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In our Obsession to Combat Childhood Obesity

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Child eating disorders on the rise

By Cindy Harb, Special to CNN
updated 6:59 AM EDT, Wed August 22, 2012

Fat is the new ugly on the playground

A study conducted by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality showed that hospitalizations for eating disorders in children under 12 increased by 119% between 1999 and 2006. More recent numbers are unavailable, but experts say the problem isn't getting any better.

Children will come in to her office already showing signs of malnutrition, dietician Page Love says. They often have low energy levels and low iron counts and are reporting hair loss because of their extreme weight loss.

Most, like Smith, do not recognize that their restrictive habits are actually an eating disorder that could ultimately be fatal.

Dina Zeckhausen is a psychologist and founder of the Eating Disorder Information Network. She sees kids in third and fourth grade who are already worried about being fat.

"There is so much emphasis on obesity," Zeckhausen said, "that there's a danger that we are going to produce a lot of anxieties in kids around weight."

Zeckhausen says that starting overweight kids on diets can trigger an obsession with food that could lead to an eating disorder.

by on Jan. 26, 2013 at 7:55 AM
Replies (11-20):
rfurlongg
by on Jan. 26, 2013 at 9:07 AM
Where are people using shame on a mass scale? Honest question. We do not watch tv. Certainly at my children's school the focus is on health and not shaming.

Quoting brookiecookie87:


The Solution is pretty simple. Educate kids about healthy foods and give them activities to do.

The problem we are seeing is because people want to use shame. When you use shame to try and fight the problem you will get teenagers (Maybe even kids) who develop eating disorders


Quoting rfurlongg:

Teaching healthy eating habits starts early. However, for those children that do become obese at young ages how do we as a society help them loose weight without instigating further health issues? The article presents a problem, but no solution.




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brookiecookie87
by Platinum Member on Jan. 26, 2013 at 9:11 AM

 Tv. They have commercials now that use fat shaming.

And people are even suggesting we use it:

http://www.cafemom.com/group/99198/forums/read/17961456/Fat_shaming_may_curb_obesity_bioethicist_says

Quoting rfurlongg:

Where are people using shame on a mass scale? Honest question. We do not watch tv. Certainly at my children's school the focus is on health and not shaming.

Quoting brookiecookie87:


The Solution is pretty simple. Educate kids about healthy foods and give them activities to do.

The problem we are seeing is because people want to use shame. When you use shame to try and fight the problem you will get teenagers (Maybe even kids) who develop eating disorders


Quoting rfurlongg:

Teaching healthy eating habits starts early. However, for those children that do become obese at young ages how do we as a society help them loose weight without instigating further health issues? The article presents a problem, but no solution.






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If they enforced bank regulations like they do park rules, we wouldn't be in this mess

sneffy014
by Bronze Member on Jan. 26, 2013 at 9:28 AM

Obesity is a SYMPTOM of unhealthy eating and exercise habits. Unfortunately it is a visual symptom and people tend to focus on that rather than the health aspect. People discriminate against FAT. High Blood Pressure, High Cholesterol, Diabetes, etc. are also problems associated with unhealthy eating but you can't see them with the naked eye so  a "THIN" child/person LOOKS better and is not subject to the same discrimination.. I think as a society we need to focus on healthy eating and exercise for ALL.

Euphoric
by Thumper kid spanks on Jan. 26, 2013 at 10:12 AM

 bump

AdrianneHill
by Platinum Member on Jan. 26, 2013 at 10:24 AM
You can be fat and still malnourished. I think that will be the be health problem. Fat kids with iron and/or vitamin deficiencies suffering from extra weight and from the health problems caused by bad nutrition with excess calories. Eating candy all day will make you fat but not get you vitamin c or anything helpful. Starving to death while being too fat to move is coming
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IntactivistMama
by on Jan. 26, 2013 at 10:25 AM
I'm saddened by the number of obese (and shit, morbidly obese) children I regularly see.

I also feel that the weight percentile system doctors use for children is skewed due to how many children are overweight/obese.
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btamilee
by Silver Member on Jan. 26, 2013 at 10:40 AM
2 moms liked this

Its so much more than just weight.  I work with teenagers everyday who are *skinny*, but not necessarily...healthy.  They can fit into a size 2 jeans, and wear tiny little outfits...BUT..they can't run a mile, or do a push up.  They live on Doritos and soda, and rarely eat salads or fruit.  I see this as being a huge problem, that eventually....will catch up with them.  As a 50 year old woman, I know that I want to look good, I want to be at a healthy weight, and I am willing to do what is necessary to remain healthy.  The bestway do that is to try to eat healthy, but the most important part of the equation.....is exercise!  I would much rather be able to walk up three flights of stairs without being out of breath, then to fit into a size 2.  I would much rather be able to do 20 push ups, than fit into a teeny weeny bikini.  This is a message that I wish more teens could understand..

Debmomto2girls
by Debbie on Jan. 26, 2013 at 10:46 AM

 My oldest dd has always been a "big" kid.  From birth she topped the charts.  She is almost 15 now and wears a size 10 shoe, D cup bra and is 5'8".  She is not petite.  However, she is a dancer and is very muscular.  Her stomach has always bothered her.  She is very active but her problem has always been portion control.  I have used weight watchers for years. She asked me if she could do it and I finally relented and let her.  Her energy level is even better and she says she feels better.  It is teaching her how to eat and portion control.  I have no problem with her concern for her weight or the fact she wants to do something healthy about it.  I have no fear it is going to throw her into an eating disaorder because she isn't doing any drastic.

lizzielouaf
by Gold Member on Jan. 26, 2013 at 10:53 AM
2 moms liked this

It bothers me tremendously when I hear a parent comment about how their child is overweight. Who controls the food that walks through that front door? Who pays for their food? Who allows that child to sit idle all weekend sitting in front of some sort of technology? Not the school system or President Obama or the other kids on the playground...the parent(s).

Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Jan. 26, 2013 at 10:57 AM


Food Stamps and Obesity

Diane M. Gibson

Diane M. Gibson is an associate professor and director of the New York Census Research Data Center at Baruch College.

Updated September 28, 2011, 12:17 AM

Forty-two percent of low-income women in the United States are obese, and the rate of obesity is even higher among women who participate in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program -- formerly the food stamp program.

More supermarkets in poor neighborhoods might not change people's diets, if they only make more junk food available.

Researchers have spent a lot of time trying to figure out whether this is the result of receiving SNAP benefits or whether there is simply a correlation between obesity and SNAP participation that arises because the low-income women who are more likely to be obese are also those most interested in getting SNAP benefits. The research suggests that SNAP participation may actually cause an increase in the likelihood of obesity for low-income women. A relationship between SNAP participation and obesity has not been found for low-income men.

It is often assumed that increasing the availability of supermarkets in low-income areas will lead to more nutritious food choices and healthier weight status for SNAP participants. Although increasing the number of supermarkets in low-income areas would be expected to lower the price that low-income families pay for food, it is not clear that more supermarkets lead to better food choices or lower the rate of obesity among low-income individuals.

While supermarkets tend to stock more and better-quality fruits and vegetables than other types of stores, supermarkets also tend to have more shelf space devoted to “junk” food than other types of stores. More research is needed to understand the impact of the neighborhood food environment on food choices.

Possible ways to encourage SNAP recipients to consume fewer calories and improve diet quality include expanding the number of farmer’s markets where food stamp benefits are accepted, providing discounted produce for participants and not allowing certain types of food to be purchased with the benefits. A study is under way in Massachusetts looking at whether giving SNAP recipients a discount on produce leads to more nutritious food choices. It would have been interesting to see whether Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s proposal to prevent New York City’s SNAP participants from using their benefits to buy soda and other sugary drinks would have had an impact on the total calorie consumption and overall diet quality of the recipients.

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