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In our Obsession to Combat Childhood Obesity

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Child eating disorders on the rise

By Cindy Harb, Special to CNN
updated 6:59 AM EDT, Wed August 22, 2012

Fat is the new ugly on the playground

A study conducted by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality showed that hospitalizations for eating disorders in children under 12 increased by 119% between 1999 and 2006. More recent numbers are unavailable, but experts say the problem isn't getting any better.

Children will come in to her office already showing signs of malnutrition, dietician Page Love says. They often have low energy levels and low iron counts and are reporting hair loss because of their extreme weight loss.

Most, like Smith, do not recognize that their restrictive habits are actually an eating disorder that could ultimately be fatal.

Dina Zeckhausen is a psychologist and founder of the Eating Disorder Information Network. She sees kids in third and fourth grade who are already worried about being fat.

"There is so much emphasis on obesity," Zeckhausen said, "that there's a danger that we are going to produce a lot of anxieties in kids around weight."

Zeckhausen says that starting overweight kids on diets can trigger an obsession with food that could lead to an eating disorder.

by on Jan. 26, 2013 at 7:55 AM
Replies (41-50):
Ms.KitKat
by Platinum Member on Jan. 26, 2013 at 6:05 PM

 Just because the article is not offering solutions does not mean the topic is not worthy of discussion of the problem. Did you know that eating disorder rates are on the rise? How can we have a solution(s) if we are not even aware that is a problem to begin with?  

Quoting rfurlongg:

Yes, of course. And if would be a diservice to say that anorexia and bulimia are not valid and extremely dangerous disorders in their own right. That goes back precisely to my pt in my first reply. How do we remedy this? The article presents a problem and no solution. 

 

I have been to several healthy living seminars and the focus was not on thinness, but rather on healthy lifestyle choices.

Quoting Ms.KitKat:

 It is everywhere- not just on commercials. My local grocery store has a nutrionist now! Unheard of! and conducts classes on healthy living. The push in this society has always been to be thin. Look at our role models- they are either thin- super thin, anorexic or on a diet. Obestity is an eating disorder. It only stands to reason that the pendulum can swing to anorexia/bulimia.

Quoting rfurlongg:

What commercials? Perhaps the focus should be on those advertisers and not the public discussion of positive health choices.
I saw the title of the other thread and purposely avoided it.


Quoting brookiecookie87:

 Tv. They have commercials now that use fat shaming.

And people are even suggesting we use it:

http://www.cafemom.com/group/99198/forums/read/17961456/Fat_shaming_may_curb_obesity_bioethicist_says


Quoting rfurlongg:

Where are people using shame on a mass scale? Honest question. We do not watch tv. Certainly at my children's school the focus is on health and not shaming.



Quoting brookiecookie87:

 

The Solution is pretty simple. Educate kids about healthy foods and give them activities to do.

The problem we are seeing is because people want to use shame. When you use shame to try and fight the problem you will get teenagers (Maybe even kids) who develop eating disorders



Quoting rfurlongg:

Teaching healthy eating habits starts early. However, for those children that do become obese at young ages how do we as a society help them loose weight without instigating further health issues? The article presents a problem, but no solution.

 



 

 


 

 


 

rfurlongg
by on Jan. 26, 2013 at 8:41 PM
No where did I say it was not a worthy topic of discussion. No where.

Quoting Ms.KitKat:

 Just because the article is not offering solutions does not mean the topic is not worthy of discussion of the problem. Did you know that eating disorder rates are on the rise? How can we have a solution(s) if we are not even aware that is a problem to begin with?  


Quoting rfurlongg:


Yes, of course. And if would be a diservice to say that anorexia and bulimia are not valid and extremely dangerous disorders in their own right. That goes back precisely to my pt in my first reply. How do we remedy this? The article presents a problem and no solution. 


 


I have been to several healthy living seminars and the focus was not on thinness, but rather on healthy lifestyle choices.


Quoting Ms.KitKat:


 It is everywhere- not just on commercials. My local grocery store has a nutrionist now! Unheard of! and conducts classes on healthy living. The push in this society has always been to be thin. Look at our role models- they are either thin- super thin, anorexic or on a diet. Obestity is an eating disorder. It only stands to reason that the pendulum can swing to anorexia/bulimia.


Quoting rfurlongg:

What commercials? Perhaps the focus should be on those advertisers and not the public discussion of positive health choices.
I saw the title of the other thread and purposely avoided it.




Quoting brookiecookie87:


 Tv. They have commercials now that use fat shaming.

And people are even suggesting we use it:

http://www.cafemom.com/group/99198/forums/read/17961456/Fat_shaming_may_curb_obesity_bioethicist_says



Quoting rfurlongg:

Where are people using shame on a mass scale? Honest question. We do not watch tv. Certainly at my children's school the focus is on health and not shaming.




Quoting brookiecookie87:


 


The Solution is pretty simple. Educate kids about healthy foods and give them activities to do.

The problem we are seeing is because people want to use shame. When you use shame to try and fight the problem you will get teenagers (Maybe even kids) who develop eating disorders




Quoting rfurlongg:

Teaching healthy eating habits starts early. However, for those children that do become obese at young ages how do we as a society help them loose weight without instigating further health issues? The article presents a problem, but no solution.

 




 


 



 


 




 

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LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Jan. 26, 2013 at 9:03 PM

This is not new.

The fat kids (both of them) that I went to school with were ragged ceaselessly about their weight.

JP-StrongForTwo
by on Jan. 26, 2013 at 9:16 PM

When my DD started showing signs of pushing the weight limit for her height, I didnt make any comments about weight, or how it was important. 

I simply started feeding her healthier foods, limiting her time on TV and video games and encouraging GOOD habits, rather than discouraging BAD habits. 


jaxTheMomm
by Platinum Member on Jan. 26, 2013 at 9:21 PM

I can see how an increased awareness might create problems, but could it be that with more obesity, comes more teasing among children?

I don't think that being aware of this and trying to bring it to light, to encourage healthy eating and activity is a bad thing, and I don't think I'd necessarily correlate it an eating disorder, but it's certainly worth thought.

We now have the first generation of children who may not have the same longevity as their parents.  We are going to spend billions and billions in health care related costs in trying to treat the diseases that come with early obesity.

So we gotta talk about it.  Is it, though, actually causing more eating disorders?

Bookwormy
by Platinum Member on Jan. 26, 2013 at 9:36 PM

 Yes obesity is lethal, but you do know that anorexia is lethal too.  And bulimia destroys the throat & esophogus.  None of this is physically, or emotionally, healthy.  There needs to be an emphasis on healthy eating & activity, bot not on dieting.  Diets aren't healthy for children.  If they learn how to live healthy as children, hopefully they wpn't need to diet as an adult.

I'm losing weight & we are raising our DD to not need to do so as an adult.  She eats very healthy & gets lots of activity.  She is being raised very differently than I was.  And she is in the 50% in height & weight & perfectly porportioned.


Quoting Woodbabe:

I wouldn't be so obsessive about them getting an eating disorder that I'd NOT put them on a diet...of real food, education and exercise.

If we stopped worrying so much about damaging these kids and present them with real information and genuine help, we might be able to save an entire generation of kids from an early death and miserable life.


 

Hate Is NOT a Family Value.

kailu1835
by Ruby Member on Jan. 26, 2013 at 9:46 PM
So let's sit back and do nothing, and tell our kids that they are just fine the way they are... because it has worked so well in the past. Some kids need to go on a diet, they just need to do it in a healthy way.
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motha2daDuchess
by Bruja on Jan. 27, 2013 at 1:37 AM

This, I have just had this conversation with dh about his sister. As she shops for ds, she tells my dh that the baby is fat, he is going to be 2 feb 9th...SIL is comparing dd to ds. DD was born with a heart defect and at almost 5 she barely weighs 40 lbs. We choose healthy foods for the kids especially my dd barely eats what we give her, ds will eat everything we give him. We do not make them clean their plates and we do not load up on what we serve them. As soon as he turns 2 he is going to 1% milk, my dd has been on it since she turned 1. my SIL has never had kids but she has given my dh a complex(it's his older sis) and I'll be damned if she gives my son one.

Quoting brookiecookie87:


The Solution is pretty simple. Educate kids about healthy foods and give them activities to do.

The problem we are seeing is because people want to use shame. When you use shame to try and fight the problem you will get teenagers (Maybe even kids) who develop eating disorders

Quoting rfurlongg:

Teaching healthy eating habits starts early. However, for those children that do become obese at young ages how do we as a society help them loose weight without instigating further health issues? The article presents a problem, but no solution.




MeeshMom
by Member on Jan. 27, 2013 at 2:37 AM
You know what this debate doesn't address is the children who are very picky eaters. My 5 year old made a comment that he thought he was fat. Mind you he is a very lean and healthy boy but he is so picky and hardly eats his fruits and veggies. I try as best as I can. I pack him good stuff. Luckily he does eat broccoli, apples, and cantaloupe. But what do you do when your kids are having body image issues as they get older but are such picky eaters and refuse to eat healthy foods? Hmmm.
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Iconoclast
by on Jan. 27, 2013 at 2:55 AM
Like most things we missed the target but hit the tree. It isnt or shouldnt be about dwelling on weight or diets but on proper eating balanced eating. It isnt the obssession with food that's the problem its the obssession with appearances. It is all that is talked about. And there is a quick and easy obssession. Fast food, fast and easy ways to lose the weight. Most mom even on CM are hookef on finding easy weight loss tips instead of healthy choices. Every other post is a rate me post. Our vision of ourselves weighs heavily in how we preceive that othets see us.
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