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What do you think is an acceptable amount?

 I have a 1st grader and she gets one math worksheet and 20 minutes of reading nightly, plus spelling tests weekly.  I actually don't think it is enough, she whizzes through the math so quick.  She always reads anyway.  She gets the spelling words right after a quick review and practice test.  I bought her some math workbooks that are more challenging, and I have her do a page or two of that.

Is it because she is so young that she doesn't seem really challenged by the assigned work? (Meaning they wouldn't give her much.)

Or am I cursing myself and she will be overwhelmed in the future?

by on Jan. 28, 2013 at 9:22 PM
Replies (21-30):
stacymomof2
by Ruby Member on Jan. 28, 2013 at 10:52 PM

True enough, wait 'till she hits long division.  lol

She's little still, I know.

Quoting FromAtoZ:

Give her time, she will find herself challenged. :)

That is about what my girls had at that age.  



IAMmomtotrips
by Member on Jan. 28, 2013 at 10:58 PM
My girls are in kindergarten...

They have 20 minutes of reading
Practice phonics story three times
Review popcorn words

Practice writing (and all three of mine have fine motor issues, so this can take anywhere from 15-30 minutes)

Do the numbers to 100 by 1s, 5s, and 10s...

Then they have two computer programs that the do three times a week.

Their popcorn word activities and their daily activity that can range from calling a friend, find the letter J in a book, or count the number of beds in your house...

It's anywhere from 45 minutes to an hour! It's killing me!
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stacymomof2
by Ruby Member on Jan. 28, 2013 at 10:58 PM

Yes we do all kinds of fun stuff.  She has a chemistry set, we read alound to each other, and we play outside in the snow, too.  I'm thinking about scouts but still wavering.  I have a pretty tight schedule and I work full time so I hate to have her off and gone every night for one thing or another, especially since I have to drive her.

Quoting MentorMom1:

Your little girl probably has enough homework for her age and grade. She sounds very bright, and of course you want to challenge her.

I would say let sleeping dogs lie. For now. Reading to your daughter aloud is also important (which you probably do!). When you read books that are more difficult, above her reading level, she is getting more vocabulary, which improves her reading and comprehension.

I would involve her in home activities after she does her homework. Or before -however you do it. At her age, it's important to have family time, time to be together and enjoy the warmth of home.  If you crochet or knit, those are excellent skills to teach her. Or scrapbooking, or sewing, or taking a walk and just talking.

All the incidental knowledge she picks up from activities like these are invaluable. When my older daughter was in first grade I became a Girl Scout Leader. Our Brownie troop worked on badges, and that was wonderful learning for both of my girls. Kids can learn a whole lot outside of school. Cultural knowledge is what a lot of children lack.

Remember that homework is not supposed to be new learning. It's supposed to be practice for what has already been taught. However, having said all that, you may be entirely right that her work isn't challenging her. It doesn't have to be more, quantity-wise, to be more challenging. You could talk to her teacher about it. Does she recommend testing her for "gifted and talented?"

Also, there's nothing that says you can't skip ahead and teach her more. Teach her cursive handwriting. Teach her Roman numerals. Teach her Aesop's Fables and help her decide what the moral is. Together you can make a "book" of drawings that illustrates the morals on one side or page, and on the other, have her print out the moral boiled down to a few sentences on lined paper.

You can teach her the state capital song, and make up geography games. There's so much you can do to expand her mind. Just don't worry that she'll be too far ahead. You know your kid. You know what's best for her.



glitterteaz
by Ruby Member on Jan. 28, 2013 at 11:00 PM

they spend 8 hours at school they need time at home to be kids relax


stacymomof2
by Ruby Member on Jan. 28, 2013 at 11:02 PM

I actually think the kindergarten homework was tougher, at least on me.  It was more like "have your mother show you how to...."

It did take us a long time.  I imagine with three it is even more of a challenge.

On the other hand, how lovely to have three little girls!  :D  They must get a lot of attention.

Quoting IAMmomtotrips:

My girls are in kindergarten...

They have 20 minutes of reading
Practice phonics story three times
Review popcorn words

Practice writing (and all three of mine have fine motor issues, so this can take anywhere from 15-30 minutes)

Do the numbers to 100 by 1s, 5s, and 10s...

Then they have two computer programs that the do three times a week.

Their popcorn word activities and their daily activity that can range from calling a friend, find the letter J in a book, or count the number of beds in your house...

It's anywhere from 45 minutes to an hour! It's killing me!


stacymomof2
by Ruby Member on Jan. 28, 2013 at 11:05 PM

OK!  lol

They do get time to be kids.  They built a snow castle today after Spanish class.  Plus they still found time to sit in front of the idiot box.

Quoting glitterteaz:

they spend 8 hours at school they need time at home to be kids relax



glitterteaz
by Ruby Member on Jan. 28, 2013 at 11:29 PM
1 mom liked this

that's their jobs!!! trust me they pile more on them the older they get

Quoting stacymomof2:

OK!  lol

They do get time to be kids.  They built a snow castle today after Spanish class.  Plus they still found time to sit in front of the idiot box.

Quoting glitterteaz:

they spend 8 hours at school they need time at home to be kids relax




MomofaGamer
by New Member on Jan. 29, 2013 at 12:17 AM
1 mom liked this

Couldn't agree more. Especially re: "play is an important part of development, as is family time." Sometimes the things that are difficult to measure, like the benefits of play, freetime, and social time with family and friends gets loses to our desire to make sure our kids are optimizing their education experience. 


Quoting Maevelyn:

I personally don't think kids that little should have too much homework. I think of it like this. School is their job and yes, many of us have to take work home with us from time to time. However, kids should have time to relax, unwind and absorb their day. Play is an important part of development, as is family time. Too much homework adds extra stress to kids and parents and can make it feel like the school day doesn't end. 



MomofaGamer
by New Member on Jan. 29, 2013 at 12:24 AM

I heart you MentorMom1! Will you coparent with me?! :P 


Quoting MentorMom1:

Your little girl probably has enough homework for her age and grade. She sounds very bright, and of course you want to challenge her.

I would say let sleeping dogs lie. For now. Reading to your daughter aloud is also important (which you probably do!). When you read books that are more difficult, above her reading level, she is getting more vocabulary, which improves her reading and comprehension.

I would involve her in home activities after she does her homework. Or before -however you do it. At her age, it's important to have family time, time to be together and enjoy the warmth of home.  If you crochet or knit, those are excellent skills to teach her. Or scrapbooking, or sewing, or taking a walk and just talking.

All the incidental knowledge she picks up from activities like these are invaluable. When my older daughter was in first grade I became a Girl Scout Leader. Our Brownie troop worked on badges, and that was wonderful learning for both of my girls. Kids can learn a whole lot outside of school. Cultural knowledge is what a lot of children lack.

Remember that homework is not supposed to be new learning. It's supposed to be practice for what has already been taught. However, having said all that, you may be entirely right that her work isn't challenging her. It doesn't have to be more, quantity-wise, to be more challenging. You could talk to her teacher about it. Does she recommend testing her for "gifted and talented?"

Also, there's nothing that says you can't skip ahead and teach her more. Teach her cursive handwriting. Teach her Roman numerals. Teach her Aesop's Fables and help her decide what the moral is. Together you can make a "book" of drawings that illustrates the morals on one side or page, and on the other, have her print out the moral boiled down to a few sentences on lined paper.

You can teach her the state capital song, and make up geography games. There's so much you can do to expand her mind. Just don't worry that she'll be too far ahead. You know your kid. You know what's best for her.




TranquilMind
by Platinum Member on Jan. 29, 2013 at 12:31 AM

I don't think kids that age need any homework at all, personally.   Homeschoolers don't have to mess with that.  Two gifted kids, working years ahead of typical in their stronger areas.  Oldest is in a third year college class in one subject.

It didn't hurt them, obviously, not to have busywork at an early age. 

See, this is the problem.  I don't know the level of the material you are being given, but your child obviously can handle a higher level.  Someone else's kid will not be able to .  The class will move at a pace that only suits a few.  The rest will be bored out of their mind, or hopelessly lost.  This is why I am not a one-size-fits-all education fan. 

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