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New York City’s Teen Pregnancy Rate Plummeted After High Schools Expanded Access To Plan B

New York City’s Teen Pregnancy Rate Plummeted After High Schools Expanded Access To Plan B

The teen pregnancy rate in New York City dropped by 27 percent over the last decade, a statistic that city officials credit to teens’ expanded access to contraception.

The city’s health commissioner, Tom Farley, told the New York Daily News that the data shows two concurrent trends: more adolescents are choosing to use birth control, and more of them are also delaying sexual intercourse. That’s partly because New York is one of the 21 states that allows all minors to have access to contraceptive services — and two years ago, the public school system began a pilot program to provide Plan B to public school students in districts with high rates of unintended pregnancy:

The city has worked to make it easier for kids to get birth control — giving out condoms at schools and making birth control and the morning-after pill available in some school clinics, a sometimes controversial move.

Farley said the numbers show that strategy is working.

“It shows that when you make condoms and contraception available to teens, they don’t increase their likelihood of being sexually active. But they get the message that sex is risky,” he said. [...]

Teen pregnancy in the city is still higher than it is nationwide, but it has fallen at a sharper rate, officials said.

Despite the promising trends, health officials in the city note that there are still significant racial and geographic disparities among the teens who are getting pregnant. The Bronx has the highest rate of teen pregnancy in the country, and African-American teens in New York City have a much higher pregnancy rate than their white counterparts — 110.7 births for every 1,000 back girls, compared with 16 births for every 1,000 white girls. That trend is evident on a national level, too. Black and Latina women have the highest rates of unplanned pregnancy and, subsequently, the highest rates of abortion.

But the city’s school system is on the right track, since part of addressing the connection between poverty and teen pregnancy is increasing access to affordable birth control. Removing the cost barriers to contraception encourages low-income women to choose longer-lasting, more effective forms of birth control that lower their risk for unintended pregnancy. And increasing adolescents’ access to Plan B is particularly important since the Department of Health and Human Services requires women under the age of 17 to obtain a prescription for Plan B, an unnecessary extra step that is often a barrier preventing adolescents from accessing the contraception they need in a timely manner.

Despite right-wing fervor over Plan B, it is an extremely safe medication that does not actually induce abortion. The majority of parents whose children are enrolled in New York City’s public schools support the city’s initiative to expand access to this type of contraception.

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If they enforced bank regulations like they do park rules, we wouldn't be in this mess

by on Feb. 5, 2013 at 8:46 AM
Replies (31-40):
brookiecookie87
by Platinum Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 11:47 AM



Quoting yourspecialkid:

 

Quoting brookiecookie87:



Quoting yourspecialkid:

 

Quoting brookiecookie87:


So we should let these kids get pregnant and then tell them not to have abortions? And then complain when they have kids that they cannot take care of? And then cry about it when they need government help?

Or perhaps we can give them plan B. Put them on birth control (or give them condoms) and educate them about sex, the risk, and protection. So they can grow up, graduate high school, and get a foothold in adulthood before they are having a kid?

Quoting yourspecialkid:

 They would not have needed Plan B if they had kept their pants up to begin with.  If people cannot control something as simple as a sexual impulse what else are they not going to be able to control?

 



 What part of "keep their pants up" did you not get?  Do we really want our kids thinking there is an easy way out when they are irresponsible?  Shouldn't we be teaching them the importantance of self-control and responsibility?  What is going to happen when they are grown?

 

What par t of-That doesn't work didn't you understand?

If a teenager needs planned B the, "Keep your pants up" did not work. No amount of shaming them will make them safe from being pregnant. Know what will make them safe from being pregnant? Planned B.

As as the health commissioner pointed out not only has this reduced Teen pregnancy but it also has delayed the sexual activity for more teens. That's right. They didn't as you suggest say, "Oh there are ways to avoid pregnancy and keep myself safe from STD's. I should have More sex and sooner!"

Pregnancies have gone down and the kids are waiter longer. Do you have a problem with less pregnancies and kids waiting longer to start having sex?

Or are you just upset that educating kids about sex and equipping them to protect themselves from pregnancies works?

 Gotta go....you need to read the rest of my answers.  Abstinance education does work when presented in the right way.

 

Your argument doesn't follow reality though. You implied making contraceptives available will teach them there is an easy way out. It doesn't. I don't know a single person who thinks, "I can have unprotective sex because Plan B exist".

And you are wrong in your second assertion. Teaching them about sex, protected sex, and unprotected sex, and giving them the option to get contraceptives, condoms and other tools does NOT mean they are also not taught to be responsible or self-control.

In fact it makes them more responsible. Because if they choose to make the choice to have sex they can do it more responsibly by doing it protected which cuts down on STD's and pregnancy.

Teaching abstinence doesn't teach self control and responsibility. It just removes options and knowledge from them. No one is telling these kids, "Here are condoms go have sex!" They are still be told that condoms won't protect you from all STDs and are not 100% effective. They are sitll being told they should wait to have sex. The only difference is they are given the toolset to help them incase they do make the choice to have sex.


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If they enforced bank regulations like they do park rules, we wouldn't be in this mess

AdrianneHill
by Platinum Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 11:50 AM
Lol.

You should change your name to fun police because that is really where all of your anger comes from.
Children are great punishments for sex and used as a way to instill terror of sexuality until holy matrimony comes in at about sixteen or younger. What a great way to live. It was easy to be a virgin on you're wedding night if you were married as soon as you had a period. The idea of secondary schools for teenagers have people this illusion that no one had sex until marriage and no one got married until after eighteen. You're basing human interactions on a span of less than fifty years in human history. Try to pull back the magnifying glass and take in a bigger picture


Quoting yourspecialkid:

 


Quoting brookiecookie87:


 


So we should let these kids get pregnant and then tell them not to have abortions? And then complain when they have kids that they cannot take care of? And then cry about it when they need government help?

Or perhaps we can give them plan B. Put them on birth control (or give them condoms) and educate them about sex, the risk, and protection. So they can grow up, graduate high school, and get a foothold in adulthood before they are having a kid?


Quoting yourspecialkid:


 They would not have needed Plan B if they had kept their pants up to begin with.  If people cannot control something as simple as a sexual impulse what else are they not going to be able to control?


 


 


 


 What part of "keep their pants up" did you not get?  Do we really want our kids thinking there is an easy way out when they are irresponsible?  Shouldn't we be teaching them the importantance of self-control and responsibility?  What is going to happen when they are grown?


 

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mandaday
by Silver Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 11:51 AM
Most abstinence only sex ed does not work. As a teen I moved from a big city with comprehensive sex ed to a small religious town with abstinence only education. Just as high amount of them were active. But the pure ignorance about it astounded me, even then. Between those of my friends who were education and those who weren't, the uneducated ones had way more pregnancies, way more abortions, and ended up married young and soon divorced way more often. And statistics show this is often true.
I would rather educate and prep kids for all scenarios, for those who wait and those who don't, than set one ideal that only some will live up to. Even those who choose to have sex still deserve the best chance at building good lives for themselves.


Quoting yourspecialkid:

 


Quoting mandaday:

Yeah, but like many people, they didn't choose to keep their pants up. And since abstinence only education not only doesn't inspire them to keep their pants up either but also does nothing to help them one the pants come down, this does seem to be a better route to take, doesn't it?


Quoting yourspecialkid:


 They would not have needed Plan B if they had kept their pants up to begin with.  If people cannot control something as simple as a sexual impulse what else are they not going to be able to control?



 


 Unnecessary pharmaceuticals are rarely the better choice.  Some abstinance education is working.  It depends on how it is presented.  There was a really good program...Illinois I think...it didn't focus on the not having sex part..but the responsiblity part..it was part of a greater program to keep kids in school..graduate them.


It is like many other things...it is all in the handling.  My Mom handled it in a great way..."if you come home pregnant, being pregnant is going to be the least of your worries."  I have chose a responsibility/consequences approach for my sons.  My oldest and I have had some very good conversations..he has input some things I would not have thought of...like if he got a girl pregnant..she didn't tell him and he had a child he never knew about...other stuff. 

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jessilin0113
by Platinum Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 12:10 PM
1 mom liked this
Yes. In this particular instance, I WOULD prefer kids to have "the easy way out". The consequences of making them "step up" can be extremely detrimental, if not downright catastrophic. The punishment does not equal the crime, so to speak.
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lizzielouaf
by Gold Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 12:24 PM
1 mom liked this

Maybe people just don't know what Plan B is?

Plan B One-Step® (levonorgestrel) is intended to prevent pregnancy after known or suspected contraceptive failure or unprotected intercourse.

Plan B One-Step® is not effective in terminating an existing pregnancy. Do not use Plan B One-Step® if you are already pregnant because it will not work. Plan B One-Step® does not protect against HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Side effects may include changes in your period, nausea, lower abdominal pain, fatigue, headache, and dizziness. If your period is more than a week late, you may be pregnant. You should not take Plan B One-Step® if you are already pregnant. 

chloedee
by Bronze Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 12:34 PM


Quoting yourspecialkid:

 

Quoting brookiecookie87:



Quoting yourspecialkid:

 

Quoting brookiecookie87:


So we should let these kids get pregnant and then tell them not to have abortions? And then complain when they have kids that they cannot take care of? And then cry about it when they need government help?

Or perhaps we can give them plan B. Put them on birth control (or give them condoms) and educate them about sex, the risk, and protection. So they can grow up, graduate high school, and get a foothold in adulthood before they are having a kid?

Quoting yourspecialkid:

 They would not have needed Plan B if they had kept their pants up to begin with.  If people cannot control something as simple as a sexual impulse what else are they not going to be able to control?

 



 What part of "keep their pants up" did you not get?  Do we really want our kids thinking there is an easy way out when they are irresponsible?  Shouldn't we be teaching them the importantance of self-control and responsibility?  What is going to happen when they are grown?

 

What par t of-That doesn't work didn't you understand?

If a teenager needs planned B the, "Keep your pants up" did not work. No amount of shaming them will make them safe from being pregnant. Know what will make them safe from being pregnant? Planned B.

As as the health commissioner pointed out not only has this reduced Teen pregnancy but it also has delayed the sexual activity for more teens. That's right. They didn't as you suggest say, "Oh there are ways to avoid pregnancy and keep myself safe from STD's. I should have More sex and sooner!"

Pregnancies have gone down and the kids are waiter longer. Do you have a problem with less pregnancies and kids waiting longer to start having sex?

Or are you just upset that educating kids about sex and equipping them to protect themselves from pregnancies works?

 Gotta go....you need to read the rest of my answers.  Abstinance education does work when presented in the right way.

 

Is it a coincidence, then, that states which use abstinence only education have the highest teen pregnancy rates? That absolutely no unbiased studies and public health groups have supported it being effective?

The study you're referring to in Philadelphia was aimed at 6th and 7th graders, and measured their sexual activity in the period 2 years later. 1/3 still had sex, and those who did wait were still only about 14. The study's authors said that abstinence only was not an effective long term solution. (http://articles.cnn.com/2010-02-02/health/abstinence.study_1_abstinence-education-abstinence-program-abstinence-only-education/2?_s=PM:HEALTH)

As well, the study's abstinence only lessons did not tell them to wait until they were married, it told them to wait until they were ready. For some, feeling ready may be 16, 17 or 18, in which case they may have delayed sexual activity but still haven't kept their pants on, as you so charmingly put it, and may still need Plan B.


gcecelie
by Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 12:44 PM

I've met MORE than my fair share of women who think Plan B is an abortion pill. I have seen a pharmacy tech throw a fit and refused to help someone, another worker came up instead (Yeah, I filed a complaint. What if they are taking it because of rape? It's none of her business.)

A lot of people do not understand that it is more of a concentrated amount of regular old boring BC pills. If you don't like Plan B, then what reason do you have to be accepting BC? If you already have BC then in many cases, you can take enough to work like Plan B.

Also, for all those young ladies who do not have or do not know how to get access to BC without involving their parents (funds, transportation, lack of facilities, etc), I think this is way better than getting pregnant.

Quoting lizzielouaf:

 

Maybe people just don't know what Plan B is?

Plan B One-Step® (levonorgestrel) is intended to prevent pregnancy after known or suspected contraceptive failure or unprotected intercourse.

Plan B One-Step® is not effective in terminating an existing pregnancy. Do not use Plan B One-Step® if you are already pregnant because it will not work. Plan B One-Step® does not protect against HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Side effects may include changes in your period, nausea, lower abdominal pain, fatigue, headache, and dizziness. If your period is more than a week late, you may be pregnant. You should not take Plan B One-Step® if you are already pregnant. 

 

Lilypie Pregnancy tickers
Mystres
by Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 12:48 PM

Some one said it, and I will agree with it.  It will encourage them to have sex.  And Unprotected sex, chancing getting STDs.  I mean really the Boy Says "Oh Girl, we dont need a condom, you can just take the Pill and not worry about it, I'm Clean, I promise"


lizzielouaf
by Gold Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 12:49 PM

Ya I'm not sure if people are aware Plan B will not END a pregnancy and it's completely independent of RU-486.

Quoting gcecelie:

I've met MORE than my fair share of women who think Plan B is an abortion pill. I have seen a pharmacy tech throw a fit and refused to help someone, another worker came up instead (Yeah, I filed a complaint. What if they are taking it because of rape? It's none of her business.)

A lot of people do not understand that it is more of a concentrated amount of regular old boring BC pills. If you don't like Plan B, then what reason do you have to be accepting BC? If you already have BC then in many cases, you can take enough to work like Plan B.

Also, for all those young ladies who do not have or do not know how to get access to BC without involving their parents (funds, transportation, lack of facilities, etc), I think this is way better than getting pregnant.

Quoting lizzielouaf:


Maybe people just don't know what Plan B is?

Plan B One-Step® (levonorgestrel) is intended to prevent pregnancy after known or suspected contraceptive failure or unprotected intercourse.

Plan B One-Step® is not effective in terminating an existing pregnancy. Do not use Plan B One-Step® if you are already pregnant because it will not work. Plan B One-Step® does not protect against HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Side effects may include changes in your period, nausea, lower abdominal pain, fatigue, headache, and dizziness. If your period is more than a week late, you may be pregnant. You should not take Plan B One-Step® if you are already pregnant. 

 



Traci_Momof2
by Silver Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 12:50 PM
1 mom liked this

 


Quoting yourspecialkid:

 

Quoting mandaday:

Yeah, but like many people, they didn't choose to keep their pants up. And since abstinence only education not only doesn't inspire them to keep their pants up either but also does nothing to help them one the pants come down, this does seem to be a better route to take, doesn't it?

Quoting yourspecialkid:

 They would not have needed Plan B if they had kept their pants up to begin with.  If people cannot control something as simple as a sexual impulse what else are they not going to be able to control?


 

 Unnecessary pharmaceuticals are rarely the better choice.  Some abstinance education is working.  It depends on how it is presented.  There was a really good program...Illinois I think...it didn't focus on the not having sex part..but the responsiblity part..it was part of a greater program to keep kids in school..graduate them.

It is like many other things...it is all in the handling.  My Mom handled it in a great way..."if you come home pregnant, being pregnant is going to be the least of your worries."  I have chose a responsibility/consequences approach for my sons.  My oldest and I have had some very good conversations..he has input some things I would not have thought of...like if he got a girl pregnant..she didn't tell him and he had a child he never knew about...other stuff. 

And how does fear teach responsibility?  How does fear teach consequences?

Teaching through fear, or teaching "keep your pants up" isn't going to solve anything.  Teens are always going to have sex no matter what.  Just like teens are always going to steal their parents car no matter what.  The thing is, if a teen steals their parents car and gets in a wreck, the consequences will follow them for about 7 years (or how long it stays on their record).  If a teen has sex and gets pregnant, or gets their partner pregnant, it will follow them for life.  There is no way to completely escape that mistake.  So why not arm them with knowledge to protect themselves from the greatest consequence that they could possibly encounter?  Why not give them the tools to make sure they are full-fledged adults before having children, even if they are sexually active teens?  Because having a child should never be viewed as a punishment.

 

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