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In our Obsession to Combat Childhood Obesity

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Child eating disorders on the rise

By Cindy Harb, Special to CNN
updated 6:59 AM EDT, Wed August 22, 2012

Fat is the new ugly on the playground

A study conducted by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality showed that hospitalizations for eating disorders in children under 12 increased by 119% between 1999 and 2006. More recent numbers are unavailable, but experts say the problem isn't getting any better.

Children will come in to her office already showing signs of malnutrition, dietician Page Love says. They often have low energy levels and low iron counts and are reporting hair loss because of their extreme weight loss.

Most, like Smith, do not recognize that their restrictive habits are actually an eating disorder that could ultimately be fatal.

Dina Zeckhausen is a psychologist and founder of the Eating Disorder Information Network. She sees kids in third and fourth grade who are already worried about being fat.

"There is so much emphasis on obesity," Zeckhausen said, "that there's a danger that we are going to produce a lot of anxieties in kids around weight."

Zeckhausen says that starting overweight kids on diets can trigger an obsession with food that could lead to an eating disorder.

by on Jan. 26, 2013 at 7:55 AM
Replies (31-40):
EireLass
by Ruby Member on Jan. 26, 2013 at 11:30 AM

When my kids were growing, we ate pretty much the same way I still eat. Healthy above all else. We never chose 'fat free' or 'low fat' foods. We ate whole foods, minimal prepared foods. My kids were never skinny. My daughter remarked recently, that she was the one who wasn't the stick skinny girl in her circle of friends. She was much shorter, and solid muscle. The emphasis was not on body appearance. She was extremely active. Now as adults, they're both overweight. They don't eat my food, they both work alot of hours in their fields, alot of sitting, eating for convenience.

Ms.KitKat
by Platinum Member on Jan. 26, 2013 at 2:14 PM

 

Child eating disorders on the rise - CNN.com

 
This is probably not "clicky" but that's the best I could do. This is the article from which this op is an excerpt.
Quoting Woodbabe:


Quoting Ms.KitKat:

 

Quoting Woodbabe:

I wouldn't be so obsessive about them getting an eating disorder that I'd NOT put them on a diet...of real food, education and exercise.

If we stopped worrying so much about damaging these kids and present them with real information and genuine help, we might be able to save an entire generation of kids from an early death and miserable life.

 I am sure "you" would not act in such a way but it is startling, to me that there is a sharp rise in eating disorders when all the media seems to promote is how fat our kids are.

Can you link me to some stats showing that eating disorders have recently spiked because of this?

 

Ms.KitKat
by Platinum Member on Jan. 26, 2013 at 2:16 PM

 I never said "more" ; I simply stated there is a rise. A rise of 119% in 7 years. I find that significant.

Quoting Woodbabe:

More than those dying of obesity related disease/illness?

Quoting Ms.KitKat:

 That is not what I am saying at all. However, just watching televsion this morning- I have heard countless times about ways to get thin, ways to stay thin, exercise, low-fat foods, several diet programs were advertised, etc....... And of course a show on prime time "Biggest Loser."

Perhaps it is also prudent to discuss and consider the negative repercussions to our fat obsessed society- that people are dying of self-inflicted starvation.


 

rfurlongg
by on Jan. 26, 2013 at 2:19 PM

While the scenarios you described are unquestionably embarressing, they are also undeniably true. I feel that is where the article lacking. Where do you go from here? There is clearly an epidemic, and we do not want to cause emotional damage. Unfortunately,the options are dire whichever way we choose. Do nothing and die young of obesity related ailments or do something and appear callous and increase emotional ailments. 

Quoting brookiecookie87:

I imagine you can youtube it. I remember seeing one where there was a chubby girl sitting in a chair while the skinny kids were playing outside and it talked about how she can't play because she couldn't keep up..

And there was another one that targted the parent showing two chubby kids eating food talking about how much their parents can eat. And that one day they will be able to eat twice as much (As the parent walks up with a try of fast food).

I actually avoided the other topic as well.

Quoting rfurlongg:

What commercials? Perhaps the focus should be on those advertisers and not the public discussion of positive health choices.
I saw the title of the other thread and purposely avoided it.


Quoting brookiecookie87:

 Tv. They have commercials now that use fat shaming.

And people are even suggesting we use it:

http://www.cafemom.com/group/99198/forums/read/17961456/Fat_shaming_may_curb_obesity_bioethicist_says


Quoting rfurlongg:

Where are people using shame on a mass scale? Honest question. We do not watch tv. Certainly at my children's school the focus is on health and not shaming.



Quoting brookiecookie87:


The Solution is pretty simple. Educate kids about healthy foods and give them activities to do.

The problem we are seeing is because people want to use shame. When you use shame to try and fight the problem you will get teenagers (Maybe even kids) who develop eating disorders



Quoting rfurlongg:

Teaching healthy eating habits starts early. However, for those children that do become obese at young ages how do we as a society help them loose weight without instigating further health issues? The article presents a problem, but no solution.











Ms.KitKat
by Platinum Member on Jan. 26, 2013 at 2:25 PM

 It is everywhere- not just on commercials. My local grocery store has a nutrionist now! Unheard of! and conducts classes on healthy living. The push in this society has always been to be thin. Look at our role models- they are either thin- super thin, anorexic or on a diet. Obestity is an eating disorder. It only stands to reason that the pendulum can swing to anorexia/bulimia.

Quoting rfurlongg:

What commercials? Perhaps the focus should be on those advertisers and not the public discussion of positive health choices.
I saw the title of the other thread and purposely avoided it.


Quoting brookiecookie87:

 Tv. They have commercials now that use fat shaming.

And people are even suggesting we use it:

http://www.cafemom.com/group/99198/forums/read/17961456/Fat_shaming_may_curb_obesity_bioethicist_says


Quoting rfurlongg:

Where are people using shame on a mass scale? Honest question. We do not watch tv. Certainly at my children's school the focus is on health and not shaming.



Quoting brookiecookie87:

 

The Solution is pretty simple. Educate kids about healthy foods and give them activities to do.

The problem we are seeing is because people want to use shame. When you use shame to try and fight the problem you will get teenagers (Maybe even kids) who develop eating disorders



Quoting rfurlongg:

Teaching healthy eating habits starts early. However, for those children that do become obese at young ages how do we as a society help them loose weight without instigating further health issues? The article presents a problem, but no solution.

 



 

 


 

 

rfurlongg
by on Jan. 26, 2013 at 2:36 PM

Yes, of course. And if would be a diservice to say that anorexia and bulimia are not valid and extremely dangerous disorders in their own right. That goes back precisely to my pt in my first reply. How do we remedy this? The article presents a problem and no solution. 


I have been to several healthy living seminars and the focus was not on thinness, but rather on healthy lifestyle choices.

Quoting Ms.KitKat:

 It is everywhere- not just on commercials. My local grocery store has a nutrionist now! Unheard of! and conducts classes on healthy living. The push in this society has always been to be thin. Look at our role models- they are either thin- super thin, anorexic or on a diet. Obestity is an eating disorder. It only stands to reason that the pendulum can swing to anorexia/bulimia.

Quoting rfurlongg:

What commercials? Perhaps the focus should be on those advertisers and not the public discussion of positive health choices.
I saw the title of the other thread and purposely avoided it.


Quoting brookiecookie87:

 Tv. They have commercials now that use fat shaming.

And people are even suggesting we use it:

http://www.cafemom.com/group/99198/forums/read/17961456/Fat_shaming_may_curb_obesity_bioethicist_says


Quoting rfurlongg:

Where are people using shame on a mass scale? Honest question. We do not watch tv. Certainly at my children's school the focus is on health and not shaming.



Quoting brookiecookie87:


The Solution is pretty simple. Educate kids about healthy foods and give them activities to do.

The problem we are seeing is because people want to use shame. When you use shame to try and fight the problem you will get teenagers (Maybe even kids) who develop eating disorders



Quoting rfurlongg:

Teaching healthy eating habits starts early. However, for those children that do become obese at young ages how do we as a society help them loose weight without instigating further health issues? The article presents a problem, but no solution.








 


brookiecookie87
by Platinum Member on Jan. 26, 2013 at 3:05 PM
1 mom liked this

This is a false ultimatum. The only two options are NOT do nothing or shame fat people.

There are ways to promote healthy eating, healthy activities and breaking bad habits without shaming the people in the process. The alternative to fat shaming is NOT do nothing.

There are really countless ways to go about making change. From offering healthier foods at school, limiting the availability of unhealthy foods, overweight school programs that help overweight kids diet and exercise, programs that teach the parents what they can do. Offering incentives for kids to live more healthier. Taxing unhealthy fast food places and using the money for health programs. Some of these ideas are better than others and some are pretty bad. But the point is-There are a LOT of ways we can make change. And the answer doesn't just have to be one choice.


Quoting rfurlongg:

While the scenarios you described are unquestionably embarressing, they are also undeniably true. I feel that is where the article lacking. Where do you go from here? There is clearly an epidemic, and we do not want to cause emotional damage. Unfortunately,the options are dire whichever way we choose. Do nothing and die young of obesity related ailments or do something and appear callous and increase emotional ailments. 

Quoting brookiecookie87:

I imagine you can youtube it. I remember seeing one where there was a chubby girl sitting in a chair while the skinny kids were playing outside and it talked about how she can't play because she couldn't keep up..

And there was another one that targted the parent showing two chubby kids eating food talking about how much their parents can eat. And that one day they will be able to eat twice as much (As the parent walks up with a try of fast food).

I actually avoided the other topic as well.

Quoting rfurlongg:

What commercials? Perhaps the focus should be on those advertisers and not the public discussion of positive health choices.
I saw the title of the other thread and purposely avoided it.


Quoting brookiecookie87:

 Tv. They have commercials now that use fat shaming.

And people are even suggesting we use it:

http://www.cafemom.com/group/99198/forums/read/17961456/Fat_shaming_may_curb_obesity_bioethicist_says


Quoting rfurlongg:

Where are people using shame on a mass scale? Honest question. We do not watch tv. Certainly at my children's school the focus is on health and not shaming.



Quoting brookiecookie87:


The Solution is pretty simple. Educate kids about healthy foods and give them activities to do.

The problem we are seeing is because people want to use shame. When you use shame to try and fight the problem you will get teenagers (Maybe even kids) who develop eating disorders



Quoting rfurlongg:

Teaching healthy eating habits starts early. However, for those children that do become obese at young ages how do we as a society help them loose weight without instigating further health issues? The article presents a problem, but no solution.













Join us on the 99% Moms group!
The Ninety-Nine Percent Moms   

If they enforced bank regulations like they do park rules, we wouldn't be in this mess

rfurlongg
by on Jan. 26, 2013 at 3:36 PM

That is not in the slightest what I said. I did not even talk about shaming, and neither did the article. The article claims "obsession" in talking about obesity leading to other eating disorders. My point throughout this thread has been we cannot stop talking about it because it an epidemic. The article presents a problem : taking (not shaming) about obesity leads to increase in eating disorders at the other end of the spectrum. The article stops there. So if talking (not shaming) about childhood obesity leads to another ailment, what is the solution? 

Quoting brookiecookie87:

This is a false ultimatum. The only two options are NOT do nothing or shame fat people.

There are ways to promote healthy eating, healthy activities and breaking bad habits without shaming the people in the process. The alternative to fat shaming is NOT do nothing.

There are really countless ways to go about making change. From offering healthier foods at school, limiting the availability of unhealthy foods, overweight school programs that help overweight kids diet and exercise, programs that teach the parents what they can do. Offering incentives for kids to live more healthier. Taxing unhealthy fast food places and using the money for health programs. Some of these ideas are better than others and some are pretty bad. But the point is-There are a LOT of ways we can make change. And the answer doesn't just have to be one choice.


Quoting rfurlongg:

While the scenarios you described are unquestionably embarressing, they are also undeniably true. I feel that is where the article lacking. Where do you go from here? There is clearly an epidemic, and we do not want to cause emotional damage. Unfortunately,the options are dire whichever way we choose. Do nothing and die young of obesity related ailments or do something and appear callous and increase emotional ailments. 

Quoting brookiecookie87:

I imagine you can youtube it. I remember seeing one where there was a chubby girl sitting in a chair while the skinny kids were playing outside and it talked about how she can't play because she couldn't keep up..

And there was another one that targted the parent showing two chubby kids eating food talking about how much their parents can eat. And that one day they will be able to eat twice as much (As the parent walks up with a try of fast food).

I actually avoided the other topic as well.

Quoting rfurlongg:

What commercials? Perhaps the focus should be on those advertisers and not the public discussion of positive health choices.
I saw the title of the other thread and purposely avoided it.


Quoting brookiecookie87:

 Tv. They have commercials now that use fat shaming.

And people are even suggesting we use it:

http://www.cafemom.com/group/99198/forums/read/17961456/Fat_shaming_may_curb_obesity_bioethicist_says


Quoting rfurlongg:

Where are people using shame on a mass scale? Honest question. We do not watch tv. Certainly at my children's school the focus is on health and not shaming.



Quoting brookiecookie87:


The Solution is pretty simple. Educate kids about healthy foods and give them activities to do.

The problem we are seeing is because people want to use shame. When you use shame to try and fight the problem you will get teenagers (Maybe even kids) who develop eating disorders



Quoting rfurlongg:

Teaching healthy eating habits starts early. However, for those children that do become obese at young ages how do we as a society help them loose weight without instigating further health issues? The article presents a problem, but no solution.














TranquilMind
by Platinum Member on Jan. 26, 2013 at 3:50 PM
1 mom liked this

You can't put a kid on a diet.  The whole family has to change its poor eating habits so that good food seems natural, not a punishment.

brookiecookie87
by Platinum Member on Jan. 26, 2013 at 4:11 PM

I brought up shaming in my first response to your post.  When it comes to kids feeling ashamed of their weight and trying to change it themselves without the wisdom or patience to diet, eat healthy or exercise long-term fat shaming is probably the greatest pusher (In my opinion).

If you sat down with someone and told them about the health problems they might run into they won't feel shamed to being in a disorder. No kid yells at another kid, "Ha ha! You will probably be diabetic!". No kid goes home, alone, and depressed thinking, "No one wants to be my friend because I might have a heart attack sooner than they will".

No kid looks at their parents and thinks, "I need to stop eating right now or else in the future I will be susceptible to certain kinds of cancer".

Talking about the issue does not cause any of these thoughts are problems. Commercials that makes them or others ashamed of obesity will.

I agree with you (at least the point I think you are making) That we shouldn't stop talking about the issue. It needs to be talked about. But I am just saying fat shaming is not the way.


Quote:

Zeckhausen says that starting overweight kids on diets can trigger an obsession with food that could lead to an eating disorder.

This quote seems to be the problem. Unless Zeckhausen has done studies/research I doubt his comment checks out. If he added, "Showing overweight kids that a diet can help them and then having kids taunt him, and the media trying to guilt him (or her) the diet might then might  trigger an obession with food that could lead to an eating disorder".

I don't believe just focusing on the issue will trigger these eating disorder in the average obese kid.
Quoting rfurlongg:

That is not in the slightest what I said. I did not even talk about shaming, and neither did the article. The article claims "obsession" in talking about obesity leading to other eating disorders. My point throughout this thread has been we cannot stop talking about it because it an epidemic. The article presents a problem : taking (not shaming) about obesity leads to increase in eating disorders at the other end of the spectrum. The article stops there. So if talking (not shaming) about childhood obesity leads to another ailment, what is the solution? 

Quoting brookiecookie87:

This is a false ultimatum. The only two options are NOT do nothing or shame fat people.

There are ways to promote healthy eating, healthy activities and breaking bad habits without shaming the people in the process. The alternative to fat shaming is NOT do nothing.

There are really countless ways to go about making change. From offering healthier foods at school, limiting the availability of unhealthy foods, overweight school programs that help overweight kids diet and exercise, programs that teach the parents what they can do. Offering incentives for kids to live more healthier. Taxing unhealthy fast food places and using the money for health programs. Some of these ideas are better than others and some are pretty bad. But the point is-There are a LOT of ways we can make change. And the answer doesn't just have to be one choice.


Quoting rfurlongg:

While the scenarios you described are unquestionably embarressing, they are also undeniably true. I feel that is where the article lacking. Where do you go from here? There is clearly an epidemic, and we do not want to cause emotional damage. Unfortunately,the options are dire whichever way we choose. Do nothing and die young of obesity related ailments or do something and appear callous and increase emotional ailments. 

Quoting brookiecookie87:

I imagine you can youtube it. I remember seeing one where there was a chubby girl sitting in a chair while the skinny kids were playing outside and it talked about how she can't play because she couldn't keep up..

And there was another one that targted the parent showing two chubby kids eating food talking about how much their parents can eat. And that one day they will be able to eat twice as much (As the parent walks up with a try of fast food).

I actually avoided the other topic as well.

Quoting rfurlongg:

What commercials? Perhaps the focus should be on those advertisers and not the public discussion of positive health choices.
I saw the title of the other thread and purposely avoided it.


Quoting brookiecookie87:

 Tv. They have commercials now that use fat shaming.

And people are even suggesting we use it:

http://www.cafemom.com/group/99198/forums/read/17961456/Fat_shaming_may_curb_obesity_bioethicist_says


Quoting rfurlongg:

Where are people using shame on a mass scale? Honest question. We do not watch tv. Certainly at my children's school the focus is on health and not shaming.



Quoting brookiecookie87:


The Solution is pretty simple. Educate kids about healthy foods and give them activities to do.

The problem we are seeing is because people want to use shame. When you use shame to try and fight the problem you will get teenagers (Maybe even kids) who develop eating disorders



Quoting rfurlongg:

Teaching healthy eating habits starts early. However, for those children that do become obese at young ages how do we as a society help them loose weight without instigating further health issues? The article presents a problem, but no solution.
















Join us on the 99% Moms group!
The Ninety-Nine Percent Moms   

If they enforced bank regulations like they do park rules, we wouldn't be in this mess

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