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3 Things You Should Never Do for Your Kids

Posted by on Jan. 20, 2013 at 6:18 PM
  • 14 Replies


3 Things You Should Never Do for Your Kids

Here are three things you should never do for your children:

1. Homework - How many times have you watched parents do their children's homework for them? One minute you're shaking your head in disgust and the next minute you're holding a #2 pencil in your hand writing an essay on the French revolution. Face it. It's easy to get sucked in by your child.

Those frustrating cries of "I can't do it!" can weaken even the most steadfast parent. Sometimes it seems far easier just to do the work for your child. But before you give in, stop, look and listen hard. Your child first should attempt to the work on his own.

If he is genuinely confused about the subject at hand, take a moment to look over the questions. Ask your child what he thinks the questions mean. If possible, show examples of how to solve the problem. Avoid doing the actual problem for your child. Once you feel like he has a grasp on the subject matter, send him back to his desk to finish the work.

Do not sit over him while he is doing his homework, as he will be inclined to ask for further assistance repeatedly. After all of the work is completed, glance over the assignment for any glaring errors. When you find mistakes, have your child redo the problems until they are correct. While it's fine to show examples, brainstorm and encourage, do not -- and we repeat -- do not do the work for him. Doing reports, projects and homework independently will actually increase your child's self-confidence and self esteem. Nothing compares to the sense of accomplishment your child will have knowing that he earned that "A" on his own.

2. Speak for them - It's far too easy to put words in your child's mouth. Children are works in progress. As they get older, they come into their own.

However, being a child can often be intimidating. Children are often insecure and, at times, unable to properly express themselves. In many cases, he may expect you to be his spokesperson.Whether it's asking a neighborhood child to play or requesting a cup of water at a restaurant, always encourage your child to use his voice.

It might be just as easy for you to do your child's bidding, but how will he ever gain self- confidence if he never has to speak for himself? Oftentimes, we feel compelled to speak on our child's behalf. For example, in school your child might have issues with a fellow student. If the situation puts your child in danger, it's understandable that you would get involved. However, if things haven't escalated, encourage your child to work things out on his own. It's fine to make suggestions of things he might say to smooth things over and resolve the conflict. However, try not to take things into your own hands unless it's an absolute necessity.

Keep this important rule of thumb in mind when you are also among a group of people. When your child is asked a question, it might be instinctive to respond for him. Don't. Give your child a chance to speak for himself. Over time, you will notice him becoming more and more confident in the way he expresses himself. Remember, practice makes perfect.

3. Choose their friends - This one is a real doozy. It's only natural to want to pick your child's friends - whether it's the sweet little boy from Sunday school or that adorable girl from the playground. In your mind, you think you know what - and who - is best for your child. And you probably do. But this is one of those lessons your child needs to learn on his own. While you will probably be responsible for fostering many of their friendships through play dates in the early years, your child will be more and more inclined to choose his own pals as he gets older. This is one of those cases when you should go with the flow.

Just because you might be friends with someone doesn't necessarily mean your child when be friends with that person's child. First and foremost, don't force it. Your child will only resent you in the end if you make him spend time with someone he doesn't particularly care for. There's nothing wrong with introducing him to new faces. However, let him take the lead when it comes to building lasting friendships.

At the same time, you still have a responsibility to ensure that your child is playing with kids who have similar values. In other words, you probably want to prevent your children from hanging out with kids who swear, steal, misbehave and have other habits you don't want your own child picking up. Always be aware of who your child is hanging around.

At the end of the day, what you don't do for your children is every bit as important as what you do. Sometimes a more hands-off approach actually will benefit your child.

http://www.mydailymoment.com/moms/parenting/3_things_you_should_never_do_for_your_kids.php?page=1

Can you agree with this list?


by on Jan. 20, 2013 at 6:18 PM
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Replies (1-10):
turtle68
by Mahinaarangi on Jan. 20, 2013 at 6:23 PM
2 moms liked this

 check 123...

 

futureshock
by Ruby Member on Jan. 20, 2013 at 6:44 PM

Makes sense. :)

cRystienah
by on Jan. 20, 2013 at 6:46 PM
I agree
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Euphoric
by Bazinga! on Jan. 20, 2013 at 6:47 PM

 I agree.

motherslove82
by Silver Member on Jan. 20, 2013 at 6:50 PM
Sounds reasonable.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
canadianmom1974
by Gold Member on Jan. 20, 2013 at 6:51 PM
I completely agree.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
jdy9440
by on Jan. 20, 2013 at 6:53 PM
True
stacymomof2
by Ruby Member on Jan. 20, 2013 at 6:55 PM

I can get on board with all of those. 

sassysuie
by Member on Jan. 20, 2013 at 6:57 PM

Simple enough.

Bek22
by on Jan. 20, 2013 at 8:57 PM

Agree

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