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Is your nutritionist sponsored by Coca Cola? Very probably...

Posted by on Jan. 23, 2013 at 8:55 PM
  • 9 Replies

And Now a Word from Our Sponsors
New York Times Covers New Report From Eat Drink Politics

January 23, 2012
 
Public health attorney Michele Simon asks: Are America’s nutrition professionals in the pocket of Big Food? While the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ 74,000-member trade group partners with the likes of Coke and Hershey’s, the nation’s health continues to suffer from poor diet. 

The largest trade group of nutrition professionals—the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics—has a serious credibility problem. In a damningreport released today, industry watchdog Eat Drink Politics examines the various forms of corporate sponsorship by Big Food that are undermining the integrity of those professionals most responsible for educating Americans about healthy eating.

The report details, for example, how registered dietitians can earn continuing education units from Coca-Cola, in which they learn that sugar is not a problem for children and how Nestlé, the world’s largest food company can pay $50,000 to host a two-hour “nutrition symposium” at the Academy’s annual meeting. Additional disturbing findings from the report include:
  • Beginning in 2001, the Academy listed 10 food industry sponsors; the 2011 annual report lists 38, a more than three-fold increase;
  • Companies on the Academy’s list of approved continuing education providers include Coca-Cola, Kraft Foods, Nestlé, and PepsiCo;
  • At the 2012 annual meeting, 18 organizations – less than five percent of all exhibitors – captured 25 percent of the total exhibitor space. Only two out of the 18 represented whole, non-processed foods;
  • The Corn Refiners Association (lobbyists for high fructose corn syrup) sponsored three “expo impact” sessions at the 2012 annual meeting;
  • A majority of registered dietitians surveyed found three current Academy sponsors “unacceptable” (Coca-Cola, Mars, and PepsiCo);
  • 80 percent of registered dietitians said sponsorship implies Academy endorsement of that company and their products;
  • The Academy has not supported controversial nutrition policies that might upset corporate sponsors, such as limits on soft drink sizes, soda taxes, or GMO labels; 
  • Sponsors and their activities appear to violate the Academy’s own sponsorship guidelines.
Among the report’s recommendations are for the Academy to: 1) provide greater transparency on corporate funding sources; 2) gather input from all members on corporate sponsorship; 3) reject all corporate-sponsored education; and 4) provide better leadership on controversial nutrition policy issues. Registered dietitian and Academy member Andy Bellatti, who has long criticized his professional group’s conflicted corporate sponsorships said:
Michele Simon’s report on the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is thoroughly researched and expertly points out the different ways in which the nation’s leading nutrition organization harms its reputation, efficacy, and members by forming partnerships with food companies that care more about selling products than they do about improving the health of Americans. Anyone concerned about public health will realize that the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is in dire need of systemic change if it hopes to take a leadership role and be taken seriously as the home base of the nation’s nutrition experts.
http://www.eatdrinkpolitics.com/
by on Jan. 23, 2013 at 8:55 PM
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Replies (1-9):
tweety101149
by Platinum Member on Jan. 23, 2013 at 9:27 PM

Evidently one needs to know more about their nutritionists these days.  Just because your best friend, or a hollywood star recommends this one or that one doesn't mean it works.  First check out if it is recommended by the American Heart Association, or American Diabetes Association, Make sure there are not any other risk factors like hidden calories,   Learn about substitute foods, like whole wheat instead of white bread, splenda white/or brown sugar. My husband's nutritionist is refered by our primary doctor.  She is not sponsored by anyone or any corporation. She holds a phd in nutrition, and only recommneds natural foods.   I wish more people would find a nutritionist like her.

butterfly on headlynda  




krysstizzle
by DeepThought on Jan. 23, 2013 at 9:36 PM

I don't have a nutritionist (or know anyone that does, honestly). 

The thing that is particularly irritating is the the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (which is where nutritions and dieticians are registered) is taking so much money from Coca Cola and other processed foods companies. 

Quoting tweety101149:

Evidently one needs to know more about their nutritionists these days.  Just because your best friend, or a hollywood star recommends this one or that one doesn't mean it works.  First check out if it is recommended by the American Heart Association, or American Diabetes Association, Make sure there are not any other risk factors like hidden calories,   Learn about substitute foods, like whole wheat instead of white bread, splenda white/or brown sugar. My husband's nutritionist is refered by our primary doctor.  She is not sponsored by anyone or any corporation. She holds a phd in nutrition, and only recommneds natural foods.   I wish more people would find a nutritionist like her.


Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Jan. 23, 2013 at 9:37 PM

I dislike that this suggests that nutritionists and dietitians can be bought by the never ending pockets of corporate America.

Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Jan. 23, 2013 at 9:38 PM


Quoting krysstizzle:

I don't have a nutritionist (or know anyone that does, honestly). 

The thing that is particularly irritating is the the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (which is where nutritions and dieticians are registered) is taking so much money from Coca Cola and other processed foods companies. 

Quoting tweety101149:

Evidently one needs to know more about their nutritionists these days.  Just because your best friend, or a hollywood star recommends this one or that one doesn't mean it works.  First check out if it is recommended by the American Heart Association, or American Diabetes Association, Make sure there are not any other risk factors like hidden calories,   Learn about substitute foods, like whole wheat instead of white bread, splenda white/or brown sugar. My husband's nutritionist is refered by our primary doctor.  She is not sponsored by anyone or any corporation. She holds a phd in nutrition, and only recommneds natural foods.   I wish more people would find a nutritionist like her.


As long as the money doesn't come with strings and a puppet master they should take it do do good with it IMO.


krysstizzle
by DeepThought on Jan. 23, 2013 at 9:39 PM

*snicker*... wait, is that sarcasm? My brain is broken right now :/

Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:

I dislike that this suggests that nutritionists and dietitians can be bought by the never ending pockets of corporate America.


Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Jan. 23, 2013 at 9:40 PM


Quoting krysstizzle:

*snicker*... wait, is that sarcasm? My brain is broken right now :/

Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:

I dislike that this suggests that nutritionists and dietitians can be bought by the never ending pockets of corporate America.


Not this time. Sorry!   = )


krysstizzle
by DeepThought on Jan. 23, 2013 at 9:45 PM

That's actually something I struggle with constantly, actually (not in regards to dieticians particularly); what influence does corporate sponsership have over the groups they fund?

I tended to think that accepting the evil money to do good things was the way to go. (Excuse the hyperbole...)

I went to a conference not too long ago, anti-hunger, and the sponsers were Wal Mart and ConAgra. The things I heard there from corporate spokespeople made my toes curl. From one keynote speaker, I heard the following, all in a 10 minute time frame in which my head nearly exploded: gmo's should never be labeled, we don't need to push for healthier lunches in schools, and we shouldn't be working to make farmers markets more accessible to low income people (or in his words "poor people don't need to be shopping at farmers markets"). 

After I heard from the spokesperson that corporate philanthopy is no longer just cutting a check but being active partners and using their funded organizations to get ties in communities, I decided (reading between the lines) that they could take their money and shove it. 

Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:


Quoting krysstizzle:

I don't have a nutritionist (or know anyone that does, honestly). 

The thing that is particularly irritating is the the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (which is where nutritions and dieticians are registered) is taking so much money from Coca Cola and other processed foods companies. 

Quoting tweety101149:

Evidently one needs to know more about their nutritionists these days.  Just because your best friend, or a hollywood star recommends this one or that one doesn't mean it works.  First check out if it is recommended by the American Heart Association, or American Diabetes Association, Make sure there are not any other risk factors like hidden calories,   Learn about substitute foods, like whole wheat instead of white bread, splenda white/or brown sugar. My husband's nutritionist is refered by our primary doctor.  She is not sponsored by anyone or any corporation. She holds a phd in nutrition, and only recommneds natural foods.   I wish more people would find a nutritionist like her.


As long as the money doesn't come with strings and a puppet master they should take it do do good with it IMO.


Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Jan. 23, 2013 at 9:56 PM

agreed

Quoting krysstizzle:

After I heard from the spokesperson that corporate philanthopy is no longer just cutting a check but being active partners and using their funded organizations to get ties in communities, I decided (reading between the lines) that they could take their money and shove it. 

lga1965
by Ruby Member on Jan. 23, 2013 at 10:27 PM

 LOL, I don't have a Nutritionist . I read everything about vitamins, diet,real food, etc. and I don't even take the "Food Pyramid" seriously. It is pretty much created by those who want to convince us to buy THEIR food. Notice that whole grains are toward the bottom of the pyramid and guess who profits from that? LOL.

Organc and non GMO foods are what we need, I think.

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