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The Girl Who Got Away

Posted by on Jan. 28, 2013 at 3:34 PM
  • 43 Replies
by on Jan. 28, 2013 at 3:34 PM
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LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Jan. 28, 2013 at 3:36 PM
1 mom liked this

Gross.

All I can think of in stories like this is: where were the responsible adults in these children's lives?

I know a guy who went hitchhiking for 6 weeks when he was 14. When he got home his parents barely looked up. He thought it was 'great' that he had that much freedom. I suggested it was atrocious that no one gave a shit that he disappeared.

gammie
by on Jan. 28, 2013 at 3:37 PM

Jada Pinkett Smith: Parents Can Help Fight Sex Trafficking
We first became aware of Jada Pinkett Smith when she started appearing regularly on TV shows and films in the ’90s. Now the actress, businesswoman, mother, and wife of Will Smith is becoming known as an advocate for victims of sex trafficking. In a recent phone interview, Pinkett Smith, who cites Angelina Jolie as a mentor and inspiration, told TakePart on MSN Causes about her new work and how her growing knowledge of trafficking has made her reexamine parenting.
Q:
What first made you aware of human trafficking and sex trafficking?
A:

It was first brought to my attention by my daughter, Willow. She came to me and said, “Mommy, you know there are girls here in this country who are being sold for sex that are my age, and I really want to lend my voice to these young girls.” At first I said, “Willow, honey, that doesn’t happen here in the United States—let me just check these facts. Let me see what your reading.” I immediately got on the Internet and my world just changed from there. I had absolutely no idea that this was so prevalent in our country, and we just started a crusade.

Q:
Is there something about this issue that speaks to you more than others?
A:

For me as a mother, for me as a woman, for me as a person, I feel as though people always need to feel empowered in order for these injustices not to exist. I find that we all, no matter who we are, no matter what our economic backgrounds are, our nationalities, we all are faced with some aspect [of our lives] that makes us feel disempowered in some way. That makes every single person on the planet susceptible to an injustice like this. I just think that freedom is a universal truth. There’s not one person on the planet that doesn’t deserve to be free, that doesn’t have the right to be free, and doesn’t want to be free. This is why this particular issue is very strong for me.

Q:
Most people think there is no way that this can touch their lives. People would be surprised to know how women are lured into these rings. Can you speak to the specific ways things like this happen?
A:

A lot of predators are online. Unfortunately, you’ll get a lot of adults who are pretending to be young adults. So one of those things that I can say is parents also have to talk to our kids because you don’t know who is on the other side of that computer. As parents we have to slow down with our busy schedules, we need face time with our kids, we need to sit down have dinner and really be engaged with what’s happening in their lives.

Q:
This year you testified during a Senate hearing about the Trafficking Victims Protection Act. What was it like to be at that hearing, and how did the senators respond?
A:

It was a very powerful day. And I’ll tell you what made it most powerful: sitting with three young women who had been trafficked in our country. That was the most impactful part for our senators. Even for them, it was a little eye opening. Three beautiful young girls who are American: One who had been sold by her mother and her father; one who had been kidnapped by six men off the street; and another woman who had come from a Latin country, and is now an American citizen, who was trafficked. These women, who have actually survived these atrocities, and these men and young boys, are some of the most courageous people I’ve ever met. And so for them as well to be able to have had a voice and stand in front of Congress and speak about what has happened to them and what they see, and what they believe and why this particular Act needs to exist, and why we need more laws to protect people like them. It made it more real for everyone in the room. It was a powerful day. It made it one of my most proud moments.

Q:
What would you encourage readers to do to take part in this fight?
A:

There are a couple things I would suggest. First, if you are a parent I would study what techniques and tactics traffickers use to lure young women and boys. I would also say that people need to check the laws in their own states in regards to trafficking and see how strong or weak they are. My activism is really based around systemic change. To get really knowledgeable and continue, and tell 10 people a day about trafficking. That alone will make a big difference because lot of people are still unaware that this is something that is happening on our soil, that exists on our soil, not just in Latin America, not just in Africa, but right here in the United States. If you educate 10 people a day, you’re really doing something.


Interview has been edited and condensed.
gammie
by on Jan. 28, 2013 at 3:38 PM


How sad!

Quoting LindaClement:

Gross.

All I can think of in stories like this is: where were the responsible adults in these children's lives?

I know a guy who went hitchhiking for 6 weeks when he was 14. When he got home his parents barely looked up. He thought it was 'great' that he had that much freedom. I suggested it was atrocious that no one gave a shit that he disappeared.



LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Jan. 28, 2013 at 3:39 PM

I know!

Quoting gammie:


How sad!

Quoting LindaClement:

Gross.

All I can think of in stories like this is: where were the responsible adults in these children's lives?

I know a guy who went hitchhiking for 6 weeks when he was 14. When he got home his parents barely looked up. He thought it was 'great' that he had that much freedom. I suggested it was atrocious that no one gave a shit that he disappeared.




canadianmom1974
by Gold Member on Jan. 28, 2013 at 3:43 PM
2 moms liked this
In some cases there are neglectful or absent parents, but these pimps or sex traffickers are masters of manipulation. They are very smart, we're not talking about the stereotype of the pimp on the street, this is big business and these people are very good at what they do ... finding and exploiting whatever weakness they can.

Quoting LindaClement:

Gross.

All I can think of in stories like this is: where were the responsible adults in these children's lives?

I know a guy who went hitchhiking for 6 weeks when he was 14. When he got home his parents barely looked up. He thought it was 'great' that he had that much freedom. I suggested it was atrocious that no one gave a shit that he disappeared.

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
gammie
by on Jan. 28, 2013 at 3:47 PM

I saw a show like The Haunted they went into Seattle underground and they talked about sex trafficking that has been going there forever.

They were looking for spirits of young girls that had been killed. They talk about how it's still going on and drove around to see the young girls out on the streets. It was sad to see.

LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Jan. 28, 2013 at 3:48 PM

Which is still a questions of where the responsible adults in the childrens' lives are... 

Being a 'master manipulator' doesn't make it possible for a closely-monitored young teen to have so much time available that total strangers can get close enough to them in the first place. 

For kids whose need for attention and affection is met at home, whose friends are always welcome over, and whose parents know the parents of the houses they visit --they are not available to this.

Parents of victims of this might want something else to be true, but it's not. It's not about what might look like 'good' homes from the outside, it's about strong, loving and accepting family relationships on the inside.

Quoting canadianmom1974:

In some cases there are neglectful or absent parents, but these pimps or sex traffickers are masters of manipulation. They are very smart, we're not talking about the stereotype of the pimp on the street, this is big business and these people are very good at what they do ... finding and exploiting whatever weakness they can.

Quoting LindaClement:

Gross.

All I can think of in stories like this is: where were the responsible adults in these children's lives?

I know a guy who went hitchhiking for 6 weeks when he was 14. When he got home his parents barely looked up. He thought it was 'great' that he had that much freedom. I suggested it was atrocious that no one gave a shit that he disappeared.


gammie
by on Jan. 28, 2013 at 3:51 PM


As the story told you the girl was smart and she feel for the good looking guy who had lots of money. Young kids want to take the easy road and this is when they get into trouble. The scary part was as soon as they decided they wanted you they went after you!

Quoting LindaClement:

Which is still a questions of where the responsible adults in the childrens' lives are... 

Being a 'master manipulator' doesn't make it possible for a closely-monitored young teen to have so much time available that total strangers can get close enough to them in the first place. 

For kids whose need for attention and affection is met at home, whose friends are always welcome over, and whose parents know the parents of the houses they visit --they are not available to this.

Parents of victims of this might want something else to be true, but it's not. It's not about what might look like 'good' homes from the outside, it's about strong, loving and accepting family relationships on the inside.

Quoting canadianmom1974:

In some cases there are neglectful or absent parents, but these pimps or sex traffickers are masters of manipulation. They are very smart, we're not talking about the stereotype of the pimp on the street, this is big business and these people are very good at what they do ... finding and exploiting whatever weakness they can.

Quoting LindaClement:

Gross.

All I can think of in stories like this is: where were the responsible adults in these children's lives?

I know a guy who went hitchhiking for 6 weeks when he was 14. When he got home his parents barely looked up. He thought it was 'great' that he had that much freedom. I suggested it was atrocious that no one gave a shit that he disappeared.




pamelax3
by Gold Member on Jan. 28, 2013 at 4:01 PM
1 mom liked this

this is so scary.. I just wish parents would pay more attention to their teenagers, maybe some of this crap would stop

canadianmom1974
by Gold Member on Jan. 28, 2013 at 4:22 PM
4 moms liked this
And then we have the overly 'closely monitored' teen who rebels against their parents by running away.

There isn't an easy answer to 'where are the parents?' It's easy to blame parents, and certainly in some cases they are to blame, but in the case of the op, she had a great, caring, loving, affectionate home. She was in a relatively safe place (her work), exchanging small talk with a who she thought was a 'safe' person (married man she got to know over time). Nothing to raise any red flags.

He knew how to get the info he needed without raising suspicion. And when he did become weird or inappropriate, she was smart and turned him down. But then her 'dream guy' walked in the door - with no apparent connection to the (now) creepy guy.

It's not like he walked in and told her to get on her knees and blow him, he charmed her, he probably would and could have charmed her family too. Small steps, tiny little steps down a crooked road. It's like domestic abuse, it's not like the abuser beats his victim on the first date, it's a process of separating the victim from their support system.

This is a societal problem. There is a demand and unscrupulous people will do what they can to fill that demand to give themselves the greatest profit.


Quoting LindaClement:

Which is still a questions of where the responsible adults in the childrens' lives are... 

Being a 'master manipulator' doesn't make it possible for a closely-monitored young teen to have so much time available that total strangers can get close enough to them in the first place. 

For kids whose need for attention and affection is met at home, whose friends are always welcome over, and whose parents know the parents of the houses they visit --they are not available to this.

Parents of victims of this might want something else to be true, but it's not. It's not about what might look like 'good' homes from the outside, it's about strong, loving and accepting family relationships on the inside.

Quoting canadianmom1974:

In some cases there are neglectful or absent parents, but these pimps or sex traffickers are masters of manipulation. They are very smart, we're not talking about the stereotype of the pimp on the street, this is big business and these people are very good at what they do ... finding and exploiting whatever weakness they can.



Quoting LindaClement:

Gross.

All I can think of in stories like this is: where were the responsible adults in these children's lives?

I know a guy who went hitchhiking for 6 weeks when he was 14. When he got home his parents barely looked up. He thought it was 'great' that he had that much freedom. I suggested it was atrocious that no one gave a shit that he disappeared.


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