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Emissions pose health threat to Ohio drilling neighbors, family doctor says

Posted by on Jan. 25, 2013 at 8:29 AM
  • 5 Replies


Emissions pose health threat to Ohio drilling neighbors, family doctor says

By Bob Downing
Beacon Journal staff writer

Ohio loves its Utica shale for jobs, economic growth and energy, but Dr. Deborah Cowden sees a darker side.

Cowden is a family practice doctor who is convinced that air emissions from that drilling, especially the new large wells being fractured, or fracked, pose a big threat to site neighbors in Ohio.

She shares her concerns up to four times a month at grass-root meetings across eastern Ohio. She will speak in Portage County at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at King of Glory Church on state Route 303 in Streetsboro.

Cowden’s advice to Ohioans: If there is drilling within a half-mile of your house, get out and stay out as much as possible during the drilling process.

Youngsters should be kept away as much as possible to minimize exposure to as many as 78 toxic chemicals in the air, says Cowden, who lives in Loudonville in Ashland County and works for the Knox County Health Department.

Neighbors “need a lot of time away” to reduce possible exposures to such chemicals as cancer-causing benzene and xylene, she said.

“You need to do something to lessen your exposure if you live near a well or downwind of wells. ... There’s a lot of bad stuff with health effects.”

Breathing in such chemicals is harmful and is associated with an array of symptoms, she said.

The fact so many chemicals are involved makes it more difficult to truly assess the health threat to individuals, she said, citing two studies of fracking in Colorado.

The worst air exposures occur after the well has been fractured, when liquids are being removed in advance of production beginning, she said.

“Even when everything is going right,” drilling poses a health threat to neighbors, Cowden said.

Drilling is also dependent on diesel engines for pumps and for trucks that haul materials. Those fumes add to the air woes, she said.

The Ohio Legislature and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources have adopted rules the state says make drilling safe.

Last April, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency approved the first federal rules on air emissions, but delayed full implementation — after the oil and gas industry complained — until Jan. 1, 2015.

The new safeguards are expected to cut emissions of volatile organic compounds from drilling by nearly 25 percent and VOC emissions from new and modified fracked wells by almost 95 percent, the EPA said. They also will reduce escaped methane, the key component of natural gas and a potent global warming gas. Up to 15 percent of methane can be lost into the air, according to the industry.

Cowden is also worried that pockets of hydrogen sulfide pose a deadly, and mostly ignored, threat to Ohioans.

Drillers can strike pockets of the naturally occurring gas — it smells like rotten eggs — and, depending of concentrations, that can be deadly, Cowden said.

“Hydrogen sulfide is a big problem in Ohio,” she said.

Neighbors are at risk when drillers hit such pockets, but very little information is provided them about what to do and what not to do when that happens, she said.

The gas killed a driller in 2009 at a well in Guernsey County.

Cowden started looking at hydraulic fracturing after she and her husband, Greg, an electrical engineer, rejected a lease offer on their 15 acres. She was troubled by what she found and worried about the need for more medical research.

“We just do what we can do. We’re trying to find the facts and disseminate them. Some fights you must fight, even if you know deep down that you’re going to lose,” she said. “Maybe we can help some people. We have to alert people to the threat.”

Bob Downing can be reached at 330-996-3745 or bdowning@thebeaconjournal.com.

How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


by on Jan. 25, 2013 at 8:29 AM
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Replies (1-5):
radioheid
by Libertarian on Jan. 25, 2013 at 9:03 AM

 I live in Trumbull County, right next door to Portage, and a couple counties over from Guernsey (I have family in both). I will say that the egg smell mentioned in the article is fucking awful. My sister and I caught a whiff heading down to Zanesville last month, and man, it is wretched.


"Roger that. Over."

R   A   D    I    O    H    E    I    D

survivorinohio
by René on Jan. 25, 2013 at 9:09 AM


Quoting radioheid:

 I live in Trumbull County, right next door to Portage, and a couple counties over from Guernsey (I have family in both). I will say that the egg smell mentioned in the article is fucking awful. My sister and I caught a whiff heading down to Zanesville last month, and man, it is wretched.

I am not happy about the hows and wheres they are drilling.  Not at all. I am concerned with our aquifers, and the stability of our land just to name a few.  I get that the resource iis important but killing the future to save the day is redundant.

How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


jlo1313
by Silver Member on Jan. 25, 2013 at 9:46 AM
1 mom liked this

 I have done a ton of research and reading on fracking because of Marcellus and them wanting to do so over here in WV, I lived in Wyoming briefly during the late 90's and knew of the damage to the water aquifers and illnesses people had in rural areas that were fracked in the 80's and 90's there.  We should all be concerned, but unfortunately we are lied to when it comes to the safety of fracking.  I am glad a doctor is speaking out.  The recent earthquakes should be the first sign that something is terribly wrong with this process.  Anything that compromises the structure of the plates in the earth causing earthquakes where plates do not normally shift should be the first clue that this is dangerous.  While I really want to bring the jobs and the resources here, I wish there were a safer way to extract, one less threatening to the health of residents and workers and one far less dangerous to our land.  Hydrofracked is a free Kindle book on Amazon to read, its written about fracking in Wyoming and the struggles of homeowners with the government and their health.  I am just not okay with some of the things I have read in this and several other pieces I have found about fracking done and how the process is said to have changed, but if you pay attention...it really hasn't changed at all. 

survivorinohio
by René on Jan. 25, 2013 at 9:51 AM

I have been so upset by this.  I fully believe fracking is very very bad news.

I was crying all morning while I read the news, ignorance IS bliss :(

Quoting jlo1313:

 I have done a ton of research and reading on fracking because of Marcellus and them wanting to do so over here in WV, I lived in Wyoming briefly during the late 90's and knew of the damage to the water aquifers and illnesses people had in rural areas that were fracked in the 80's and 90's there.  We should all be concerned, but unfortunately we are lied to when it comes to the safety of fracking.  I am glad a doctor is speaking out.  The recent earthquakes should be the first sign that something is terribly wrong with this process.  Anything that compromises the structure of the plates in the earth causing earthquakes where plates do not normally shift should be the first clue that this is dangerous.  While I really want to bring the jobs and the resources here, I wish there were a safer way to extract, one less threatening to the health of residents and workers and one far less dangerous to our land.  Hydrofracked is a free Kindle book on Amazon to read, its written about fracking in Wyoming and the struggles of homeowners with the government and their health.  I am just not okay with some of the things I have read in this and several other pieces I have found about fracking done and how the process is said to have changed, but if you pay attention...it really hasn't changed at all. 


How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


jlo1313
by Silver Member on Jan. 25, 2013 at 9:56 AM

 It sure is, I have dedicated much of my spare time to learning more about things like this and it ends up upsetting me.  The problem is I never know if I am more upset with the government treating its citizens like idiots and hiding facts or if I am more upset with the citizens for not making a stand and demanding truth and answers.  Or just not giving a damn at all about what they leave behind for their children and grand children.

Quoting survivorinohio:

I have been so upset by this.  I fully believe fracking is very very bad news.

I was crying all morning while I read the news, ignorance IS bliss :(

Quoting jlo1313:

 I have done a ton of research and reading on fracking because of Marcellus and them wanting to do so over here in WV, I lived in Wyoming briefly during the late 90's and knew of the damage to the water aquifers and illnesses people had in rural areas that were fracked in the 80's and 90's there.  We should all be concerned, but unfortunately we are lied to when it comes to the safety of fracking.  I am glad a doctor is speaking out.  The recent earthquakes should be the first sign that something is terribly wrong with this process.  Anything that compromises the structure of the plates in the earth causing earthquakes where plates do not normally shift should be the first clue that this is dangerous.  While I really want to bring the jobs and the resources here, I wish there were a safer way to extract, one less threatening to the health of residents and workers and one far less dangerous to our land.  Hydrofracked is a free Kindle book on Amazon to read, its written about fracking in Wyoming and the struggles of homeowners with the government and their health.  I am just not okay with some of the things I have read in this and several other pieces I have found about fracking done and how the process is said to have changed, but if you pay attention...it really hasn't changed at all. 


 


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