imacakebaker:

 National Welfare Rights Organization? 

Not welfare as in 'public assistance' necessarily


wel·fare

[wel-fair] 

noun

1.
the good fortune, health, happiness, prosperity, etc., of a person, group, or organization; well-being: to look after a child's welfare; the physical or moral welfare of society.
krysstizzle
by on Jan. 17, 2013 at 6:25 PM

Interesting. I hadn't heard of this before. 

I don't think it's so crazy to want to have honest discussions about what our society's potential is to truly work on reducing poverty, not through band-aid quick fixes but through a true re-working of a broken system, including fixing broken communities. 

krysstizzle
by on Jan. 17, 2013 at 6:29 PM
3 moms liked this

Because I've been on CM too much today, I'm going to assume you're being snarky.

I've found that, generally speaking, those who always assume poor people want nothing more than welfare/cash don't work in impoverished communities with impoverished people. People who make such assumptions about the poor usually have no fucking idea what they're talking about. People living in poverty don't want an extra hundred dollars a month so that they only have to make 2 difficult choices rather than 3. They (generally and in my personal experience and that of others who actually do real world on the ground work) want an opportunity. If you think everyone in this society has true equal opportunity, you don't truly understand poverty in this society. 

Quoting Imacakebaker:

 National Welfare Rights Organization? 


Imacakebaker
by on Jan. 17, 2013 at 6:34 PM

 Yeah, where did I say any of that?

I was just questioning a "National Welfare Society."  Never heard of that, in the 1960's it most likely had a different connotation than today.  By today's standards it sounds like lazy people wanting handouts.

People here in the US do have choices and opportunity.  Even poor kids can get a great education if they choose to study, there are many people who mentor, there are many scholarships.  There is more opportunity here to do better than in most other countries.

Quoting krysstizzle:

Because I've been on CM too much today, I'm going to assume you're being snarky.

I've found that, generally speaking, those who always assume poor people want nothing more than welfare/cash don't work in impoverished communities with impoverished people. People who make such assumptions about the poor usually have no fucking idea what they're talking about. People living in poverty don't want an extra hundred dollars a month so that they only have to make 2 difficult choices rather than 3. They (generally and in my personal experience and that of others who actually do real world on the ground work) want an opportunity. If you think everyone in this society has true equal opportunity, you don't truly understand poverty in this society. 

Quoting Imacakebaker:

 National Welfare Rights Organization? 


 

krysstizzle
by on Jan. 17, 2013 at 6:37 PM

Yeah, like I said, if you truly think everyone has equal opportunity in this country, you don't understand poverty. 

Equal education? Shit, I work in communities that are unicorporated and have no running water. Do you understand the implications of that and what that truly means on a day to day basis to a family in America? 

Quoting Imacakebaker:

 Yeah, where did I say any of that?

I was just questioning a "National Welfare Society."  Never heard of that, in the 1960's it most likely had a different connotation than today.  By today's standards it sounds like lazy people wanting handouts.

People here in the US do have choices and opportunity.  Even poor kids can get a great education if they choose to study, there are many people who mentor, there are many scholarships.  There is more opportunity here to do better than in most other countries.

Quoting krysstizzle:

Because I've been on CM too much today, I'm going to assume you're being snarky.

I've found that, generally speaking, those who always assume poor people want nothing more than welfare/cash don't work in impoverished communities with impoverished people. People who make such assumptions about the poor usually have no fucking idea what they're talking about. People living in poverty don't want an extra hundred dollars a month so that they only have to make 2 difficult choices rather than 3. They (generally and in my personal experience and that of others who actually do real world on the ground work) want an opportunity. If you think everyone in this society has true equal opportunity, you don't truly understand poverty in this society. 

Quoting Imacakebaker:

 National Welfare Rights Organization? 


 


tiesthatbind
by on Jan. 17, 2013 at 6:39 PM

that's what it sounds like ~

Quoting Imacakebaker:

 National Welfare Rights Organization? 


Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Jan. 17, 2013 at 8:46 PM

I just wanted to post some food for thought about what progress may have meant 50 years ago

talia-mom
by Gold Member on Jan. 17, 2013 at 9:29 PM
Ah yes. More sob stories that the poor can't receive a good education.
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krysstizzle
by on Jan. 17, 2013 at 10:08 PM
3 moms liked this

I know, right? How stupid. I mean, even children who are hungry and have no running water in their community have as much energy, time, and resources put into their education. Like there's any such thing as disparity in school districts based on income! Pshaw!


Quoting talia-mom:

Ah yes. More sob stories that the poor can't receive a good education.


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